Spotted: Philly’s Cityscape Captured Through Paper Sculptures

A photo posted by Drew Leshko (@drewleshko) on

Philadelphia-based artist Drew Leshko is doing something really cool. Using paper and wood, he carves, cuts, and layers the materials to create replicas of buildings, news stands, and other features in his neighborhood. His raison d’être? His artist statement makes it clear:

… Leshko creates documentary studies of architecture from his neighborhood in an attempt to create a three dimensional archive of buildings that are in transitional periods. The work examines gentrification and history, how historical relevance is determined, and most importantly, what is worth preserving.

The paper sculptures – done at a 1:12 scale, we might add – are crafted from observation and photographs, with Leshko not shying away from minute details like city detritus and acid rain deposits. We’ve included photos of some of his pieces from his Instagram below, although you can see eleven of the seventeen in person.

Read more »

Jaw Dropper of the Week: Retro Oasis Tucked Away in South Jersey

TREND images via Coldwell Banker Preferred

TREND images via Coldwell Banker Preferred

Designing a home to meet your particular vision must be kind of fun, don’t you think? In the case of this South Jersey residence, it seems whoever had a say in its look was at least partially influenced by the modern aesthetics of the seventies (indeed, agent Kathleen McNamara tells us it was built circa 1978) and the light-friendly appeal of hotel suites.

Oh, did we mention it has swimming pool and deck with lounge space?

Located on a one-acre lot in Cherry Hill’s Wilderness Acres neighborhood, the John J. Olivieri-designed home features oak flooring, two functioning fireplaces (one gas; one wood), and walls of windows throughout. A two-story foyer awaits near the entrance and the kitchen, festooned with cherry cabinets and granite counters, opens to a two-story dining area with windows overlooking the pool area.

Read more »

WATCH: A View of Philadelphia Like You’ve Never Seen It Before

It might be blasphemous to say, but much like living with complex human beings, sometimes Philadelphia can be a total pain in the derriere. It’s a city rife with struggle, ugliness, and crime; but also hope, beauty, and folks who will reach out to help you on instinct.

The latter description can be one that falls by the wayside for some of us who’ve lived here long enough. Oddly enough, we didn’t realize this until after having watched Cory J. Popp’s “Philadelphia From Above” video, which made us fall in complete and utter love with the city once more.

Read more »

Trinity Tuesday: Classic Restoration in Queen Village Features Modern Upgrades

TREND images via BHHS Fox & Roach-Center City Walnut

TREND images via BHHS Fox & Roach-Center City Walnut

Clocking in at 633 square feet, this three-story residence is as adorable as you might expect. Unlike some of its aged brethren, however, this little trinity in Queen Village was renovated in 2010 and is “an amazing restoration,” according to agent Josh Allen.

Updates include all new windows, high-end lighting, and reclaimed wood floors. Even the front door is new. Also on the first level are custom bookshelves, period wainscoting, and cabinets for if you want to keep all those TV and video game accessories out of the way. The kitchen and bathroom are both located on the second level and boast Carrara marble, the former of which comes with custom cabinetry, Liebherr fridge, and Wolf range with a vented hood. Back downstairs, the unfinished basement is used for storage.

Read more »

Go Green: Temple Offers Sneak Peek at “Verdant” Master Plan

Image by LRSLA studio Inc. via Temple News

Image by LRSLA studio Inc. via Temple News

Will Temple University ever build that much-whispered about football stadium everyone thinks they’re planning? Speculate all you want, it honestly doesn’t seem like the Owls are even thinking about that at this point. Instead, all signs point to the school buckling down on prepping for the upcoming green redesign of its main campus.

Visualize Temple, TU’s Campus Master Plan (.PDF), which came to our attention last December, will involve the demolition of Barton Hall, Beury Hall, and the Biology-Life Sciences building. Taking their respective places would be a new 210,000-square-foot library designed by Norwegian architect Snøhetta and Philadelphia-based Stantec, where Barton now stands, and a massive central green space – informally referred to as “the quad” –, where Beury Beach, its namesake hall and the Bio-Life building are currently located.

