Shocker: Millennials Want To Switch Jobs and Work From Home

Tempura/iStock

Tempura/iStock

Deloitte recently published its 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey, in which it interviewed almost 8,000 millennials from 29 countries to find out how they feel about their employers, the workforce and the economy. The results read like a laundry list of millennial critiques: They want to job hop. They care more about employee relations than profits. They want to work from home. Hardly shocking.

Let’s take a look at some of the notable findings. Read more »

Millennials Won — Mark Squilla’s “Promoters Bill” Is Dead

Mark Squilla

Councilman Mark Squilla | Photo courtesy of City Council’s Flickr

City Councilman Mark Squilla has decided to scrap his virally unpopular “Promoters Bill,” which came under fire last week from musicians, millennials and First Amendment advocates. The proposal would have required music venues to collect the names, addresses and phone numbers of performers for city police.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reported Tuesday that Squilla “had planned to amend the legislation, but decided it was too tainted by controversy” to carry on. “There’s been so much confusion and misinformation about the bill,” he told the newspaper, “that even if we struck that out, some people would show up to oppose it not understanding what they were opposing.”

Squilla says he’ll start from scratch on a new bill, this time while consulting the music industry. He insists that his goal all along was to ensure that every venue in the city paid an annual $100 licensing fee, including those that stream music from iPhones. Read more »

No, Millennials Aren’t Ruining the Workforce

First, a disclaimer.

Even though I technically fall in the “millennial” camp — a generation that Pew defines as adults age 18-34 — I’m on the upper end of the spectrum, and it’s starting to show. I don’t know how to use Snapchat, I get anxious every time someone talks about Peach, and I just recently upgraded to an iPhone 4. A little over a year ago I invested in a sectional sofa and premium cable, so my days of being even the least bit relevant are numbered.

But, yes, still a millennial. And as such, according to a recent piece in Philadelphia magazine, part of a generation that is responsible for “ruining the workforce.”

Did I raise an eyebrow at that headline? Yes. Did I raise it as high as some of my fellow millennials? Judging by the hundreds and hundreds of heated comments the article inspired, absolutely not. (I mean, Jesus Christ, guys — calm down already. I’ve gotten divorced with less drama.)

As deliciously millennial as it would be to write an opinion piece critiquing an opinion piece, I’m going to pass. (Or, am I going to tip-toe around it for another 400 words in a millennial tightrope-walking act, reluctant to commit and afraid to offend in the absence of a trigger warning?) Instead, in the interest of restoring the peace, I’m here to dispel some common misconceptions about my people. Read more »

How Millennials Are Ruining the Workforce

Illustration by Jason Raish

Illustration by Jason Raish

As a boomer, I have a special interest in millennials. It’s the same sort of interest I have in car wrecks: I don’t want to see what’s going on, but I can’t look away. Take, for instance, the cover story that Time magazine had a few months back about how millennials are raising their children. I didn’t read the article. I couldn’t, because the very first paragraph stopped me cold. Here it is, reproduced in full:

On a playground in San Francisco, 4-year-old Astral Defiance Hayes takes a stick and writes his name in the sand. His twin brother Defy Aster Hayes whizzes around their father.

The fact is, I don’t need to know anything more about how millennials are parenting than that two of them thought it was a great idea to name their twin boys Astral Defiance and Defy Aster.

I mean: Who does that? Read more »

Millennials: They’re Doing Thanksgiving Better Than You

The first "Friendsgiving?"

The first “Friendsgiving?”

“There are lies, damn lies and statistics,” Mark Twain famously said, and it was the last of these that struck me in an article published the other day on Philly.com. Headlined “Millennials Are Celebrating Thanksgiving in Their Own Way—Culturally and Commercially,” the piece detailed the many ways in which the boomers’ children are improving on the holiday. The data analytics company Dunnhumby, based in Cinncinnati and, it would seem, a real entity and not a product of Lewis Carroll’s fevered imagination, performed a new survey showing that millennials are “straying away from tradition while using emerging technologies to shop and plan for the holiday.” This, Dunnhumby says, is “a stark contrast from older Americans.”

What exactly are these profound differences? Twenty percent of millennials, according to Dunnhumby, are planning to purchase their turkey and trimmings via a food delivery app; in the survey, nobody my age (i.e., 55 or older) intended to do so. Who the hell would? Are you going to trust the young idiots who keep bagging your groceries with the canned goods atop the bread and lettuce to choose your Thanksgiving turkey? The apples for your pie? Your green beans? You have to know how to cook to care about how to buy food, and millennials can’t cook their way out of a paper bag. They only know how to eat out and then talk about it all the time. Read more »

7 Ways Millennials Can Network Without Feeling Like Pests

(StockLite/Shutterstock

(StockLite/Shutterstock)

Networking is all about building relationships and adding value. So as a millennial, what can you offer a more experienced “connector” so that you don’t feel that you have nothing to contribute? (Or you don’t feel like you’re just angling for a better job?)

I recommend you do as much networking as possible so that having conversations, looking for ways to help and connecting people becomes second nature. And here are seven tips for bridging the gap: Read more »

Philly’s Political Elders Lament the Lack of Millennials Running for Office

Photo by Bradley Maule

Photo by Bradley Maule

Mayor Michael Nutter is in that glorious final phase of his tenure where he’s calling things exactly as he sees them. With seven weeks left in office and very little to lose, he’s taking on everyone from mega-restaurateur Stephen Starr to elections chief Anthony Clark to the School Reform Commission.

One of his most intriguing targets has been millennials. Over the last few months, he’s been shouting from the rooftops that too few young people are running for elected office in Philadelphia. “Where are younger people?” he asked at Philly Mag’s ThinkFest last week. “Are they even thinking about running for office?”

He’s even gotten mean about it: “I’m increasingly concerned that many young people are just finding other avenues. And, you know, having 9 million followers on Twitter is not your level of political engagement.” Read more »

Philly’s Millennial Population Growing Fastest Among 10 Largest U.S. Cities

Source: JLL Research, U.S. Census Bureau.

Source: JLL Research, U.S. Census Bureau.

Philadelphia’s millennial population is increasing fastest among the 10 largest U.S. cities, according financial and professional services firm JLL and data from the U.S. Census.

Between 2006 and 2014, Philly added 120,600 millennials, a surge of 41.2 percent. Today, millennials (ages 20-34 years old), make up 26.5 percent of the citywide population. Read more »

How to Retain Talented Young Employees in the Era of Job Hopping

The younger they are, the more likely they're looking for new jobs.

The younger they are, the more likely they’re looking for new jobs. (Anchiy/Shutterstock)

There’s a new generation of workers who recognize that working at one company for the duration of their careers is a thing of the past. We’re also seeing the millennial generation enter the workforce in increasing numbers. Many of these up-and-comers have a staunch “give it to me now or I’ll go get it somewhere else” mindset.

So for business owners and managers, how can we slow down the revolving door? I’ve learned that it’s unrealistic to think we can stop it, but we can do our best to keep team members engaged. Here are some tips that I’ve found helpful over the past 17 years. Read more »

« Older Posts