Philly Is the 3rd-Most Sinful City in the U.S., Per New Report

But there are some interesting facts contained in this cheeky, somewhat pointless ranking of cities. Atlantic City ranks No. 2.

sin-cities

The latest city ranking list is “Sin Cities and Saintly Sanctuaries.” It’s one of those cheeky lists that judges American cities in a variety of statistics, weights the rankings, adds them up and gives each city an overall score.

Trulia put out the sin city ranking, which lists Philadelphia as the third most-sinful city in the United States behind New Orleans and Atlantic City. It gave each city a ranking in the seven deadly sins: pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth. It’s not a scientific formula, in case you couldn’t figure this out.

But behind the silly rankings are some truths about Philadelphia, even if they’re expressed in weird ways.

Philly ranks high on the list because it’s No. 3 in envy and No. 2 in wrath. Envy was calculated by “the largest difference in home listing prices as a proportion of their median listing price” (Fairfield County, Connecticut and Detroit went 1-2). Wrath was the rate of violent crimes committed per capita (Memphis was first).

These are serious issues, and groups in Philly are working to combat violence and housing discrimination. So while it’s kind of cute that Philly ranked as the third-most sinful city, it’s not for fun reasons.

It seems weird to have these two categories roped in with a list that also ranks cities on their number of adult entertainment establishments — lust, of course. Atlantic City was first in that ranking, even beating out Las Vegas. Do AC, indeed. (Philly was 16th, which isn’t bad. The Gold Club is holding it down.)

Scranton, meanwhile, ranked second in gluttony (which combines rates for obesity, binge drinking, heavy drinking and smoking).

There’s not that much to take away about Philadelphia from the list, except that it still needs work in many areas. (You knew this already, though.) Also, Trulia is good at getting people to mention them in articles.

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