Study: Miranda Kerr’s Sex Actually Doesn’t Sell

A research team recently discovered that female shoppers are turned off by product ads that feature skinny models and celebrities.

Miranda Kerr

Alright, Be Well readers. You tell me: When it comes to advertisements, are skinny models a reason to buy or a reason to bellyache? Daily Mail reports the latter, according to the latest research from the UK’s Warwick Business School.

In the study, female participants were shown magazine pages that contained an advertisement for vodka; the first group of women received an ad that didn’t feature an attractive model, another group received an ad with a large photo of a model in her bikini (uh-oh, I see where this is going … ) and the final group was shown an image of a model positioned next to the vodka.

The study concluded that products placed next to large-scale images of female models and celebrities such as Miranda Kerr or Irina Shayk are likely to rub female shoppers the wrong way. Instead of persuading women to buy these products because obviously the product will make them awesome and famous, too, researchers say an attractive model triggers a coping mechanism in women—you guessed it: scornto give their own ego a boost.

Meanwhile, using subtle images of pretty faces and tiny waists will do the opposite; shoppers will assess themselves negatively but they will not hold the model or celebrity in contempt—resulting in a sales increase.

What do you think: Is it time for advertising execs to let old habits die, or should we let Miranda Kerr keep her job? Share in the comments, please.

Photo: Joe Seer / Shutterstock.com

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