Fairness Argument With DeSean a Tough Sell

kelly_jackson940

The timing was curious, to say the least.

At 12:05 p.m. on March 28, NJ.com published a story saying the Eagles were concerned with DeSean Jackson’s alleged ties to gang members. At 12:40, the Eagles sent out a 25-word statement saying they had released the wide receiver.




And then silence. For 30 days.

The strategy seemed obvious. Use the gang affiliation story as cover for what would be deemed a peculiar and unpopular decision by many. Yet the way the team's brass explains it, the Eagles were actually doing Jackson a favor by releasing him when they did.

"I just feel that way that I think players should be allowed to negotiate," said Chip Kelly during the team's annual playground build at Prince Hall Elementary School in North Philadelphia. "The closer you get to the draft, we could have waited until June, but then what are his opportunities? So that’s not the way we’re gonna be. We did it last year with Cullen Jenkins and Mike Patterson. And we did it with Jason Avant when we knew where we were going and what direction we were going in. And I think it’s the only fair way to do it. We obviously listened, but we didn’t have anything so we moved on."

Added Jeffrey Lurie: "We could have waited until after the draft. We could have waited until OTAs. We could have waited until the beginning of training camp. We wanted to give the player the best chance to find the best possible arrangement he could. And that’s really all it is. It’s so much better not to comment publicly on why a player… why you want to go in a different way. It’s not fair. they prepare hard. They’ve worked well with you. They’ve been successful working with you. Why then when you release say something that’s not appropriate or positive?"

That last part is understandable. No one was expecting Lurie, Kelly or Howie Roseman to come out and publicly rip Jackson yesterday.

But the idea that they were trying to be fair to him in the way they handled his release seems disingenuous.

"I don’t know when that report was released or whatever," Kelly said. "We were made aware of that report earlier than that, but that had nothing to do with it. The things that happened I think in 2009 and 2011 before I ever got here, and when you read it, I don’t know what he did wrong when you read that article."

So the timing of the release was purely coincidental?

"I can’t tell you that. The timing was exactly when we got back from the owners’ meetings is what the timing was for us."

Added Roseman: "As we discussed, that decision certainly wasn’t at all based on that article. It was part of our offseason plan about going forward and what we felt we had to do for the best interest of our football team and our organization.

"I think it was also important, and we talk to our players about being fair to them and giving them an opportunity to latch on somewhere. And so I think there were a variety of reasons why we made all these moves and the time that we made them."

In reality, the NJ.com article had little or nothing to do with Jackson's release. But the fact that the Eagles seemed to be using it as cover deserves to be questioned.

In the end, the decision to part ways with Jackson was Kelly's call. Lurie made that clear.

But the way the Eagles went about gauging trade interest is unclear. The message from the team Monday was that it received no offers, largely because of Jackson's contract. And there's no doubt that money played a big role.

Then again, if the decision to get rid of Jackson was made right after the season ended, why not try to work out a trade before the free agency period when teams had more money to spend? Instead, the Eagles searched for offers at the owners meetings in March and failed to attract any suitors. By that time, many around the league were hesitant to give anything up, knowing Jackson would likely end up being released.

Asked if he could have done anything differently to acquire some compensation for Jackson, Roseman said: "I’m comfortable with the process. It’s never perfect here in the offseason. The plans never go exactly the way you want unfortunately. Through that, I think we’ve gotta look forward and look towards what we’re trying to do here and what we’re trying to build. And again, we’re not trying to build something for one year. We’re trying to be a good football team over a period of time. And with that, it’s trying to put pieces of the puzzle together. And unfortunately when you’re managing a team in the NFL and the amount of resources you get in terms of salary cap and the players who come up in terms of contracts, you’ve gotta make decisions and you’ve gotta figure out how you’re trying to build a team and where you’re gonna put resources. And our offseason is part of that."

Jackson of course eventually signed with the Redskins. He took a pay cut, but still ended up with $16 million guaranteed.

"We’ve never been afraid of teams in our division," Lurie said. "We’ve gotta do what’s best for us and it remains to be seen exactly what happens in the future. We’ll check back in three years and see where we’re at."

Be respectful of our online community and contribute to an engaging conversation. We reserve the right to ban impersonators and remove comments that contain personal attacks, threats, or profanity, or are flat-out offensive. By posting here, you are permitting Philadelphia magazine and Metro Corp. to edit and republish your comment in all media.

  • Richard Colton

    I never believed the timing was coincidental. It was the nail in the “trade DeSean” coffin. Once they realized there weren’t any takers, the NJ.com story certainly wasn’t going to improve his trade value. It’s clear to me that the decision to move on from DeSean was made well before the story broke.

    Here’s what I believe, but will never be able to prove: It wasn’t a “football decision.” If DeSean played and practiced like Avant, he’d still be an Eagle.

    • MoreViolence

      I think more along the lines that if he was ” Paid and Practiced” like Avant. He’d still be here.

    • JAMIN67

      And the point is that if they’re weren’t any serious offers PRIOR to the article coming out, there sure as hell wasn’t going to be any after.

    • Ark87

      Yeah it’s almost insulting how bogus it all is. They need to keep their mouths shut. Really, you’re going to insist money was no object, no personality clashes, nothin but x’s and o’s….why not keep him on the team as the back-up/punt specialist, it’s not about money right? He’s not the type of player that would be disgruntled about being benched right (personality is no issue!)? If Mac blew out his ACL again, is the team really better off x’s and o’s wise with Jeff Maehl stepping up? Come on, you didn’t need to say anything, we get it, you’re just setting yourself up to get bit in the ass down the road.

      • Richard Colton

        Chip and Howie dung themselves a bit of a hole here – offensively and credibility wise. We’ll see. I’m hopeful that some combination of Sproles, Ertz, Maclin, and a draft pick or two can replace his production. If that fails to happen, they’ll have to answer for it.

        • Tom W

          Yep get out the pitchforks! Geez little loyalty would be nice not just a rush to crucify if it doesn’t pan out exactly right. He didn’t fit what they wanted to do … That includes everything scheme money character work ethic use size blocking etc. Fine w me. Saw last four games of the year that defenses had adjusted and taken Jackson outta the offense. Chip gets maclin cooper and rookie stud for same price as Jackson. Fine w me.

          • Richard Colton

            I’m generally OK with that, provided they have a plan and it works. Results oriented business. Right now – their plan doesn’t make much sense to me.

          • dnabrice

            With the tougher schedule, I think it’s very possible they take a step back and end up 9-7 this year. This year is going to be a lot tougher to prove that plan than last year.

          • aub32

            Last 4 games? You do know MIN was part of the last 4 games. I didn’t know that keeping a WR at only 195 yards was taking him out of the game. I have been over the Saints game time and again. Foles struggled, and Jackson can’t throw the ball to himself.

