Penn Is the Nation’s Sixth Best School for Tech Transfer, Report Finds

The Pennovation Center. | Photo: © Michael Moran via HWKN

The Pennovation Center. | Photo: © Michael Moran via HWKN

Last week, the Milken Institute, a California think tank, released a new report that ranks more than 200 universities across the country according to “technology transfer,” a school’s ability to turn its research into actual products or research-driven startups.

The report “Concept to Commercialization: The Best Universities for Technology Transfer” ranked the University of Pennsylvania as the sixth best university in the nation for technology transfer, up from 12th in 2006. In other words, Penn does a great job of turning its research into revenue, tangible products and actual jobs.

The research institutions were evaluated through an index of four key indicators: patents issued, licenses issued, licensing income, and startups formed. The report also looked at each institution’s total research funding.

Penn’s indexed score in the study was 95.39, and the school’s consistent performance across all indicators is what contributed to its high placement, the authors wrote. And a recent reorganization at the school streamlined its tech transfer efforts. In 2014, the Penn Center for Innovation consolidated Penn’s technology transfer office and other programs relating to commercialization and startups.  Read more »

Penn Condemns Neo-Nazi Flyers Posted on Campus

Penn campus

Officials at the University of Pennsylvania have denounced the messages of several neo-Nazi flyers seen littering the school’s campus.

Images of the posters, which read “How is a diploma going to help you in the race war?” and “Join your local Nazis,” spread on social media.

In an email sent to the Penn community yesterday, school officials said the flyers “appear to have been circulated by off-campus groups known to be bent on sowing fear and discord, and targeting campuses within our region and nationwide.”

According to the student-run Daily Pennsylvanian, a Twitter user who regularly posts alt-right and racist propaganda has claimed responsibility for the flyers.

Here’s the full statement from Penn officials:

“This past weekend, some neo-Nazi flyers were found posted at several locations in the vicinity of campus. These appear to have been circulated by off-campus groups known to be bent on sowing fear and discord, and targeting campuses within our region and nationwide.

Although the flyers in question are no longer posted, we think it important to take this opportunity to remind the community of our shared conviction that hatred and fear-mongering have no place at Penn.

Our University strives to be a place that is safe and welcoming for all students, faculty and staff. Expressing hate or animus for any group of individuals is vile and reprehensible. We underscore our commitment to a supportive, respectful, diverse and open campus, and we encourage the exercise of free expression rights to counter misguided hate with stronger words of truth and mutual respect. We also encourage anyone who is troubled or in need of support to reach out for help. Please know that Penn stands with you, and any of the offices below can provide you with assistance and guidance.”

In November, Penn officials responded similarly when, shortly after the election, three students at the University of Oklahoma sent disturbing online messages to black freshman at the university.

Follow @ClaireSasko on Twitter.

John Legend Teams With Penn on Criminal Justice Reform

Photo courtesy of JohnLegend.com.

Photo: JohnLegend.com.

Ten-time Grammy award-winning artist and University of Pennsylvania alum John Legend is joining the advisory board of the Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice at Penn Law.

“I am thrilled to be working with my alma mater on critical issues facing our criminal justice system,” Legend said in a release. “The Quattrone Center brings together insights from different disciplines and focuses on the tangible results of reform. I look forward to joining them in these significant efforts.” Read more »

Food Fight at 40th and Walnut

Penn has announced that Acme Markets will open a new store at the 40th and Walnut birthplace of the Fresh Grocer chain. But first, the Fresh Grocer has to move out. No word yet on when that will happen. | Photo: Gabriel Gottlieb, Philadelphia Heights blog

Penn has announced that Acme Markets will open a new store at the 40th and Walnut birthplace of the Fresh Grocer chain. But first, the Fresh Grocer has to move out. No word yet on when that will happen. | Photo: Gabriel Gottlieb, Philadelphia Heights blog

The University of Pennsylvania and Acme Markets announced yesterday (April 10) that Acme has signed a lease to open a new store in University City at the northwest corner of 40th and Walnut streets in a parking garage with ground-floor retail owned by the university.

According to the announcement, Acme plans to invest millions in upgrading the 34,500-square-foot supermarket in order to provide “a first-class urban grocery experience.”

No date for the store’s opening was included in the announcement, and there’s a reason for that: The current operator of the supermarket hasn’t vacated the premises yet. Read more »

Yes, Virginia, There Really WAS a Philadelphia School

John Rauch residence, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, 1984-85. | Images: Architectural Archives, University of Pennsylvania, unless otherwise noted

John Rauch residence, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, 1984-85. | Images: Architectural Archives, University of Pennsylvania, unless otherwise noted

You may have heard the term “Philadelphia School” used to refer to a group of architects who dominated, and some say transformed, the city’s built environment in the 1960s and 1970s: Louis Kahn. Robert Venturi. Robert Geddes. John Bower. Ehrman Mitchell and Romaldo Giurgola.

Yet when most of us use the term, we don’t use it in the way one uses “Chicago School” to refer to the architects that ushered in the modern era in that city: Daniel Burnham, Henry Hobson Richardson, Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan, John Root and their contemporaries.

An exhibit at the Philomathean Society at the University of Pennsylvania through April 17 argues that we should. Read more »

Wharton Wants Penn English Majors to Apply for an MBA

Penn campus

Huntsman Hall.

Penn liberal arts majors looking to switch gears after graduation have a new enticing option. On Wednesday, the Wharton School announced the Moelis Advance Access Program, a new initiative that gives Penn seniors the chance to gain admission to the prestigious business schools, well before the average MBA applicant gets in.

And there’s a financial aid twist to the initiative, which exists because of a $10 million gift from Wharton alumni Ken Moelis and Julie Taffet Moelis. Students accepted into the new program will be considered for a $10,000 fellowship each year during the two-year full-time MBA program. Read more »

Penn Study: Arts Improve Well-Being in Poorer Neighborhoods

A new study from Penn’s Social Impact of the Arts project found that cultural resources in lower-income neighborhoods are “significantly” linked to better schooling, health, and security.

“Going to a museum won’t cause you to lose weight or reduce your chances of being mugged, but communities with cultural resources do better,” Mark Stern, lead researcher of the project and professor of social welfare and history, said in a statement. “Our research clearly demonstrated that sections of the City are doing well on a number of dimensions of well-being, in spite of significant economic challenges.” Read more »

Penn Prof’s Study: Sleepy Teens More Likely to Become Criminals

Teenagers who are drowsy during the day are more likely to have a criminal record later in life, according to a new study from a Penn professor.

Adrian Raine, a professor of criminology, psychiatry, and psychology, writes in a new paper that teens who were frequently drowsy were 4.5 times as likely to have a criminal record by age 29.

“The simple finding is that kids who are drowsy during the day are more anti-social,” he tells Penn’s website. “What’s more interesting, however, is if we follow these kids for nine years, we find that sleepy teenagers are more likely to have a criminal record.”

The study began with a question Raine asked while doing his dissertation work under Peter Venables, a co-author on the paper. Back then, Raine studied the sleep habits of 101 15-year-old boys in England. Nine years later, he searched a criminal records database for the names of those 101 boys. Read more »

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