Is a 20-Story Condo High-Rise Back in Play at Broad and Fitzwater?

Rendering of what the 20-story condo high rise | Provided by Anthony Beverley

Rendering of what the 20-story condo high rise | Provided by Anthony Beverley

There’s been an interesting change of plans for the long-vacant lot at 740-48 South Broad Street. Conceptual designs for a tall-ish condo building were posted on the site at Broad and Fitzwater a while back. Then, it morphed into a few projects consisting of 8 single-family homes listed at $1 million (plus) a piece. One such development was dubbed Mona Lisa’s on the Avenue of the Arts.

We had heard that the land was quietly being marketed as a condo high-rise yet again and, earlier this week, Zillow had it listed as “for sale by owner” for $15 million–a price that includes the land, plans for the high rise and its zoning approvals. Lo and behold, we’ve learned that even this information isn’t quite accurate.

Zillow lists Anthony Beverley as the owner of the property. Beverley, who is president of Beverley Strategic Development Group LLC and part of 720 S Broad Street LP (the listed owner of the lot) told Property that the land is actually for sale for $20 million, with all the bells and whistles of before.  The listing on Zillow was updated this morning.

So, what’s now in store for the vacant lot on a prime spit of land on South Broad Street?

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Trinity Tuesday: “Fantasy Landscape” Pied-à-Terre in Rittenhouse

TREND images via Zillow.com

TREND images via Zillow.com

Trinities, by their nature, make excellent second homes in the city for those with primary residences elsewhere. But as you can see by the responses we’ve gotten to our query about what it’s like to live in one, whole families have managed to make it work with a Father, Son & Holy Ghost as their home. Here’s a historically-registered one on the corner of 17th and Pine and it comes with a mural on its side façade to boot!

Commissioned by the city’s Mural Arts Program, Brian Senft’s “Fantasy Landscape” scene takes up the the entire left side of the home and stretches to an adjacent building. Inside, the move-in ready trinity offers newer HVAC, updated Donatucci kitchen with custom cherry wood, and a second-level room with built-in bookcases and recently renovated bathroom with skylight. Upstairs, the third floor master bedroom comes with a built-in double bed with custom storage, plus an attic/storage area. The home can be sold turn-key. Photos and specs below.

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William Penn Inn to be Restored as Three-Unit Luxury Condo Building

Rendering of the Residences at the William Penn Inn | via Main Line Adapt

Rendering of the Residences at the William Penn Inn | via Main Line Adapt

The new lease on life for the historic William Penn Inn in Wynnewood officially begins today, assuming the weather holds out, of course. A ribbon cutting is planned for the commencement of a new project that looks to transform what had been a six-unit apartment building into three luxury condos, each with their own two-car garages.

Main Line Adapt, an offshoot of Main Line ReBUILD, a development company that specializes in restoring and converting churches into luxury residences, is heading up the condo project at the inn. The scope of Main Line Adapt will move beyond the realm of churches and into a wider range of historic adaptive reuse projects.

A rep from Main Line Adapt said that the three condo units are expected to be delivered in early 2016 and will be priced $695,000, $795,000 and $895,000, respectively. Much like Main Line ReBUILD’s church conversions, the Residences at the William Penn Inn will combine modern design and carefully restored architectural features, such as the flooring, trims and moldings. They will also be within walking distance to all of the neighborhood amenities including Whole Foods, the Wynnewood Shopping Center and the Wynnewood regional rail station.

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So Tell Us, Philadelphia: What’s It Like to Live in a Trinity House?

A trinity home at 1635 Rodman Street in Philadelphia | Zillow.com

A trinity home at 1635 Rodman Street in Philadelphia | Zillow.com

“What’s it like to live in a trinity house? Looking at a trinity, but it seems a little weird to me. Is it something you just get used to?”

– Redditor garlicaioli.

Garlic, we saw that you’ve received some responses on your Reddit trinity thread already, but we thought we might help you reach a larger crowd of trinity denizens, both current and former, who could give you some insight into the experience of living in a trinity home.

So – any Philly Mag readers care to elaborate? Is living in a quirky rowhome with deep roots in Philadelphia as cool as it soundsOr is it a short-lived novelty we should just get over?

The thing is, we here at Property are in love with the idea of a trinity.  I for one would love to live in one, as mentioned last December in a round-up post of our favorite Philly trinities of 2014. Now, for those of you passively nodding your head in the hopes of not getting called on to define what a trinity is, no need to worry, we’ve got you covered.

Here’s the low-down:

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Bi-Level Loft in Old City Boasts Bricks, Beams and Beautiful Windows

All TREND images by Matt Robnett, Plush Images

All TREND images by Matt Robnett, Plush Images

With housing and rental numbers steadily trending upwards, you may think you’re priced out of the best ‘hoods in the city. At the very least, you might feel that you’re forced to compromise on something with a little less cool and in need of some real elbow grease to make it shine. Well, we’re here to say, not so, friend–not so.

