Chris May, Kathy Orr, Beasley Reece Out at CBS3

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Chris May, Kathy Orr, and Beasley Reece are all out at CBS3, a spokeswoman confirmed to Philly Mag Tuesday evening, apparently part of a broader shakeup in the station’s news ranks.

May co-anchored the station’s 5, 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts, as well as a 10 p.m. broadcast. Orr provided forecasts on weeknights at both stations, and Reece had been sports director at the station.

May acknowledged his departure in a Tweet Tuesday afternoon:

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Newspaper Strike Countdown: Scenes From Today’s Rally

Photos by Joel Mathis

Photos by Joel Mathis

Tick, tock.

Hundreds of Newspaper Guild members marched during a noontime rally Thursday at the Market Street office of Philadelphia Media Network, chanting demands for a fair contract as the clock ticked down on just more than two days left before the current work agreement expires. Read more »

PMN to Journalists: Here’s How You Can Cross Picket Lines

The Newspaper Guild has already printed picket signs in case of a possible strike.

The Newspaper Guild has already printed picket signs in case of a possible strike.

With a possible strike by the Newspaper Guild looming, Philadelphia Media Network today sent employees a memo apparently aimed at getting them — or at least a few of them — to stay on the job during a walkout.

Yes, you can keep working if a strike is called, said the memo from the company that owns the Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com. We’ll provide security and a safe way to report in to your managers. And if you’re worried about being fined by the Newspaper Guild for crossing the picket line — well, here’s a template for a letter you can send that exempts you from most responsibilities that come with union membership.

And, oh yeah, if you do walk out? Don’t necessarily expect to come back, ever. Read more »

Clock Ticking on Newspaper Deal

The Newspaper Guild has already printed picket signs in case of a possible strike.

The Newspaper Guild has already printed picket signs in case of a possible strike.

Monday could be a make-or-break day in negotiations between Philadelphia Media Network — which owns the Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com — and the Newspaper Guild.

The guild’s leaders said in a Thursday night memo to members, that the two sides will meet that day with a federal mediator — and that the mediator “has asked the Company to be prepared to stay as long as necessary on Monday to reach a deal.”

The current contract between the two sides expires the following Saturday. Guild members have already approved strike preparations. Read more »

Here’s What’s at Stake in Newspaper-Union Battle Over Seniority

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The Newspaper Guild’s stance on the seniority question can be found on sarcastic stickers in PMN’s Market Street newsrooms — and on the web.

Who gets to be part of the future of Philadelphia’s biggest, most venerable journalistic enterprise? Young, eager newbies ready to stake their claim to the city? Or older workers who’ve already spent 20, 30 years or more adapting to sweeping changes they never could’ve anticipated at the beginning of their career?

That’s one of the big questions at the heart of the dispute between Philadelphia Media Network — owner of the Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com — and the Newspaper Guild that represents the company’s journalists, ad sales staff and other support staffers. Most of the focus on the jammed-up negotiations between the two sides has been about the medical benefits those staffers will receive, but another question — seniority — looms just as large.

The essential conflict is this: The union wants to keep long-held “last-hired first-fired” seniority rules in place, so that long-tenured (read: older, more expensive) journalists aren’t tossed overboard in favor of cheaper, younger labor should the company do layoffs again in the near future. The company, though, says it needs flexibility to keep the workers who contribute best to its vision of 21st century journalism (read: younger, more tech-savvy) — and to more easily shed workers who don’t.

Thus, the impasse. Read more »

Laying Off Jewish Exponent Staff a Necessary Evil

No, the Jewish Exponent is not dead.

No, the Jewish Exponent is not dead.

Sometimes, tough business decisions need to be made.

There’s no denying that the Jewish Exponent was in serious financial trouble over the past 10 years — so when the paper laid off its entire editorial staff last week, I was not surprised. And I think the paper’s editorial takeover by Mid-Atlantic Media is a step in the right direction.

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Newspaper Guild Votes to Begin Strike Preparations

Newspaper Guild leaders Regina Medina and Diane Mastrull, left, count paper ballots for strike authorization, while Bill Ross and Howard Gensler, right, tally up e-mailed votes. The action took place  Wednesday night on the 33rd floor of the Loews Hotel. (Picture: Joel Mathis)

Newspaper Guild leaders Regina Medina and Diane Mastrull, left, count paper ballots for strike authorization, while Bill Ross and Howard Gensler, right, tally up e-mailed votes. The action took place Wednesday night on the 33rd floor of the Loews Hotel. (Pictures: Joel Mathis)

The Newspaper Guild on Wednesday overwhelmingly voted to begin preparations for a strike against Philadelphia Media Network, the parent company of the Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com.

There were two votes — one by employees of the newspapers, and one by workers for Philly.com, who have a separate but similar contract with PMN. Neither vote was particularly close: 263-19 in favor of strike preparations by so-called “main unit” employees; 24-7 in favor by Philly.com workers. Sixty-nine percent of guild membership voted.

“It wasn’t unanimous,” said Howard Gensler, the guild’s president and a gossip columnist for the Daily News, “but it was a very strong, supportive vote we hope sends a message to the company we’re not fooling around.” Read more »

Jewish Exponent Lays Off Editorial Staff

The Jewish Exponent is moving in a new editorial direction.

The Jewish Exponent is moving in a new editorial direction.

The Jewish Exponent laid off its editorial and production staff on Wednesday — a total of 15 people. The paper had been in serious financial trouble, losing $300,000 per year, said Steve Rosenberg, publisher for the Jewish Exponent and chief marketing officer for its owner, the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia.

Jewish Exponent editorial content will now be driven by Mid-Atlantic Media, which publishes the Baltimore Jewish Times, Washington Jewish Week and other titles. Mid-Atlantic will hire a managing editor and four writers — all based in Philadelphia — and continue to publish the weekly print edition and its online content at jewishexponent.com. Read more »

Internet Meets Caitlyn Jenner, Immediately Sexualizes Her

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I was getting coffee when Caitlyn Jenner met the Internet. Not fancy coffee — regular drip, black, get that cinnamon-sugar shaker away from me — so we’re talking maybe 15 minutes away from my desk. And yet that was enough time for seemingly the entire world to chime in on the Vanity Fair cover story documenting her transition.

Many were supportive and respectful, from Lady Gaga to Rick Santorum. Others, of course, were decidedly less so. (Tell me, how does it feel to be behind Rick Santorum in the Evolution line? Or don’t you guys believe in that yet? As you were.) But lurking through it all — the Facebook comments, the coverage from major outlets, even Vanity Fair’s presentation and promotion of the story — was an ugly subtext: After less than a day of revealing her new identity, Caitlyn Jenner had already been objectified and sexualized for our entertainment.

Which makes sense. She is, after all, a woman. Read more »

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