Allen Iverson Biographer Kent Babb on “Tipsy” Practice Rant, Stephen A. Smith, Why A.I. Thrived in Philly

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Kent Babb wants to thank Stephen A. Smith.

“Whether he meant to or not,” says Babb, the author of Not a Game: The Incredible Rise and Unthinkable Fall of Allen Iverson, “he steered thousands of people toward my book.”

Last Friday, Smith used his clout as an ESPN pundit to criticize Babb, a sports features writer at The Washington Post, for his book’s claim that Iverson was “tipsy” during 2002’s “We’re talking about practice” rant.

“It’s a flat-out lie,” Smith, a former Philadelphia Inquirer sports columnist, proclaimed on First Take, also boasting that he had known Iverson for 19 years and had spoken to him that day. “This is an exercise in cruelty. Allen Iverson is retired,” he added. “Allen Iverson is not playing anymore. And you’re gonna literally sit there and talk about something that you believe happened over 12 years ago?”

Babb’s page-turning, heart-wrenching biography is about more than Iverson’s beloved (and possibly besotted) press conference monologue. It’s the sad story of a star now adrift, broke and alone. Babb recently shared his thoughts with Philadelphia on Smith’s take, what he wishes readers would focus on, and why Philly adored A.I. — with reservations. Read more »

The Five Most Surprising Moments from the New Allen Iverson Documentary

Tomorrow night marks the premiere of Showtime’s Iverson, a 90-minute documentary that traces Allen Iverson’s life from his childhood in the mean streets of Newport News to the day the Sixers lifted his #3 jersey to the rafters, through archival footage and a new one-on-one interview. Considering the project is executive produced by Gary Moore, Iverson’s longtime advisor and father figure, it’s also a more balanced view of his career and personal struggles than one might expect. For those who experienced the AI era as Sixers fans, following every game—along with all the controversies—much of the film plays more like a nostalgia trip than a revelation. But even die-hard fans of the Answer will find a few surprises. (And that time he crossed up Jordan!) Read more »

No, That Allen Iverson Quote Being Passed Around Isn’t Real

Yesterday, a quote from former Sixers guard Allen Iverson began to be passed around the Internet. It hit Facebook, it hit Twitter. National media members retweeted it. Thousands of people actually thought this quote was real:

Fake Allen Iverson quote

It’s not, obviously. Even more fun: The quote is from City Paper’s Bell Curve, the jokey news recap of the week.

It’s hilarious how many people thought this insanely fake quote was real. (To be fair, endless appetizers were introduced in 2014, so that part is plausible.)

The fake quote stems from a story Matt Barnes told in Sports Illustrated a month ago. When Barnes was on the Sixers for a season, he said Iverson used to throw “$30,000 to $40,000″ at the strip club every time they went. “I used to take my foot and scoop the shit under my chair and either re-throw it or put some in my pocket,” he told SI. Read more »

Ex-Teammate: Iverson Would Throw $40K on Stage at Strip Clubs

There’s a good profile of Los Angeles Clippers forward Matt Barnes in Sports Illustrated this week. Barnes is one of the most hated players in the NBA by opponents and one of the most beloved by his teammates. He’s works hard, he elbows opponents, he talks trash. He’s one of those grinders.

Barnes, who has played for eight NBA teams in his 11-year career, was with the Sixers during part of the team’s disastrous 2005-06 season. Barnes was in his third year when he played in Philadelphia, and spent just 50 games here. And in the story, he recounts hanging with Allen Iverson at a strip club in Philadelphia. (Iverson was legendary in the early 2000s among college kids in University City for frequenting Wizzards, now Atlantis, at 38th and Chestnut.)

“Allen was the first guy that showed me how NBA players spend money in strip clubs,” Barnes tells SI. “That guy went. HARD. He’d throw so much money, and this was when I was first in the league, that I used to take my foot and scoop the s— under my chair and either re-throw it or put some in my pocket. He’d throw $30,000, $40,000 every time we went. I’m like, ‘You realize what I can do with this money?’” Read more »

Sold for $2.19 Million: Allen Iverson’s Former Villanova Home

Allen Iverson former VIllanova home

TREND photo via Fox & Roach.

At one time, this sprawling Villanova estate used to boast “The Answer” in its elegant halls. However, in 2007, Iverson sold the property to one John Scardapane, the CEO of Saladworks. Now, the home, which was listed in May of last year, has been sold yet again. (Or rather, some weeks ago in mid-December, according to Zillow.)

We’re not sure who purchased the property, but what is for certain is they’ll probably be living the luxe life for sure: two-story reception hall,“restaurant-quality” bar, library, home theatre and a separate apartment  that comes with a kitchenette and private entrance. The estate also has a saltwater pool and severeal terraces.

Click here to see the gallery!

Allen Iverson’s Former Villanova Estate Is for Sale

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This five-bedroom estate would be desirable enough without a celebrity pedigree but there will no doubt be bidders who want to say they own The Answer’s old estate. A.I. sold the home to Saladworks CEO John Scardapane in 2007 and as of this week, the estate is on the market again.

Clocking in at practically 13,000 square feet, the estate is palatial and has amenities to match. It offers five bedrooms, nine full bathrooms, a separate apartment with kitchenette, a “restaurant-quality” bar, a library, a gym and a home theater. And that’s just the interior.

Read more »

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