Take, for example, this lovely condo near Front and Arch in Old City. Read more »

Main Line Monday: Prize Tudor Estate Near Suburban Square

TREND images via Zillow.com

TREND images via Zillow.com

That’s the beauty of (most) Main Line homes isn’t it? If properly situated, they can seem worlds away from the hum of civilization on quiet afternoons, all the while being minutes from a main street or train station by car. This two-plus acre estate in Ardmore is one such home, although it does one better: it’s within walking distance to SEPTA regional rail and Suburban Square, the boutique shopping center with expansion plans in the works.

As we said though, you wouldn’t know it on lazy days what with the tree-surrounded property encompassing a “larger than a tennis court” yard and lower garden with a brook and fountain. The pool is hidden too, notes the listing, by greenery that’s part of the circular driveway. Other of its outdoor features we think you might like: wrap-around screened porch, pea stone courtyard, pool house, and three-car garage currently used as an office with three-bedroom apartment above.

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Penn Set to Open Six New University Buildings in 2016/2017

Rendering via Penn/HWKN

Part of the Pennovation Center is expected to open in 2016. Rendering via Penn/HWKN

These days, it can’t be said that the University of Pennsylvania rests on its collective laurels when it comes to real estate development. The market is too hot, competition is too fierce and there are just too many new frontiers to explore. The Daily Pennsylvanian reminds us that there are plenty of new construction projects scheduled to wrap up by the time the 2016-2017 school year comes to a close.

In fact, as the DP‘s Luis Ferre Sadurni reports, there are at least six university-related developments in the pipeline for that time period, as part of the university’s larger 35-year plan called Penn Connects:

The centerpiece of the University’s ongoing construction is the New College House — located on Chestnut Street between 33rd and 34th streets — which is expected to be completed by August 2016. The $127 million project will house 350 students and include a dining facility, common spaces and a courtyard, according to Penn’s Facilities and Real Estate Services.

We imagine the overall experience will be decidedly different than at Penn’s Hill College House. Anyway, other projects include:

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City House of the Week: Arts & Crafts Stunner in East Mount Airy

TREND images via Redfin.com

TREND images via Redfin.com

Prior to stopping its presses in the mid-1950s, The American Magazine published a piece by builder Ashton S. Tourison in its May 1920 issue. His essay? “What People Want When They Come to Buy a Home.” The deck reads: “Some points about human nature picked up by a builder with fifty years’ experience.” You can read the first section of the article here, but we can tell you now, Tourison was perfectly confident when it came to knowing what people, especially “Philadelphia people,” wanted out of their homes.

So, what does a residence by such an authoritative figure look like? Surprise, surprise, Northwest Philadelphia – his birthplace and early building grounds– claims some of his works still around. This one, an East Mt. Airy beauty designed with the Arts & Crafts philosophy in mind, happens to be one of them. Read more »

Property’s Photo of the Week: A Forgotten Piece of Philly Off Roosevelt Boulevard

A photo posted by jen_es (@jen_es) on

Actually, there’s really nobody around at all, except a church a few blocks away and another lonely house standing in the middle of the acreage.

That snippet is from a 2012 Inquirer article on a family residing at Logan Triangle, a dejected piece of North Philadelphia land off Roosevelt Boulevard and a hot topic among Logan locals anxious to see it put to productive neighborhood use. Lamentably, to read the article’s description of the property then would be like reading a description of it today.

The thing is, it doesn’t have to be that way forever.

In case you missed it, neighbors met with city representatives over two weeks ago to discuss the future of the neglected 40-acre plot, which has been owned by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority since 2012. (Long-demolished homes that once stood there were sold off by former residents because “they were sinking into a forgotten creekbed“.)

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Farmhouse Friday: Posh Dwelling Features Passive Solar Designs, Rain-Fed Stream

TREND images via Brandywine Fine Properties Sotheby's International Realty

TREND images via Brandywine Fine Properties Sotheby’s International Realty

Trailing on the green heels of that beautiful – not to mention freshly price-chopped –  LEED Plantinum-certified Slusher Residence in Fairmount is this wonderfully unanticipated home: a $1.65 million stunner also with LEED approval. Unlike the Slusher Residence, however, it’s a farmhouse lounging on a freaking wildflower meadow in Kennett Square. Ahem, excuse us while we go Pin-crazy…

No, but seriously. This place is definitely worth a look, especially if you’re interested in living in a pastoral setting for the long-term without giving up superbly modern amenities. (If you don’t believe us, the gallery will likely convince you.)

For starters…

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