          • Philly0312

            MIN…where he created a turnover that should not have happened, and he played against the worst CB tandem in the league.

          • Rick H

            Absolutely correct!!! Whether the Eagles organization explained or not the media approached them like prosecutors yesterday. It is a joke!
            The most ridiculous part of all of this is the blatantly evident fact that Jackson was/is a punk/quitter… Why not approach Jackson with 20 plus beat writers and pummel him with questions??? Then you would see a major meltdown by Jackson and everyone would see what the Eagles were dealing with day in and day out.
            Ha Media go attack Jackson the same way you went after Lurie/Kelly & Roseman. NO, Jackson runs for for cover and gets a incompetent black racist Stephen Smith to ask lollipop questions to him while Jackson makes himself look like innocent Piondexter! Truly one of the biggest racist there in the low life ESPN section. Smith’s track record is worse then Al Sharpton.
            Again I ask the media to confront Jackson over and over to see him crack…

          • Richard Colton

            dude…

          • Rick H

            Dude I will never be part of the apologist generation! Today Sterling got what he deserved in the NBA. I want the playing field level 24/7/365. I can not handle the superficial coverups of individuals. We need people in the media with backbones.
            If you do not think Smith is a racist to some research. If you can’t tell that Jackson is a punk/quitter/liar then go to social media and it is blatantly obvious.
            Would you want Jackson on your team NOW? How much do you think the league and the Eagles REALLY KNOW about Jackson?
            If Smith were white he couldn’t find a job! I am in NO WAY SHAPE OR FORM a racist and not one person of my large family would e tolerated if they were. However I am not going to allow for this “running scared attitude” to exist in my life.
            My 35 plus years as an independent business owner of multiple companies will prove that. I hired and hire everyone. I treat people for who they are but I will not play games.

        • dnabrice

          Having said that though, it ultimately comes down to wins. We don’t need to be a top 3 offense if the defense gets better.

          • Richard Colton

            agreed. but if you’re going to cut your second best offensive playmaker AFTER the height of the FA season and without his replacement already on the team…that’s too much risk. If the Eagles win fewer games, OK – lots of variables in football. If their offense is worse because they didn’t replace Jackson’s production, Chip is at fault.

      • pjcostello

        They couldn’t do that, they’d lose the locker room completely!! Once they decided he had to go, and discovered they couldn’t get anything for him in a trade, he had to go.

        • Ark87

          But PJ, the locker room had nothing to do with it. Pure X’s and O’s.

      • Kev_H

        I don’t think Jackson has the physical ability to play WR the way Kelly wants it played. He can scheme around it, as he did last year, and play to Jackson’s strengths, but Kelly obviously found that to be limiting the team. So in football coach world, you get players who can do what you want them to do, and back them up with guys who can carry out the same tasks. What you suggest is that the Eagles could play offense the way Kelly wants to play and then if a wide receiver goes down, they can play a different offense.

        Taken to its extreme, the coach should have a different scheme for every player- back up Lane Johnson with a strong player who has a completely different skill set, and then be ready to run a different offense should Lane get hurt. That doesn’t sound like it would work well outside of a playground.

        • Ark87

          I suggest the offense can be the most explosive offense in the league, and second overall only the the statistically greatest offense of all time with Jackson. Jackson greatly contributed to that. It simply isn’t a big enough problem to cut someone for alone. He wasn’t holding you back *that* much. Ah the blocking. Mobile QB’s help the running game as well, helps unpack those 8 guys in the box if some are watching for a legitimate running threat who might bust out the side. But at the end of the day chip understands the QB’s primary role for helping the run game is having an effective passing game. It’s not ideal, but you work with what you can get.

        • aub32

          Jackson was limiting the team with 1300+ yards and being lined up all over the field. I can’t even imagine what his replacement will be capable of.

          • Kev_H

            Like I wrote, that’s obviously what Kelly thought. People like to say defenses have to account for DeSean (they have to account for everybody), but they overlook that the offense often had to scheme for ways to get DeSean open. It seems reasonable that lining up 4 guys who can each beat you 4 ways is more formidable than 3 guys who can beat you 4 ways and one who is a deep threat and can beat you fewer than 4 ways.

          • aub32

            What??? Are you somehow implying that we have or will have 4 pass catchers on this team that can do more than DeSean? DJax was the best pass catcher on this team. He wasn’t just a deep threat guy. How could have paid even the slightest bit of attention to last season and think that? I’d love to hear more about how Cooper and Mac are stud WRs that beat opposing DBs at will 4 different ways.

          • Kev_H

            That’s not close to what I wrote. Idea is players who are versatile, who don’t tip your hand by being on the field and who can beat you in every aspect. It seems promising and 160 pound guys really can’t do that.

          • Amar

            Exactly, my thoughts…

      • Adam

        I’m not sure if you’re joking or not.

        • Ark87

          It was a ludicrous example posed under the black and white axiom that this was about x’s and o’s, not a grey (and likely) mix of cap/roster management, locker room/personality issues, and whatever else.

      • B-West

        Why is admission on their part so critical? Have you not seen every single NFL interview for the past decade? Nobody answers questions honestly or gives detail. In the rare instances someone does answer honestly, they get roasted by the 24 hour media cycle and never dare give anything of substance again.

        Stick to the script, give bland, no substance answers, and move on. This is life in the NFL…

        Not to mention the legal ramifications if they admitted to releasing
        him over the allegations. I thought it was pretty clear they wanted to
        move on from Desean before all the gang-related nonsense, that
        information just muddied the waters.

        Anyway, you know the deal, I know the deal, everybody knows what happened here. It was a sum of all the things that have been bantered around that eventually tipped the scales and the Birds decided to move on. I don’t find it that important that the Eagles clarify their reasons, nor do I find it surprising that an NFL franchise would be vague about their decision making.

        • Ark87

          Your last paragraph is what I’m saying, they need to just shut up rather than say something idiotic that amounts to outsmarting themselves. Just continue saying, We felt at the time and continue to feel that it was right for the Eagles. The end. Keep it vague, why go endorsing and denying now. It’s Silly.

      • aub32

        I wouldn’t say we are all cool with it. his is still my team, but I hated that move

        • Ark87

          Apologies, there is a large contingent of people who hated the move I did not mean to speak for, but isn’t pretending that Jackson hurts the team from a football standpoint (and nothing else) even more insulting to the player than anything else. Are we reaaaallly going to pretend that Jackson was holding this offense back and simply had to go? He know’s we know that isn’t true right? Does he know that’s not true? hmmm.

