Ranking Philly’s 5 Mortal Parking Sins

 

Even with the strange new lens through which Philadelphians now view City Hall and parking, what happened over at the intersection of Broad and Market earlier this month was truly strange. After unified public outcry over apps that allow users to auction off their public parking spots, City Council responded, advancing a bill that would make it illegal to sell or reserve these spots.

In any other city, I assume that this is how things are supposed to go: Citizens see a problem, the government responds, changes are made.

But this is Philly, where pay-to-play is a time-honored tradition, and where our unique brand of parking rage and bureaucracy has earned us a reality TV show.

How did we come together over, of all things, parking? It seems that Monkey Parking and Haystack — two of the apps in question — are at the pinnacle of injustice, so clearly corrupt and backwards that even Philadelphia can’t embrace them.

With snow on the horizon and holiday shopping season in full, frenzied swing, here’s a reminder of Philly’s parking faux pas, from minor infractions to unforgivable transgressions (all of which are risky maneuvers in a city that routinely lands on Santa’s shit-list).

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It’s Started Snowing — Thundersnowing — in Philadelphia

Try to stay calm people, but it’s snowing.

Yes, the Great Snow of Thanksgiving Eve 2014 is here. Though we’re only expecting around two inches of snow in the city, this is already an exciting snowstorm, because we’ve had some thundersnow.

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Could Caucus of Working Educators Oust PFT Leadership?

City Paper’s Daniel Denvir has a lengthy article today about the Caucus of Working Educators, a 141-member group founded in March that just held its first convention. Denvir compares it to Chicago’s Caucus of Rank and File Educators, which took over the Chicago Teachers Union in 2010 and held a successful, well-supported strike in 2012.

Of course, Philadelphia teachers are banned from striking by state law. But the article paints a picture of a group of teachers upset (or at least disappointed) with PFT leadership. The state takeover of schools in 2001, changing attitudes about unions, and the pro-charter school movement have stripped PFT of a lot of its power.

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This Thanksgiving, Ferguson Makes Football Seem Small

National Guard stand in front of the Ferguson Police Department Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. Missouri's governor ordered hundreds more state militia into Ferguson on Tuesday, after a night of protests and rioting over a grand jury's decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, a case that has inflamed racial tensions in the U.S.

National Guard stand in front of the Ferguson Police Department Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. Missouri’s governor ordered hundreds more state militia into Ferguson on Tuesday, after a night of protests and rioting over a grand jury’s decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, a case that has inflamed racial tensions in the U.S.

On Monday night, three days before a colossal NFL game between the Eagles and Dallas Cowboys on Thanksgiving, a major news story began playing out making the game seem pretty small.

The situation in Ferguson involves all of us. We can’t hide from it and it can’t be swept behind a wall of conversation about a football game.

What I do on 97.5 FM The Fanatic is sports talk, but it’s really life talk — conversation among people of different races, creed and colors. And when an issue like this explodes in front of us, it is our duty to talk on it. Conversation fosters understanding; it’s the only thing that can foster understanding because it’s the only way we can hear and attempt to understand another’s viewpoint. So to the people who tweet me with nonsense like “I thought this was a sports station; let’s talk sports,” I have the following message: Open your mind, grow and progress, if just for the sake of your children and future generations who should live in a society that’s not always at odds.

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