In Praise of the Philly Stoop

Two women sit on the stoop at 1308 Lombard Street in 1913. Photo from PhillyHistory.org, a project of the Philadelphia Department of Records

Over the next few weeks, as the weather in the Delaware Valley makes its slow, humid descent from gloriously sun-kissed to armpit-soakingly swampy, you, dear reader, will find yourself overwhelmed with the desire to get away. And you will have options. There will be no shortage of articles and news segments advising you of the multitudinous places you can get away to. And sure, jet off to the French Riviera, Rich Uncle Pennybags, if that’s where your bliss — and your rewards card — takes you. But I posit that this year, the best summer spot is much closer. And I’m not even talking about the Shore.

I’m talking about the stoop. Everyone has one. It’s at once impossibly ordinary — it’s the steps to your door, duh — and grand — per urbanist saint Jane Jacobs, the basic building block of community, the perch for her famous “eyes upon the street.”

In a year when social media has made us increasingly antisocial and politics have rendered us hopelessly divided, it’s time for a re-appreciation of the humble stoop and the centuries-old tradition of hangin’ out on it. Read more »

This Make-Ahead Oatmeal Saved Our Lives

If I’m going to be honest, I’ll admit that I’d always seen oatmeal as the homework of breakfast. On one hand, It’s definitely the healthiest option on the brunch menu; on the other hand, it’s oatmeal: mushy, squishy, gooey-gluey. I’d never chosen to eat oatmeal (cookies notwithstanding) without a twinge of oughta reverberating in my frontal cortex.

Then one day my pregnant wife sent me a recipe from The Kitchn for oatmeal that you can — get this — make a whole week’s worth of at once. It seemed, honestly, insane. “That’s bonkers!” I thought. “Wouldn’t it just turn into a giant cauldron of pasty gloop?” Memories of dining halls and motel breakfasts flooded into my head. I was not a believer. I ignored the ridiculous recipe. My wife rolled her eyes.

Then she and I welcomed our first child — and along with the transcendent joy of snoogling with your just-born progeny came the crippling sleep insecurity that accompanies a squalling newborn. All of a sudden, the idea of making, like, five days of hearty breakfasts in one shot was super appealing. In an act of groggy desperation, I retrieved that recipe from my chat history and prepared to disregard the laws of grain physics as I understood them. I forced myself to believe that cooked oatmeal might not turn to gruel over the course of a week. Read more »

The Case for Philly Statehood

Illustration by GlueKit

Illustration by Gluekit

Back in July, as the world was reeling from the U.K.’s Brexit vote, Harper Polling asked Pennsylvanians which part of the state they’d like to see exit the Commonwealth. Half of respondents weren’t sure, but nearly-two thirds of those who were said it should be “Philadelphia and the Southeast.”

Let’s start with the obvious: The Philly region will never become a state. Ever. Legislators in Harrisburg wouldn’t let its southeastern population center and economic engine ghost. Nor would a Republican-controlled U.S. Congress admit a new, predominantly Democratic state to the union. But that doesn’t mean Philly, and what have become its increasingly like-minded surrounding counties, couldn’t go it alone.  Read more »

Ed Rendell: Sorry About that “Ugly Women” Comment

rendell

Yesterday we told you about how Ed Rendell put his foot in his mouth while trying to explain why he thought Donald Trump‘s comments about women, particularly his observations about bosom size as it relates to attractiveness, will hurt the presumptive Republican nominee with women voters:

“Trump’s comments like ‘You can’t be a 10 if you’re flat-chested,’ that’ll come back to haunt him. There are probably more ugly women in America than attractive women. People take that stuff personally,” said Rendell, a noted Hillary Clinton supporter, to a Washington Post reporter who was probing Trump’s chances and appeal in Philadelphia’s suburbs.

The quote went super viral while Rendell was in Washington, D.C., for Infrastructure Week. Reporters were waiting for Rendell when he got off the train at 30th Street Station yesterday afternoon. Read more »

WATCH: 60 Minutes Profiles Temple Prof Wrongly Accused of Spying

Last May, the Department of Justice dropped a bombshell when it announced charges against Temple physics chair Xiaoxing Xi. The allegation: The Chinese-born scientist was alleged to be passing top-secret technology — something called a “pocket heater” — along to China. He was demoted from his position at Temple and generally shamed. Then, four months later, the DOJ quietly, and with no explanation, dropped the charges against him. According to the New York Times, federal prosecutors didn’t understand the science. Whoops!