          • aub32

            I agree with your other points completely. Saying nothing is better than insulting the intelligence of the fan base and belittling one of our home grown talents. I think Kelly, now more than ever, will be under the microscope for his words. He’s a media darling right now. He had tremendous success in his first year. He’s an intelligent and witty guy who the media can’t get enough of, and it’s evident that everyone wants to see what Chip Kelly’s Eagles can do. However, that can change very quickly if this offense is outside the top 5 and Jackson is putting up top 15 production in the Nation’s Capitol.

      • JofreyRice

        Right, and if you want to “get bigger”, then draft a bigger WR this year, and develop him to take over next. Trade talent for talent, not talent for nothing. People like to cite Tampa Bay and the Revis situation, first of all, that really was a scheme fit thing. You aren’t going to pay Darrelle Revis 16 million to hunker down in cover 2 zones and make 80 tackles, you’re paying him that to take the opponent’s best receiver out of the game. 2nd, they signed on the of the top CBs on the market to replace Revis. Talent for talent.

        • aub32

          Well we got Sproles (a backup gadget RB) and Mac (a hobbled WR that has played softer than many care to admit). Isn’t that the same thing?

          • JofreyRice

            Maclin has been a very poor open field runner, as a pro. I feel like his best strength is finding the soft spots in zone coverage. With the Eagles seeing so much man, we’ll have to see how he fares in those situations.

            I know a lot of people want to move on from this, but it’s tough for me, because Desean was a pretty unique talent. There were times when I thought he could have had even bigger games, were Foles to get him the ball, so I think it’s possible he would have had even better numbers this year, had he stuck around. Sheil showed the all-22 of him getting 2 or 3 steps on Keenan Lewis in the playoff game. When I was re-watching that Dallas game there was a play when Jackson motioned into the backfield, and then ran a little swing pattern where no one was around him for 20 yards. He was waving his arms up and down, but Foles never saw him.

            This isn’t intended to be criticism of Nick Foles, I think Kelly did a great job of defining reads for him, and to expect him to be able to freelance and have total mastery of the offense is a bit much, with less than a season’s experience, but hopefully Foles will eventually be able to spot those kind of situations real-time. Will the receivers he is left with be able to make the most out of them?

          • aub32

            I agree with everything you said. DeSean could have been up the with Megatron and Gordon as far as production in this offense. Think back to the Chragers game where Vick missed him on at least 3 deep attempts when Jackson got behind everyone, and he still put up monster numbers. Adding Maclin and Sproles, along with an improved Ertz would have taken some attention away from Jackson. So I don’t get how he doesn’t put up big numbers yet again. The move just doesn’t make since from a purely football perspective.

          • Adam

            If you watched much of Foles in at Arizona, he thrived when things broke down and he had to freelance. His OL line was terrible, and a good portion of his big plays came with him outside of the pocket.

          • JofreyRice

            Yeah, I didn’t watch him at Arizona, but I know he had a lot of success doing that last year, for the most part. First I really watched him was the Senior Bowl, where he looked horrendous.

            Maybe I used the wrong word in “freelance”. I don’t mean it in the sense of keeping a play alive and scrambling around, until someone breaks back toward the ball. I meant that I think Kelly made the reads clear for Foles, and created favorable matchups for those clearly defined reads to be open, so Foles could be extremely efficient.

            I don’t think Foles regularly dropped back and scanned through 4 or 5 receivers across the entire field in the process of a few seconds, and then went to the open guy. I think he was hand-held a bit, which, by the way, is good coaching. You want to hold the guy’s hand. But I think as he gains experience you can open things up and give him more options and autonomy on given plays.

          • aub32

            I think the majority of football people would agree with your point. Otherwise, I would expect to hear a lot more noise about the season Foles had. However, the Eagles success is mostly attributed to Kelly and how he managed Foles. In fact, there are still reports surfacing regularly that the Eagles may be in the market for a QB. I don’t think that will happen, nor do I want it to. I am hoping Foles can get to the point where he’s progressing through more of his reads and relying less on predetermined mismatches.

          • Adam

            I don’t think you have much basis when you say a majority of football people would agree with this opinion. If it’s all attributed to Kelly then Vick would have done the same, and Barkley too.

            There won’t be a point when Foles won’t be looking for predetermined mismatches because this entire offense is focused around creating pre-snap mismatches. That’s where the success comes from, and because Foles is a smart QB, he thrived. A guy like Vick didn’t have as much success because it’s never been a strong point in his game.

            Kelly deserves a lot of the credit because he creates offense that allows a QB to thrive if they’re able to make the correct reads. But that only gets you so far. At some point the QB needs to executed. And Foles did. So he deserves a good portion of the credit too.

          • Maggie

            Isn’t it strange that the NFL, with no personal interest in the Eagles, rated Maclin higher as a WR than Jackson, before Maclin’s injury. Now, who is the best option for the 4th or 6th round of the draft. Probably a Tackle or Guard, wouldn’t you think?

          • JofreyRice

            I’m sorry, I’m not familiar with what you’re talking about. Who is “The NFL”? You mean the draft?

      • Maggie

        Keep their mouths shut?? They did that, and 30 million people whined and whined and whined “WHY”? “You MUST explain!” At least it seemed like 30 million. Right here on 24/7 and other blogs. 350 million Americans and others couldn’t care less. A football deal was done, one of hundreds in the off season. OTA’s have started. Who looks good?

    • B-West

      Totally agree with the first paragraph. The article was the final nail in his trade value coffin, and the definitive answer to what I bet the Eagles’ brass had been asking themselves… “Really? We can’t get ANYTHING for Desean??”

      On the second paragraph… I know it’s semantics, but isn’t that football? Isn’t work ethic part of it? We know Chip wants perfection from his offense, doesn’t practice make perfect?

      • Richard Colton

        yeah. good point. although then you could extend the argument to its logical conclusion and say that any decision made by a football team regarding one of its players is a “football decision.” My thinking is that the decision was more about attitude and work ethic than it was about hand size and height.

    • Jamie

      I have to agree with the first half of your post. The team was going to move on without DeSean regardless.
      All the NJ.com story did was ruin whatever trade value DeSean had left.
      If they spent the week of the owners meeting shopping him, and got no takers, then what they did was best for all parties.

    • Eagles1018

      Here’s the main point IMO:

      “And unfortunately when you’re managing a team in the NFL and the amount of resources you get in terms of salary cap and the players who come up in terms of contracts, you’ve gotta make decisions and you’ve gotta figure out how you’re trying to build a team and where you’re gonna put resources. And our offseason is part of that.”

      That’s Howie’s not so subliminal way to say we felt like we have more important players to invest our money in. Which I honestly feel is a shame. As smart as Howie is (seems) you look at the player and what he’s accomplished compared to the league and compared to what you want to invest in the position. To be honest the more I piece things together the more I see Chip not trading back and taking a WR with the 22nd pick. He’s putting his guys in, which hey he’s the coach he’s asked to do a job so he has to be happy with the guys he wants getting that job done.

