Almost Sold: $1.2M Hexagonal Home in Wynnewood

105 cherry lane wynnewood pa

Designed by late Philadelphia architect Henry Magaziner (son of the famous Louis Magaziner), this five-bedroom home was put on the market in April at $1,395,000, according to Realtor.com. Now it’s listed as pending sale at $1.2 million. Located on 1.6 acres, the unusual home features several unique details, most notably an eat-in kitchen with a skylight that looks like the portal to a midcentury modern spaceship. The home is rich with skylights and glass walls.

Below, a gallery of the home.

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5BR Center City Home for Less Than $1M

TREND photo via BHHS Fox & Roach- Center City Walnut

TREND photo via BHHS Fox & Roach- Center City Walnut

This home has a lot to offer for a five-bedroom, single-family Center City home priced under a million bucks. To wit: several fireplaces; a yard; one-year prepaid gated parking; a separate au pair suite with a full kitchen; multiple skylights, including one that leads to the roof via ladder; a covered portico balcony with great views; plenty of storage space; period details like tile and wood built-ins and hardwood floors; central air; a wood-burning stove in a bathroom; and a circular kitchen.

Why a circular kitchen should appeal is a mystery, but I find it very attractive. I suppose if I were a good cook, rather than a proficient microwaver, I would like the way a circle could facilitate a certain order to my food prep. But as it is now, I simply find it a comforting architectural detail. Like I kind of want to sleep in there.

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The Beury Building Is Up for Sheriff’s Sale

Photo by Laura Kicey.

Photo by Laura Kicey.

The poor Beury Building has not been rescued in Divine Lorraine fashion. In fact, the latest listings show that the foreclosed building will go up for Sheriff’s Sale on August 5. Mind you, it’s had liens on it since 2011 and could have gone to Sheriff’s Sale well before now, but that’s Philadelphia for you.

The building is owned by North Philly Works Inc., which is registered to New York-based entrepreneur Imar Hutchins–owner of Florida Avenue Grill in Washington, D.C. and no stranger to foreclosures himself. It’s also part of Shift Capital‘s portfolio; