Conservatives Contemplating Chris Christie Comeback

Chris Christie's favorability ratings have swung in a positive direction in the last few months. Now conservatives are considering if he can make a comeback.

Christie 2016 campaign video

George Will, the longtime conservative commentator for the Washington Post, wrote a column last night saying that, after the terrorist attacks in Paris, there’s only one presidential candidate to turn to: Chris Christie.

Pitching Christie as an alternative to political neophytes Donald Trump, Ben Carson and Carly Fiorina — and as better than, I am not kidding here, the values expressed in John Lennon’s “Imagine” — Will writes that “no candidate in the Republican field can match Christie’s combination of a prosecutor’s bearing and a governor’s executive temperament.” Will then spends most of the column bashing Trump, which he’s done consistently.

In Will’s world, Christie is more of an alternative to Trump than a surefire presidential candidate, but no matter: The New Jersey governor needs everything he can get! And things may be turning. He was dropped to the JV debate, but his response to a question about drug addiction went viral.

And NJ.com notes Christie’s favorability ratings have reversed in Iowa and New Hampshire, the first two primary states. The conservative Daily Caller is floating question of a Christie comeback. Quick, conservatives: Hop on the bandwagon now so you can say you were on from the beginning!

Will cites a speech in Florida after the Paris attacks where Christie sounded much more presidential than his rivals. Since then, Christie has told John Kerry to “shut up” and come out against settling Syrian refugees, not even for war orphans: “I don’t think orphans under five are being, you know, should be admitted into the United States at this point.”

Considering current public opinion on the resettlement of Syrian war refugees in America, this could boost Christie’s favorability even higher. Unfortunately for him, his highest showing in a recent poll is still 4 percent.