Other projects would also be phased in within the next five or so years, according to an October article from Temple News, including an interdisciplinary science building at 12th and Norris. This latter construction would be the only other structure slightly stepping out of Temple’s footprint, which university officials stress they have no plans to expand.

Complementing Visualize Temple is Verdant Temple, the university’s landscape master plan, which launched its pilot project at Temple’s Liacouras Walk and Wachman Plaza a little over a week ago. According to Temple News’ Brandon Lausch, work at the site will pave the way for “more social space” and better accessibility to Wachman Hall with the rest of campus.

It also serves as preview of what’s to come.

Read more »

Main Line Monday: Greta Garbo Might Have Lived in This Gladwyne Manse If …

TREND images via Zillow.com

TREND images via Zillow.com

When it comes down to it, Greta Garbo really might have lived in any one of the Main Line’s grand mansions had she elected to grace the area with her presence every now and then. But according to hearsay that’s been passed down through the decades, “River House,” a Schuylkill River-side residence in Gladwyne, this is the one she might have lived in. Per the listing:

Legend has it that “River House” was built for Leopold Stokowski, director of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and his lover, famed film star, Greta Garbo, but following a disagreement, they never acquired the home.

We can’t vouch for that conjecture, but it is true that Stokowski and Garbo appeared to have been friends and travel companions.  In any case, River House went on to belong to another set of artistic types, in this case Helen Tyson Madeira and Louis C. Madeira IV. The Madeiras, who purchased the property in 1940, lived there “for nearly three-quarters of a century.” Now, the home is on the market for the first time since they acquired it.

Read more »

Property’s Photo of the Week: It’s a Beautiful Day in the Gayborhood

The sky may not be in the sunniest of spirits and our Photo of the Week pick, shot by photographer Jason Coopman who shares amazing photos on Instagram, looks to have been taken yesterday, but there’s just something a little extra special about today.

We think you know what it is, but we’ll just leave this shot of the newly added rainbow crosswalks at Locust and 13th to give you an idea. I mean, it’s certainly a beautiful day to be in the Gayborhood.

Read more »

Farmhouse Friday: Trunnel Hyll, New Hope’s Coolest Barn Reconstruction

TREND images via Zillow.com

TREND images via Zillow.com

Ah, Trunnel Hyll. How exactly did this stand-out residence in the middle of New Hope come to be, you ask? Well, according to the listing, Worthington Construction is responsible for this neat fusion of period barn structures. (And you know we love country-style renovations!)

The property’s unique architecture is one thing, but the fact of the matter is it was also constructed, wherever possible, with natural and energy-efficient products and systems. The home features, for example, a state of the art geothermal heating and cooling system, which essentially lowers the cost of winter heating and summer cooling for you. Pretty sweet, right?

Read more »

South Philly ReStore to Get Two-Day Grand Opening with “Fun Day” Events

940 x 540 - restore-rendering copy

Image via Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia blog

Its celebratory, two-part introduction to Point Breeze isn’t the only reason for why you should be getting pumped about the new Habitat for Humanity ReStore at 2318 Washington Avenue. Real estate-wise, the 17,000-square-foot facility is anticipated to be a little gold nugget that will add to the neighborhood in more ways than one.

Indeed, Deputy Mayor for Economic Development Alan Greenberger, who is set to discuss economic development along Washington Avenue and the jobs this particular store will bring during tomorrow’s ribbon-cutting, believes the new South Philadelphia ReStore is “sure to be so much more than a great new place to shop in Point Breeze.”

In addition to occupying a previously vacant building and potentially stimulating more economic activity on the avenue, the ReStore will offer locals a place to donate gently-used home goods and acquire low-cost building materials, while also furthering Habitat’s mission of providing affordable housing to those who need it. All proceeds from the store will go “towards the building and repairing of homes,” said Greenberger, per a press release.

Read more »

« Older Posts