      I might be reaching (anyone feel free to chime in) but I blame Howie for this. Chip is sorta cleaning up his mess. I mean Howie is not an X’s and O’s GM he’s a finance guy. His research shoulda brought him to a more reasonable contract (give the player incentives to perform versus just front loading to dump at your discretion) because clearly some guys don’t like the contract structure. I wonder how many other teams draw contracts this way. I’m sure some but it can’t be everyone.

      In the end I guess time will tell if this is the right move. If we split with the redskins and go back to the playoffs if be content. And I just erased happy and typed content because I still want a ring and I think he coulda been a more integral piece to our puzzle

    • Philly0312

      Overall, if he played and practiced like Avant, he might have played better in big games against big competition. He never has, and that is why it is a football decision to me. When a guy is paid 12 mil a year at WR, he shouldn’t get shut down by good corners regularly.

      • aub32

        He can’t throw the ball to himself. Did you watch Foles against the saints? How can you say Jackson never showed in big games? Did he not have the winning play in the meadowlands? Did he not score the TD that could have taken us to the SB if the D would have just done their job afterward. The chargers game was a big game last year. He showed up. We could have locked up the division one game sooner if we had beaten MIN. He had 195 yards. Just because we haven’t had any post season success the last couple of years does not mean it’s all due to DeSean.

        • Philly0312

          Really? Come on, I am not in any way a hater of DJax, but a punt return is not WR play – it was a clutch play, and one of my favorite plays I have watched in my life, but he rarely returns punts anymore and you don’t pay a guy 12 million to return 10 punts and play WR. You pay him to play WR.

          He has had two solid playoff games his rookie year (170 yards and a TD in two games), and averaged 37.0 yards per game in 4 other playoff games.

          You want to cite the Saints game as Foles fault? Debatable. He was tentative, but Lewis lock him down all game (0 catches), and then get hurt, which allowed DJax to go against inferior competition and pull in 53 yards in the second half.

          My main point isn’t just big games: He shouldn’t get paid 12 mil a year at WR if he is going to get shut down by good corners regularly. San Diego and the Vikings were two of the worst pass defenses in the NFL last year. Against Oakland he was wide open for his two big plays due to the huge defensive mistakes.

          Against good corners and defenses last year and big games:

          KC: 62 yards
          Denver: 34 yards
          Tampa: 64 yards and 2 tds (but Tampa was pointlessly playing zone)
          Arizona: 36 yards

          Chicago and Dallas Week 16/17: Combined 57 yards

          Feel free to go back into the rest of his career and find the same pattern against good corners. Oh, he has a game here or there, but he is in no way a guy deserving of 12 million a year, which is one of many reasons he was cut. I didn’t include the GB game because that one is a toss up – Foles deep ball to him was horrible and should have been picked off – and instead was a ridiculous TD. Outside of that he was locked down by Shields, but you could go either way on that one. I’d rather they take the 12 million to secure Cox, Kendricks, Boykin for the long run and draft a younger WR. Feel free to disagree, but DJax has been underwhelming as a #1. I think he will be a great fit with the skins, given Garcon is a much better WR than DJax, and DJax will see weaker corners more regularly.

    • Amar

      I just cannot buy the argument that he was not a scheme fit…does not make sense. I’m all ears if you tell me he had gang ties, was insubordinate, etc. but not about X’s and O’s. He is a unique talent and a stellar playmaker. We don’t have the trophy cases like the rest of the NFC East, what we do have are moments like Desean returning the punt into the Giants’ endzone as time expired, like every TD splash that he did falling into the endzone, when there wasn’t a DB in 15 yards of him.
      They better have a strategy in place here, or you are gonna hear from the fans.

  • JosephR2225

    I think what was said yesterday in general has to be taken with a very large grain of salt. “Football reasons” and “going in a different direction” gives us maybe one page of the story, but I doubt we’ll ever hear anything more than that.

    • Maggie

      Oh I sincerely hope that we do not hear one more word about it.

  • mtn_green

    At the least eagles could have released a statement at the time of the release stating ‘football decision.’ They’ve read the articles heard the speculation and could have said something instead of waiting until the next time media has access to them.
    In the end it doesn’t matter, eagles didn’t create the speculation, the speculation didn’t end up hurting DeSean, he gets less money but went from 0 guaranteed to 16 million guaranteed. It’s not eagles job to correct the media.

    • ceedubya9

      Strange thing to me is that Avant was released with plenty of nice words on the way out. DeSean….nothing. A guy released for “football reasons,” that has been a major part of your franchise for the past few years seems like he would have gotten a bit better of a send-off, I would think. Instead, there was a canned announcement, silence for a month, and rumors continued that put the player in a bad light. Strange.

      • dnabrice

        One word….personality…

    • Kev_H

      What do you think they do in their business. At the owner’s meeting Kelly said all good things about Jackson, same as yesterday, in the midst of media hoopla that Jackson was a trouble maker and that they didn’t get along. Monthly reiterations are more than enough for guys prepping for the draft and getting ready for next year.

  • Brandon Boykin, LOL

    I’ve said this many times, and I’ll continue to say it:

    For whatever reason Chip didn’t like DeSean Jackson. Simple.

  • Brian

    Whatever.

  • pjcostello

    People forget that the Eagles tried to trade Jackson LAST offseason, just after Kelly arrived. I think he kept him for the same reason he kept Vick: Continuity… to not alienate the locker room 10 minutes after you arrive.

  • Kev_H

    This column makes no sense at all. The NJ.com article is what it is and has nothing to do with the Eagles and there is nothing the Eagles could do that wouldn’t have the press speculating. Kelly’s explanation makes perfect sense in football world- decide to go in a different direction at the end of the season, try to work a deal up to and through the owner’s meeting, come home and assess whether a trade is forthcoming (it is clear that there were no deals to be had at this point), and if not, make the move. It doesn’t make sense for them to make the move during the meetings, and if the would have cut Jackson after the article came out, the media would still be spinning the same nonsense.

    Two more very salient points: 1. there isn’t anything that came out on NJ.com that wasn’t already all over TMZ and if you don’t think TMZ is relevant, I suggest you talk to Donald Sterling.

    2. The Eagles’ management had ZERO strategic incentive to say or imply anything bad about Jackson, and their actions and words have been consistent with that. I’m willing to bet Kelly will never rip a player in his coaching career and I’m certain he doesn’t care if fans or fan/bloggers understand or support his personnel maneuvers. Why would he need “cover” for a personnel move? I don’t think they care that he went to the Redskins, but it helps the Eagles’ competitive position in personnel world if Jackson takes up more of the Redskin’s allotted salary cap space. On the other hand, any of the teams that might have been interested in Jackson had a great deal of incentive to spread rumors about him. It could scare off competitors and drive down his price.