Last night, nearly one year after federal agents with guns and bulletproof vests barged into his home around sunrise and handcuffed him, 60 Minutes profiled Xi and Sherry Chen, another Chinese-born scientist accused and then cleared of spying for China in a segment called “Collateral Damage.” Read more »

Here’s Hillary Clinton’s Philly Victory Speech

HILLARY-CLINTON-Philadelphia-940x540

Hillary Clinton won the Pennsylvania Primary on Tuesday, and she took her victory lap at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, flanked by the Pennsylvania politicians who’ve been flanking her all along. Hey, Jim Kenney! Yo, Tom Wolf! What’s up, Bob Casey! She spoke to a raucous crowd who often interrupted with chants of “Hillary! Hillary!”

The former Secretary of State delivered a speech very much in line with what she’d been saying at her Philly stops in the last week. She focused on Donald Trump, and responded specifically to his claims that she was playing gender politics.

“Now, the other day, Mr. Trump accused me of playing the, quote, ​’ woman card. ​’​ Well, if fighting for women’s health care and paid family leave and equal pay is playing the ​’​ woman card, ​’​ then deal me in,” she said to applause.

Clinton also attempted to mend fences with supporters of Bernie Sanders. “Whether you support Senator Sanders or you support me, there’s much more that unites us than divides us. We all agree that wages are too low and inequality is too high,” she said, lobbing a few grenades at Wall Street for good measure.

And, of course, she vowed to return in July for the Democratic National Convention.

Read Clinton’s full speech below: Read more »

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders Will Both Be in Philly Tonight

Photos | iStockphoto.com

Photos | iStockphoto.com

The Pennsylvania primary is tomorrow. Maybe you’ve heard. And things are getting hectic here in Philadelphia.

Four presidential contenders will be in the Philly area today.

On the heels of news that Ted Cruz and John Kasich are essentially teaming up to deny Donald Trump the delegates needed to secure the nomination, Trump is scheduled to hold a rally at West Chester University. That madness will go down at 4 p.m. before Trump heads to Wilkes-Barre in the evening. (Cruz is moving on to Indiana and Nebraska; Kasich is expected to be at the Penrose Diner in South Philly at 10 this morning before heading to Rockville, Maryland, and then Pittsburgh suburb McKees Rocks.) More than 5,000 people have signed a petition asking that Trump not be allowed to hold his rally there.

On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton will hold a rally at 7:15 p.m. tonight in the City Hall courtyard (it’s good to have the backing of the mayor); the doors for that event open at 5:15. Bernie Sanders, meanwhile, will hold a rally at Drexel University’s Daskalakis Athletic Center at 8 p.m., doors at 6; he’s expected to be joined by actors Susan Sarandon and Kendrick Sampson. The events are both free and open to the public, but RSVPs are recommended. Clinton has been leading Sanders in the polls and appears to have more or less pivoted toward the general election. That hasn’t stopped Sanders from doubling down, as the Vermont senator has gone hyper-local, making Mayor Jim Kenney‘s proposed soda tax a national campaign issue; he wrote about it in an exclusive Philadelphia magazine opinion piece yesterday, arguing that the tax will disproportionately impact poor and middle class citizens.

Of course, there’s much more at stake for Philadelphia in tomorrow’s primary beyond the presidential race. There’s the battle between Chaka Fattah and Dwight Evans, Montgomery County’s Josh Shapiro’s quest to become the nominee for Attorney General, a U.S. Senate primary where the Democratic winner will challenge Pat Toomey, ballot questions and a whole lot of other local races of import. You can find out just about everything you need to know about voting tomorrow in our No-Bullshit Guide to the 2016 Philadelphia Primary.

Kenney Bans City-Funded Travel to North Carolina, Mississippi

Mayor Jim Kenney is placing a ban on non-essential city-funded travel to the states of North Carolina and Mississippi, Nellie Fitzpatrick, the city’s director of LGBT affairs, announced at a City Hall press conference Wednesday afternoon. The ban is in response to controversial new laws in those states — North Carolina’s H.B. 2 and Mississippi’s H.B. 1523 — that limit protections on LGBT persons.

Fitzpatrick made the announcement flanked by Pennsylvania Physician General Rachel Levine, who was in the city to discuss the importance of passing statewide non-discrimination legislation in the wake of Governor Wolf’s executive orders, and Rue Landau, executive director of the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations.

“Mayor Kenney has repeatedly stated that discriminatory legislation is antithetical to our country’s core democratic values and continues to actively welcome any and all people, businesses, organizations, and events who no longer feel welcome in their state because of these idiotic laws,” said Fitzpatrick in her prepared remarks. “You will always be welcome in Philadelphia. Speaking frankly, if you are seeking to make a statement by leaving your state, coming to Philadelphia is your exclamation point. Since being founded in 1682 on the principles of love and acceptance for all people, this city has been a beacon for everyone seeking a life free of the discrimination they faced elsewhere.”

Read more »

« Older Posts