Why You Shouldn’t Hire a Personal Trainer

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Don’t get me wrong, I believe a personal trainer can be a tremendous asset in whatever fitness goal you may have. Trainers can serve as a motivator, an educator and a source of accountability. They can be the difference between failure and success, and can help their clients learn lifestyle changes that can improve their health for the rest of their lives.

However, there are a few reasons NOT to hire a personal trainer. I should know—I am a personal trainer.




Here are four reasons you shouldn't hire a personal trainer.

1. You want a quick fix.

Results happen slowly over a period of time and shouldn't be expected overnight. If at any time you’re presented with a “solution” that will work instantly, whether it be from a personal trainer, weight loss coach or doctor, you should immediately be suspicious. Anyone who claims to have a program or product that will help you lose twenty pounds in two weeks is implementing dangerous shortcuts that can do much more damage than good in the long run. Results that last come from changes that last.

2. You think we have a special secret that no one else knows.

Sometimes, there is some pretty complicated science behind nutrition planning and exercise programming. However, the knowledge that a personal trainer will give you is no secret.  The “secret” is simple: Eat the right amount of healthy foods, do the right exercises, give your best effort, and make sure to get ample rest. It’s that simple. A trainer will be able to give you that knowledge but don’t expect to hear something you've never heard before.

3. You’re not willing to change.

Let’s face it, you’re out of shape because you have been doing something wrong.  So if you’re going to continue to be stubborn and not make a change to your diet or not change the way you work out, then you’re going to continue to remain the same.  When you do the same things over and over, expect the same old results. If you’re going to enlist the services of a professional and not take their advice, what’s the point?

4. You’re not going to do any work outside of your sessions.

In order to see results, you’re going to have to work out on your own time when you’re not with your trainer (unless you’re willing to spend the money to train three to five times per week).  If you think you’re going to get in shape JUST by the one-to-two-hours per week you work with your trainer, you’re in for a rude awakening. Getting in shape takes regular exercise and a proper nutrition plan.  If you do have a trainer and don’t have the finances to train frequently, talk to them to devise an exercise program you can do on your own when you don’t meet together.

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Brian Maher is a personal trainer in Center City Philadelphia who specializes in weight loss and nutritional counseling. He is the owner of Philly Personal Training, a company offering convenient in-home personal training packages to busy individuals looking to improve their fitness levels.  Read all of Brian’s posts for Be Well Philly here.

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  • http://LucasJamesPersonalTraining.com/ Lucas James

    Interesting article and I do agree on most of the points discussed. A new client needs to understand he or she has to make their health a priority and be committed and consistent to their trainer’s program. Keep in mind, abs are made in the kitchen – not in the gym.

    Lucas James
    Celebrity Personal Trainer

  • http://www.passionateaboutfitness.com lorna

    Great article! Check out an article I wrote about what to look for in a personal trainer at http://www.passionateaboutfitness.com