    • JofreyRice

      As a business, the customer’s perception affects the bottom line, on some level. Kelly may not care about the popularity of his moves, but someone in that enterprise does. There’s no way the timing was coincidental, it was absolutely orchestrated. I think Sheil summed up the reasoning for it pretty well in a sentence or two, so I won’t bother re-typing it. Cover for what could be a wildly unpopular move.

      • Adam

        This move will affect the bottom line about as much as me farting will affect global warming.

        • JofreyRice

          so you think it was purely coincidental that he was released 40 mins after the story broke?

          He made a lot of highlight plays. His name is on the back of a lot of jerseys in the Delaware Valley. He was on the intro to Sunday night football. He was mentioned in a movie pretty prominently. If I allow what a lot of people are saying–that he was basically just a track star that can be replaced easily in aweek–they still released a guy with a lot of star power for basically no reason. Businesses think about that kind of stuff.

          • Adam

            No, but thinking that this is going to affect the bottom line is silly if you understand the business model of the NFL. Considering a bulk of their revenue is from TV deals, well, unless people plan to boycott the major networks, it’s just not going to hurt. The main areas that would be affected by a move like this, ticket sales and perhaps jersey sales, make up such a small portion of an NFL’s team revenue, it’s just not going to make that a big of a difference.

            There will be a lot of people pissed off about this without a doubt. But after last seasons success, do you honestly expect a large enough portion of Eagles fan base to simply stop watching this team because of this one move? I don’t see it happening at all. I doubt they’ll skip a beat.

          • JofreyRice

            So you agree they probably coordinated the move with the story. Why, then, if not to save face for a move that could be wildly unpopular with some fans?

            I haven’t really studied the way the NFL does revenue sharing and what percentages of profits come from where–not that interesting to me, and hard to find any real data–but to coordinate the release seems to indicate they had some incentive to soften the blow.

            You could be right, that it may not affect their bottom line much, but I can’t agree that any effect would be totally negligible, or that they organization would be completely cavalier about how the fans would react.

          • Adam

            The correlation between the release of the story and DJaxs release was that it eliminated what little remaining trade value he had left, so it was time to go.

          • JofreyRice

            Yeah, I think management/ownership groups of successful enterprises think about how things are perceived by fans, and sometimes make decisions with those perceptions in mind. I think that’s part of the reason they brought the hammer down so viciously on this Sterling creep.

          • Kev_H

            Huh? First, the Eagles have long established that they make the football moves they want without any deference to fan sentiment (see Vick, McNabb, Dawkins, Trotter).

            Second, the NJ.com story didn’t contain any new information. Speaking of the Sterling creep, he was brought down by TMZ, the same outlet that was running derogatory stories about Jackson for months prior to NJ.com and they still are– I think they just follow him around and the stories write themselves. He got shot down by Rihanna the other weekend. Anyone with an internet who was curious about Jackson knew about his friends in gangs.

            Third, as I stress on the initial post here, what incentive do the Eagles have to undermine any player or former player? That doesn’t benefit them in any way. Teams pursuing Jackson had incentive to devalue Jackson and some suggest that Jackson and his agent had incentive to see him released. Reality is more benign, however. It is far, far more likely that given weeks of trade rumors, some columnist/bloggers with time on their hands (probably after reading TMZ) thought they’d look closer at Jackson’s background, found some public information, interviewed a detective and wrote a story to provide the 10,000th angle in a beaten-to-death story, since they probably got bored of writing the same column every day. Remember, none of it was new, but it got thrown in yours and my faces because NJ.com was eager to promote their site and get some clicks and ESPN was looking for a reason to do what they do, rather than just describe it for what it was. I don’t see any way, rhyme or reason for the Eagles to spend 30 seconds on considering how they’d report the release of Jackson. They have an established protocol that was followed.

          • JofreyRice

            The only incentive they have, which I’ve mentioned, is to soften the blow for what could be an extremely unpopular move. They care more about the overall image of the organization than they do about Jackson, which is not surprising for a billion dollar business.

            Once they exhausted all options in trying to trade him, they had NJ.com release the story. They have absolutely smeared players on their way out the door before. You don’t remember the stories about Trotter’s “bone-on-bone” knees leaking out?

          • Maggie

            Jackson has moved on. Please try to do the same.

          • JofreyRice

            Maggie, why don’t you try to post about things that are interesting to you, rather than haunt this blog. complaining about what other people are posting about?

        • Richard Colton

          lay off the maple syrup

          • Maggie

            Hey now! That could seriously affect the economy of Vermont!

      • Kev_H

        Annnnd what was the cover when they dumped their best QB ever coming off of a Pro Bowl, high scoring season? It’s a team sport and everyone is someone’s favorite player. This concept you write of seems new in sports. SK’s ‘logic’ seems bizarre.

        • JofreyRice

          McNabb had a much, much different relationship with the fans. How many times has Jackson been booed, as an Eagle, at the Linc? I’m thinking 0. What number was that for McNabb? Right or wrong, the fans were always hard on McNabb, and some contingent felt that he was responsible for the Super Bowl choke. And they had a 2nd round QB that Andy had handpicked waiting in the wings. They have Jeff Maehl waiting in the wings, and whomever they add in the draft.

          McNabb is apples to oranges with Jackson, just as comparing Jackson to Dawkins would be. And please don’t tell me there was no fan response to them letting Dawkins walk away. The difference in those cases was that whether you agreed or not, Father Time had some affect on Dawkins and McNabb–you could rationalize the decision. From a “football” standpoint, releasing a 27 year old pro bowler that led the team in yards, touchdowns, first downs, and 20+ yard plays is indefensible; the only viable argument is about cost/value added.

    • Maggie

      Realistic analysis. Now, please let’s everybody comment on another topic. eg: will Herremans need to be retired this year or next? Been a good player for this team, but time catches up with everybody. Which OL could the Eagles draft in the 5th or 6th round?

  • Tom W

    Fine w everything roseman and chip and lurid said. And to the article itself, eagles tried to trade djax for over a year including well before this years owners meetings. They didn’t just start trying to trade him at the owners meeting. There were numerous reports of contact w several teams weeks before the owners meeting and most likely contact we also don’t know about. And it was reported eagles planned to move on from Jackson a month before the owners meeting.

  • Adam

    It’s pretty funny that for a month people complained about not getting a reason, but now they’re whining it isn’t good enough.

    • Chris

      Agreed. I mean, what kind of answer did people expect? They’re not going to throw him under the bus, and odds are, if you aren’t happy that he got the ax in the first place, you won’t be happy with any reason the FO gives you anyway.

