Eat This Now: Jersey Corn

The super-sweet, perfectly tender ears are in season, and there are way-better-for-you ways to eat them than regular old butter and salt. Check out six recipes from the area’s smartest chefs

Jersey corn is not only a signifier of summer, but it’s also a vitamin-packed addition to your barbeque. One ear contains nearly 25 percent of the B1 you need in a day, and it’s also a good source of folate, fiber, and vitamin C. But whether you grill it, boil it, or broil it, topping it with a healthier fat like olive oil or flaxseed oil — or simply eating it straight-up plain — is way better than slathering it in butter. Check out the recipes below from area chefs for some corn-spiration you can take to the kitchen.


Grilled Corn With Olive Oil

From Horizons

Corn on the cob, however many ears you need
Olive oil, to taste
Salt, to taste

1. Shuck the corn.
2. Drop in boiling salted water for 5 minutes (boiling first helps keep the corn juicy; putting raw corn on the grill can dry it out and make it tough).
3. Remove and let cool at room temperature.
5. Brush lightly with extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Make sure to brush the olive oil on sparingly, for if it drips off the corn while grilling, it can cause a flare.
6. Grill on high heat for 5 minutes, turning at least three times for even marks.

 

Grilled Corn With Old Bay Glaze
From Supper

8 ears of corn
½ cup olive oil
1 Tbsp Old Bay
½ Tbsp garlic powder

1. Combine all ingredients except for the corn in a bowl and mix well.
2. Pull back husks of corn like a banana and remove the silk. Put the husks back together and soak the corn in warm water for 2 hours.
3. Place the corn on the grill at a low temperature for 25-30 minutes, turning the corn every few minutes until the husks are dry and charred.
4. Remove husks, brush the Old Bay mixture onto the corn, and serve.

Grilled Corn With Vegan Chipotle Mayo
From Horizons

8-10 ears of corn
1 cup vegan mayo
1 tsp wet chipotle puree from a can or dry chipotle powder
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper

Mix well and slather onto the corn once it’s grilled. Serve.

 

Corn Succotash
From Supper

Serves 6

1 cup corn kernels, cut from cob
1 cup okra
1 cup edamame beans
1 cup carrots
1 cup red peppers
½ jalapeño, with seeds, diced (optional)
2 Tbsp olive oil
Pinch of garlic
Basil, to taste
Thyme, to taste

1. Warm a saucepan with olive oil.
2. In the pan, combine corn, okra, edamame beans, carrots, fresh red pepper, and a pinch of garlic (jalapeños can also be added for spice).
3. Sautee the vegetables on medium heat for approximately 3-5 minutes until cooked but not browned
4. Sprinkle with basil and thyme to taste.

 

Grilled Corn With Seashore “Butter”
From Horizons

8-10 ears of corn
1/2 cup roasted garlic cloves
2 tsp Old Bay seasoning
2 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp fresh chopped dill
1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice
1/2 Tbsp Dijon or whole grain mustard
Pinch of sugar (optional)

Puree all ingredients in a food processor. Brush over grilled corn and serve.

 

Blackened Corn & Fava Bean Succotash
From Noble American Cookery

2 cups corn kernels, cut from cob
2 cups fava beans, shucked
2 red bell peppers
½ red onion, shaved
1 jalapeño, seeded, very small dice
1 tsp lime juice
1 tsp lemon juice
6 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup cilantro leaves, washed and dried
2 tsp tarragon leaves, washed and dried
2 tsp marjoram leaves, washed and dried

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and blanch the fava beans, still in their skins, for approximately one minute. Remove them as they reach the peak of their color.
2. Immediately strain and place in an ice bath to refresh. Drain, peel, and refrigerate the beans.
3. Rub the red bell peppers with a small amount of olive oil and grill, rotating occasionally, until the skin is well charred (approximately 5-10 minutes).
4. Immediately place in a heat-proof bowl and cover with plastic wrap to contain the heat.
5. Once cool enough to handle, seed and peel.
6. Small dice the fire-roasted peppers and then place in the refrigerator.
7. Put a heavy skillet, preferably cast iron, over a high flame until smoking. Add a small amount of oil and quickly add the corn. Occasionally toss the pan to ensure even blackening.
8. Once charred, remove the corn to a pan or plate to cool.
9. Combine all the vegetables and herbs together in a bowl and add lemon juice, lime juice, and olive oil.
10. Season with salt and fresh cracked black pepper and serve.

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  • Margaret

    Succotash lovers use lima beans, not favas. Fresh lima beans are at farmers' markets right now. YUM!