City’s Snow Tab: $18 Million

It was such a snowy winter in Philadelphia…

How … Snowy … Was it?

It was such a snowy winter in Philadelphia that plowing the streets this winter cost taxpayers $18 million dollars — three times the normal amount. Streets Commissioner David Perri announced the number Tuesday at a City Council committee hearing.  (Inquirer)

City Council Has an Ethics Committee! (But It Never, Ever Meets)

city-council

Philadelphia is one of the most corrupt major cities this side of Lagos. From the ABSCAM convictions in 1981 to Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown’s 2013 admission that she broke campaign finance law, we’ve had nine lawbreakers on City Council over a 32-year period. If you’re not particularly good at math, know that this averages out to more than one lawbreaker for every four-year Council term. Read more »

Thanks to New Funding, City Hall Station Renovation Is Back on Track [UPDATED]

Photo: Liz Spikol

Photo: Liz Spikol

All SEPTA riders know that City Hall/15th Street Station is, at best, unappetizing. According to Sandy Smith, it is the only station on the Market-Frankford and Broad Street lines that has gone untouched for at least 30 years. Some SEPTA riders may also know that for a while now, the agency has been promising to redo the whole thing.

Well, according to SEPTA, that’ll actually start to happen in the coming years thanks to the November passage of Act 89, the state’s transportation funding bill. Last week SEPTA quietly released its proposed capital budget and program for the coming years, and it includes $146 million between 2015 and 2026 for the project, which had previously been deferred due to lack of funding. The promised improvements: elevators throughout, more open space on the Broad Street Line platforms, new ventilation in re-opened air shafts, new architectural finishes and signage, new fare lines, platforms raised to car door height, redone inter-station corridors, and public art.

Read more »

10 Burning Questions About Kathleen Kane’s Abandoned Sting

We’re not sure we’ve often seen a story reported in such close detail as the Inquirer’s series of stories about the sting operation that targeted Philly Democrats with under-the-table cash payments, along with Attorney General Kathleen Kane’s decision not to prosecute any cases resulting from that operation. While the framework has stayed the same, each story — drawn from case summaries and interviews — has added a new layer of detail.

Still, we have questions, some of them prompted by the political aftermath, some by the reporting itself.



 

« Older Posts