      • Adam

        “Here is our exact reasoning behind any and all personnel decisions. Please don’t tell the other teams.”

        • Richard Colton

          OK sure. The Belichick way is how a lot of front offices operate. Don’t tell the media anything. But come on, its only football. How cool would it be (for once) to get a Larry Brown-ish answer from one of these guys?

          Les Bowen: So why did you cut DeSean?
          Chip: Because he’s an A$$hole, and I’m tired of dealing with A$$holes.

          • Javi Echie

            An answer like that would be epic

          • Maggie

            Agree, except for one small point. To us it’s only football. To the people in it, it’s a multi-billion dollar business, with a large number of employees who don’t particularly want to lose their jobs too soon. But I do like your fantasy coach’s answer.

  • Robert Perri

    Anyone else tired of trying to dissect this to death? DeSean is gone, lets move on… The same people who were screaming for them to explain are now jumping all over them for speaking when asked.

    • Maggie

      YES, PLEEEEASE!!

  • tbwhite

    The timing of DeSean’s cut was no coincidence, as others have pointed out. Given his contract and the trade rumors, the article being published destroyed whatever little trade value was left.

    The fact that DeSean and his agent were able to parlay his free agency into a new payday for them both makes me suspect they were driving the bus that hit DeSean’s reputation. The last thing DeSean’s agent wanted was for him to be traded, it’s unlikely the new team would have renegotiated his contract, and what if DeSean’s number tumbled in a different system ? DeSean and his agent wanted him to be a free agent and I believe actively worked to make that happen. Why else would those old non-stories about his gang ties suddenly surface ?

    • Kev_H

      If the NJ.com article contained any new or not previously known information, that would make sense. But it didn’t. It was all public information that I am certain every NFL team who had any interest in acquiring Jackson was either aware of or, like Kelly apparently, didn’t care about.

  • ochospantalones

    Chip needs to explain why he damaged the team last year by allowing DeSean to play. We could have gone on a deep playoff run without DeSean holding us back. Chip has a lot to answer for.

    • Kev_H

      Maclin and Benn got hurt in training camp and Kelly had to make do with what was left. All-in-all, I think he did ok. It is reported that they tried to trade Jackson prior to last season too. What happened, happened, but I bet Jackson wouldn’t have played so much if Maclin and Benn had been available.

  • borntosuffer

    Yawn. Isn’t this pretty much like anything in life where you weren’t actually “in the room”? Even an explanation that everyone believes could be completely false. Conversely, an explanation no one believes could be true. Maybe we get more clues as more people release “information”. Who will vet those anonymous comments? Let’s just agree that everyone will form their own idea of what has happened and move on. At this point, I don’t really know. But, more importantly, I don’t really care either.

  • Brandon Baltic

    “Then again, if the decision to get rid of Jackson was made right after the season ended, why not try to work out a trade before the free agency period when teams had more money to spend?”

    Hit the nail right on the head, Sheil. I wish a reporter would have asked Chip and Lurie this exact question. And also if it was clear a trade couldn’t have been worked out before FA (since it was apparently not surprising to them that one couldn’t have been worked out during the owners meetings), then why not cut him before FA so the Eagles could use DeSean’s cap savings to sign other pieces at the beginning of FA?

    The timing of the move just screams amateur hour to me. Not sure to chalk it up to Chip’s inexperience in the NFL or maybe they were waffling on the decision at the owners meetings, but the execution of their plan to move DeSean was just horrid, if it was in fact a purely football move.

    • Kev_H

      I think the Eagles were able to get who they wanted in free agency. I don’t think they were restricted by salary or money. Who do you think they would have picked up and why would Jackson’s status made a difference?

      • Brandon Baltic

        You are right. I just realized they can roll Desean’s savings into next year so my initial point is moot now.

  • travis papa

    It’s really simple and it will all be solved next wk. If we draft brandin cooks or someone like him obviously Kelly didn’t like djax and wanted the same skill set just different person. If we draft Evans Benjamin or anyone their size roughly it’s a size thing. All the info out there is leading me to believe it’s a size thing and we try to make a move for Evans or trade back and take Benjamin. If neither make it close enough we switch gears and pull the trigger on a trade for Jordan.

    • Kev_H

      Generally, that is true, and I expect them to pick bigger receivers, but I don’t think Cooks and Jackson are the same skill set. Cooks is 20 pounds heavier than Jackson and (in college at least) seems to run with more authority and elusiveness in small spaces. I can see Cooks succeeding inside the numbers closer to the LOS where Jackson really hasn’t.

      • travis papa

        I agree with you and could see cooks being a better pro than djax. I was just speaking I guess in generalities of size (height) and speed.

  • JofreyRice

    lying through his teeth. That’s fine. The bar is set. The offense should be at least as good, or better next year. Yards, touchdowns, first downs. Someone is going to need to step into that void.

    • Adam

      You expected the truth?

      • aub32

        I expected them to continue to say nothing rather than insult our intelligence

        • Adam

          Ahh, gotcha. Lemme see if I got this straight then. Eagles owe us an explanation, unless the explanation doesn’t fit my narrative of the situation, in which case they should continue to say nothing, so I can continue to complain about them being silent on the issue?

          • aub32

            I was done complaining about the silence. I hate the move, but I had very little to say about the silence. The move doesn’t make sense from a football standpoint. So I never really expected them to say why they made the move as no good could come from it. Either they would have to bash Jackson, look cheap, or appear arrogant (We can make anyone a star).

          • JofreyRice

            I don’t think I’ve been complaining about them being silent. I haven’t seen aub, either. I think we’ve both been pretty critical of the move itself, but realistically, I don’t think either of us were expecting much of an explanation or “whining” or “crying” about them not providing one. To be fair, it’s a hell of a task to explain it, without being blunt, and saying he was making too much money. From a “football” standpoint, it’s pretty much indefensible, if they don’t replace his production and move on from him, without a beat.

            Should we just support the organization no matter what, never questioning the reasoning behind specific moves? Would be a bit of a boring blog, everyone sitting around and singing hosannas to the Novakremlin.

          • aub32

            Nice

          • Adam

            No one is saying blind support. My point is and has been for the entire duration of this argument that is if, when you release a player, expecting any more than cookie cutter answer from an organization is just going not going to happen. No team is going to give you the truth. As many people who are going to be pissed about this cookie cutter answer were going to be pissed about no answer at all. Damned if you do you and damned if you don’t.

          • JofreyRice

            I don’t disagree with that. Ultimately, the wisdom of this move will be proven on the field, which was my point, above.

          • 76mustang

            From a “football” standpoint, the team goal is to win the Super Bowl. Tell me how a player that willfully skips his end of season interview with the coaches, answers a reporter’s question about his contract that he deserves more money, and says that he and his new agent have a good off-season plan represent a football player focused on the team goal?

