Urgent Staging Assistance Needed

Is it not possible to simply go in and just stuff a bunch of the items pictured into a garbage bag? I mean, there are homes being offered for less than $14,000 that have dignified photos, even foreclosures.

The listings copy reads:

Investor special on North Philly row home! This property is NOT a shell but does need some cleanout & cosmetics. Great opportunity for a long term buy & hold. Property is being sold as is.



Perfect Starter Home for Taney Dragon Starters

2419-naudain-opener

There are a number of homes for sale in the vicinity of Markward Playground, aka, THE PLACE WHERE THE TANEY LITTLE LEAGUE TEAM WAS BORN, but for families with children (or soon to have children), the inventory right now is somewhat limited. Enter this recently renovated three-bedroom, which is basically perfect for an adult/child combo. Here’s why:

1. Garage parking
2. Neighborhood public school: Greenfield. Neighborhood private school: The Philadelphia School.
3. Right near Fitler Square and Schuylkill River Park
4. Close to Children’s Hospital, in case someone puts a penny up his nose
5. SEPTA bus runs nearby
6. Two bathrooms
7. Street is small so there’s not much traffic

Other perks that have nothing to do with children include a wood burning fireplace, large private deck, hardwood floors, back patio, and central air. And: IT’S RIGHT NEAR THE HOME OF THE SOON-TO-BE LITTLE LEAGUE CHAMPIONS OF THE WORLD!!!!

Check out the gallery below.

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Futuristic Dilworth Plaza Renderings to Become Real Very Soon

dilworth park fountain

A detail of life as we will soon know it.

For a Philadelphia space that was established by William Penn as the center of the city, Dilworth Plaza’s new incarnation — at least as seen in renderings — has always seemed rather futuristic. And in advance of today’s press conference (more about that here), the Center City District, which has a 30-year lease on the space, heralded the project’s more forward-leaning aspects, such as the “11,600-square-foot computer-programmable fountain fed with recycled rainwater.”

But it’s all happening (as Penny Lane would say), and it’s happening now. Lest you think the rainwater business is the equivalent of realtor-speak (“rainforest shower” for a completely normal bathroom), this emphasis on sustainability is important to all involved. Nutter has said, from the beginning of his mayoralty, that he was going to focus on making Philly a green city; and the project’s design and construction firms — KieranTimberlake, OLIN, Urban Engineers, Gilbane Building Company and Daniel J. Keating Company — all have experience and commitment to sustainable design and/or building.

That’s partly the reason the name is changing: from Dilworth Plaza to Dilworth Park, to emphasize things like its tree groves and flower beds, and perhaps to encourage residents to see it as green space. (Some of the greenest elements of it won’t be done until October, though, including, according to CCD, the lawns and walkways to South Penn Square.)

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10 Cool Instagram Shots of PNB Letters Coming Down

The letters on the flatbed truck, destined for the scrapyard. Photo: Bradley Maule.

The letters on the flatbed truck, destined for the scrapyard. Photo: Bradley Maule.

One South Broad Street, a Beaux Arts building commissioned by the Wanamaker family that opened in 1932, underwent a quarter of a transformation this weekend when three of its iconic, 16-foot-high PNB letters — installed more than a half-century ago — were removed on Sunday.

The change was due to new ownership of the John T. Windrim-designed building: Aion Partners bought the building for $68 million in April, but as Hidden City reports, the removal of the letters has been a long time coming: “Removal of the letters was first approved by the Philadelphia Historical Commission in 2005, when Wachovia wanted to replace the PNB with branding of its own. (The Founder’s Bell and its belfry are on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places, while the building itself is not.)”

Below, some Instagrammer shots (including my own) of the letter removal, which will continue next week, perhaps, though the precise date hasn’t been nailed down. The letters, by the way, are headed to the scrapyard. Shame Vanna White isn’t in town.

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Post Bros.’ Goldtex Building Gets a “Neighborhood Tavern”

Photo: Liz Spikol

Photo: Liz Spikol

According to Zagat as reported in Foobooz, the Goldtex apartment building’s ground floor will soon be getting a restaurant. Mike Welsh, formerly of Franklin Mortgage and Lemon Hill, will open Brick & Mortar — “a neighborhood American tavern” — sometime in November in what’s currently 3,500 square feet of raw space.

One issue with Goldtex has been its location–what people call, variously, the Loft District, Eraserhood, or Chinatown-ish–Philadephians have a hard time seeing that area as warm and neighborhoody. But it sounds, from Welsh’s talk with Danya Henninger for Zagat, that the restaurant/bar’s vibe hopes to change that:

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McIlhenney Mansion’s Dome to Be Demolished

Photo by Brad Maule via Hidden City.

Photo by Brad Maule via Hidden City Daily.

An item in today’s Center City Residents Association email newsletter says demolition will start soon on the double-parcel McIlhenny Mansion at the southwest corner of Rittenhouse Square, now owned by developer Bart Blatstein. And there will be some changes:

When the dust has settled, the one story curved brick façade and dome at 1916 erected in 1957 will be gone. The planned replacement is a four story 47 foot high addition. The addition’s roofline will match that of the mansion’s other property, 1914 Rittenhouse Square, erected in 1859 with three stories capped by a one story mansard roof with dormer windows. The façade of 1914 is to remain unchanged. The mansion’s back entrance on Manning Street currently consists of a single story structure, a garage with a double width door adjacent to a servant’s entrance. The plans call for a two story structure on the western end with bedrooms atop two oversize garage entrances. On the eastern side, the addition will rise a third story above Manning Street.

Below, the plans included in CCRA’s email.

Plans via Center City Residents Association

Plans via Center City Residents Association

Huzzah! Pier 53 Is Officially Washington Avenue Pier

Photo by Douglas Bovitt courtesy Delaware River Waterfront Corp.

Photo by Douglas Bovitt courtesy Delaware River Waterfront Corp.

Today was the formal opening of the Washington Avenue Pier, which you may remember — from yesterday — as Pier 53. Part of the Master Plan for the Central Delaware, the Pier Formerly Known As 53 is now a very lovely and educational park, with pretty incredible views, from the Benjamin Franklin Bridge to the Walt Whitman Bridge, and from Philadelphia to New Jersey. And, of course, the mighty Delaware River.

The photos below show the variety of seating, educational components, boardwalk, and natural habitats designed and built by Applied Ecological Services and Neshaminy Contractors. You’ll also see photos of “Land Buoy” by artist Jody Pinto (best known round these parts for “Fingerspan” in the Wissahickon), whose family has a fascinating story related to the pier, which was once an immigration station.

Gallery below.

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Weekend Open House Pick: Passyunk Square

Photo via Zillow.com.

Photo via Zillow.com.

This former industrial building on Reed Street is not the only one of its kind — down the block there are at least two other buildings once used for industrial purposes, but the street has moved far from its workaday manufacturing roots. Need proof? It’s already cycled through the installation and destruction of a Shepard Fairy wheatpaste mural on its corner.

This building has been adapted into condos, and this “penthouse” unit is one of six. The neighborhood is one of row homes and one-way streets, and it can feel a little tightly drawn. But this apartment seems uncharacteristically spacious, perhaps due to its big windows, two levels and large deck. The listing copy recommends sitting on the deck with “a glass of wine or a favorite Keurig.” Further suggestions for Passyunk Square living: “Take the dog for a walk in a nearby dog park and chat with your neighbors about the local civic meeting and all the new developments.”

See for yourself, though, at this weekend’s open house. One thing’s for sure (or as sure as real estate gets): this zip code is good investment. Gallery below.

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