            Also, DeSean was an injury replacement Pro Bowler this past season. And if the Eagles really are being honest when they say they want to be fair to players and give them an opportunity to latch on somewhere else, how is that a bad thing??

          • JofreyRice

            Do you honestly believe the offense will be better without Jackson? If the goal is to win a Super Bowl, you need players that make big plays. You don’t throw them away for nothing to save a few dollars.

          • 76mustang

            Yes, I believe Chip Kelly is a better coach and football CEO than DeSean Jaccson is a player by a factor of 10+.

            Name the outside receiver at Oregon that could stretch the field and command safety help over the top…you can’t, because there wasn’t one. Yet, Chip somehow managed to consistently have a top 5 offense every season.

            There isn’t a person on this blog that could produce an NFL level offensive scheme and playbook, let alone navigate the waters of a head coach position; and yet we act like moving on from a player like DeSean is too daunting for Chip to handle. LeSean calls Chip an offensive genius. I think Chip will be able to move on from DeSean and take his offense to another level this season.

          • JofreyRice

            I like what Chip does as a coach, and agree he’s got a great mind for the offensive side of the ball, but I stop way short of deifying him as a genius head coach who has a scheme that can transcend talent after 10 wins in one of the worst divisions in football and a first round playoff loss. He never had a wide receiver as good as Desean at Oregon. Nor has he had a runner as talented as McCoy. I don’t see the correlation; we’re talking about the pros here.

            As I’ve said, we’ll see what plays out on the field.

          • 76mustang

            The correlation to college is my exact point – for the first time in Chip’s coaching career, he’s competing on a level playing field. No bullshit polls, no unbalanced scheduling, no bag man recruiting, no NCAA hipocrisy to deal with – just football.

            You comment on talent makes no sense DeSean and LeSean had career years under Chip’s tutelage in the pros – I think Chip understands the value of talent better than most.

            If DeSean is so special, then we can expect to see the DC Skins in the Super Bowl soon.

        • Jerry Pomroy

          I think that was more so under the Banner & Reid era. Then they made a move/non-move and basically said go scratch. I think they’ve turned that corner to being a more open franchise. This is a sticky situation and they are actually taking the high road rather than leading a political smear campaign.

      • JofreyRice

        Not really, I think I’d have preferred he just said less than to insult our intelligence by saying it was a football move.

        I think Roseman got closer to the truth in his discussion of “cap allocation” or whatever. Money–too much to one guy that they feel is reasonably replaceable.

        • Jerry Pomroy

          You could argue that money being a reason could be a football reason. We didn’t like the player at the money so we just decided to move on. Football is a business, so contracts and money are football no matter how you try to slice it.

          • JofreyRice

            yeah, you could argue that, but I think it’s a tough position. There in fantastic shape, cap-wise. This wasn’t a situation like NO or Dallas, where they were throwing guys overboard to field a 53 man roster. And they didn’t clear space to replace talent with talent, as in the case of Tampa Bay. They just didn’t want to pay him what his contract demanded.

            As we saw, even though he got the biggest deal for a FA on the market, it was still less than what he would have made here. So I guess their desire not to “overpay” him outweighed whatever benefit they thought he’d bring to the offense. I don’t agree. Like I said, if they wanted to move on, then move on, but don’t get rid of Jackson before you have another talent in place.

            I think when you get into all the cap/value stuff you lose the forest for the trees. The point is to use the cap to field a football team that can score points and stop the other team from doing the same. For me, it’s not a question, Jackson helped score points.

          • Jerry Pomroy

            I’m not making a case for or against. In just saying that “football reasons” in this day and age definitely do not start and end with what’s done on the field on Sundays.

            But you’re making my point that I posted above that this situation brings out the emotional side of people on both sides even though they were previously able to come to accept it. Might not agree with it but have accepted it. Now that it’s been brought back to light it reinstates people’s emotional responses.

            Don’t get me wrong Jof, I’m not contesting you. But rather using you as an example for my psychological blabber…lol.

          • JofreyRice

            oh I don’t think I’m too emotional. I do feel strongly that it was a bad move, and will engage in discussion to explain my point of view, but I don’t get vicious or personal on here.

            Maybe Kelly is an mastermind on par with Sid Gillman, Don Coryell, Lombardi, Walsh, and Belichick. I don’t know. I do know that Jackson affected defensive game plans and made me jump out of my seat a bunch of times. Tough to see a guy like that go for nothing.

          • Jerry Pomroy

            No I know you don’t get personal. I mean that you were a guy that felt strongly about it when it went down, then made some peace with it. But now this then reengages that anger towards the move.

          • Jerry Pomroy

            Just me taking an outside look at the situation and how people are reacting.

          • JofreyRice

            I hear you. I mean, I’ve made my peace with it, for the moment, but I’m definitely keeping score. This was a big, bold move for a young head coach. This is Kelly making his mark.

      • Maggie

        I keep expecting the media, including the writers on this blog, to write about SOMETHING ELSE!!!

        • JofreyRice

          I think you’re misguided. Releasing a very good player in his prime for ostensibly no reason is an actual story. Moreover, there are no other “real” stories at the moment, except for the long, slow crawl to the draft.

          • Jerry Pomroy

            low crawl with your face in the dirt slow.

            Hahaha memories… In BT my platoon completed the live round night infiltration in the quickest time. Bloodied elbows, knees and forearms, we were soooo amped up on adrenaline we begged to go again.

            …Colt will understand

          • JofreyRice

            that’s cool man, thanks for your service!

          • Richard Colton

            Yeah brother, night infiltration at Benning. thats live ammo being fired over your head, and for the record – no, I didn’t want to go again.

          • OldDocRoss

            Completely agree with regards this being a real story, but equally I think what we’ve heard from the Eagles is all we’re going to hear and all we should hear.

            Kelly has said he would “do what’s right for the team” on multiple occasions. His recent statements re DeSean not being a great fit are, to me, at odds with previous comments where he said he’d fit the scheme around the players (for reference see every amswer ever given about mobile QBs).

            Whatever the actual reasons it would be pointless to give these to the public so it’s up to us to fill in the blanks. If people believe it was all Kelly’s ego, more power to em. If they say it was all down to DeSean being a T.O.-esque cancer that’s their right. Personally I think it was a bunch of little things that would be of no consequence in isolation (or even in conjunction to many teams), but which ultimately meant Kelly felt he wasn’t worth the money. And of course its worth noting zero out of 31 teams felt it was even worth a 7th to get DeSean on the contract we had him on.

  • Maggie

    Why, in the name of heaven, are you STILL talking about one of the players released by the Eagles in the off-season??? It does not matter who, when , where, why etc. The guy is GONE! Where are the 300 pieces about Avant? Hmm? Universally liked, respected, hard worker, team leader, yet was released. Get OVER it, please!

  • IAteLunchToday

    So I’ve been done with the Jackson story for a while now, but something I was curious about was when Kelly spoke to Jackson and he thought he was going to remain on the team. Did Kelly straight up lie to him or was Jackson just unable to read between the lines? Was that ever revealed?

    • anon

      Kely basically sad don’t worry keep doing your thing, working out, etc. everything will work out in the end.

      • IAteLunchToday

        Thanks.

  • UKEagle99

    After 30 days I thought they would come up with something better, like…

    “You want the truth? You can’t handle the truth! Son, we live in a world that has walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with footballs. Who’s gonna do it? You? I have greater responsibility than you could possibly fathom. You weep for Jackson and you curse the front office. You have that luxury. You have the luxury of not knowing what I know. That Jackson’s release, while tragic, probably saved millions. And my existence, while grotesque and incomprehensible to you, scores points. You don’t want the truth because deep down in places you don’t talk about at parties, you want me on that wall, you need me on that wall. We use words like honor, code, loyalty. We use these words as the backbone of a life spent building something. You use them as a punchline. I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very football team that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. I would rather you just said thank you, and went on your way, Otherwise, I suggest you pick up a football and run a post pattern. Either way, I don’t give a damn what you think you are entitled to.”

    • IAteLunchToday

      I would almost substitute sideline for wall, But funny either way.

      • UKEagle99

        Done! Good call :)

      • UKEagle99

        Done! Good call :)

        • UKEagle99

          Double post as my post disappeared, making me doubt myself!

    • Jerry Pomroy

      Brilliant! Makes we wanna watch the movie just for that scene.

      • UKEagle99

        Yeah, Joffery’s truth post struck a chord and IAteLunchToday gave it the final touch. I could just imagine Chip saying that.

        Like you I’m done with the whole DJ saga. We survived Jerome’s passing (god bless), Reggie’s move to Gree (the other team)…

        As for DJ, I screamed at the TV as I saw the replay of him dropping the ball short of the goal line “Nooooooo”. I held my head in my hands as he dropped the punt vs the Gnats and my jaw dropped as he picked it up and juked his way through. He WAS a great Eagle and all great Eagles go to die in Washington :D Great player, good times, Redskin, move on,

  • Leegles

    As far as I’m concerned, the top comment under this article closed the D-Jax story: http://www.phillymag.com/birds247/2014/04/28/chip-desean-release-football-decision/#

    Please, please, please let’s move the eff on.

  • Birds4Life

    I found some things in this article interesting.

    http://bobwhalon.hubpages.com/hub/The-Philadelphia-Eagles-Wont-Miss-DeSean-Jackson

    The part about Desean having twenty 100 yard games in his career and half of them have come in the month of September. Playoffs are not played in September. Let’s be honest with ourselves for a second, Desean would feast on the lesser teams and not show up against good defenses. When looking at his stats as a whole, its WOW how can they replace 82/1300/9, but when were most of those stats put up?
    He was targeted less with Foles as QB. And with Maclin back and Sproles and a new rookie WR, Desean was going to be targeted even less than that. Do you think that Desean would be all smiles on the sidelines if he isn’t getting his stats?

  • Jerry Pomroy

    I’m so done with this. Tim/Sheil, I know you guys are doing your jobs but can we move on gracefully from this? I can see throwing up a quick story like yesterday, but dragging the situation on adds fuel to what can become a big fire. Especially in the comments where those that are disgruntled but moved on then become angry again and abusive to those that don’t see it the same as they do. Or you get the opposite and have those that want to rub DeSean’s name and those that support him through the dirt at all costs. Just makes for a mess.

    Can we get a stack ranking on the best fits at OLB for the Eagles?

  • Explorer51

    I guess this will never stop…

  • Maggie

    One final thing. From philly.com:
    Of the 18 players who had more receptions than Jackson last season, only two – Andre and Calvin Johnson – had bigger 2014 cap numbers than DeSean. Of the 13 players who had more touchdown catches, only two – the Johnsons again – had a bigger cap number.
    Jackson’s cap number would have been higher than that of 20 of the league’s 32 starting quarterbacks. It would have been $3 million more than that of teammate LeSean McCoy, who led the league in rushing last season.
    After watching him fail to gain more than 60 receiving yards in 5 of his last 6 games last season, and after watching Saints corner Keenan Lewis manhandle Jackson in the playoffs, the Eagles weren’t interested in giving him another pile of money.
    No matter how fast and explosive Jackson is, no matter how many 20-plus-yard catches he had last year, the fact of the matter is that it’s hard to justify having a 5-9 1/2, 175-pound receiver who got his lunch eaten in the playoffs taking up nearly $13 million of your cap space.
    Comparing to …
    …Bucs releasing cornerback Darrelle Revis, the Bears releasing defensive end Julius Peppers and the Cowboys releasing DeMarcus Ware. Revis, Peppers and Ware have a combined total of 20 Pro Bowl appearances….

    • anon

      Why cut him? What else are you spending $$ on this year? Why not keep him for another year — we aren’t cap strapped this year.

      But agree he was overpaid — but that was the market when he got his deal. That’s what all of Howie’s contracts are like when the guaranteed money is over.

      • Kev_H

        They’re not running a welfare program and need the spot for another player. Why keep him if they don’t plan on playing him?

        • ochospantalones

          Yeah, you definitely should cut a pro bowl receiver to clear a roster spot for Ifeanyi Momah. Smart take.

    • ochospantalones

      Julius Peppers is 34 years old. He had 7 sacks last year. He did not make the Pro Bowl. The Bears used the savings from dumping his $14 million contact to sign Lamarr Houston to replace him. This is in no way similar to what the Eagles did with DeSean Jackson.

      DeMarcus Ware is 31 years old. He had a series of injuries the last two years. He had 6 sacks last year. He did not make the Pro Bowl last year. The Cowboys were over the cap and could not keep him at his 2014 cap figure. The Eagles were not over the cap. The situations are in no way similar.

      The only one that is somewhat similar is Darelle Revis. He is one year older than DeSean Jackson and did make the Pro Bowl last year. The Bucs were not over the cap. Unlike DeSean, Revis is still recovering from a serious knee injury. Revis was also playing for a team which hired a new coach who has a defensive system (Cover 2) which does not fit Revis’ skills or playing style (man coverage). You could say DeSean does not fit Kelly’s scheme, except somehow he had the best year of his career playing in that scheme and was the Eagles’ second best play-maker. The Bucs used the savings from cutting Revis to sign Alterraun Verner. They also signed a high-priced defensive end in Michael Johnson. The Eagles used the savings from cutting DeSean Jackson to replace him with… no one.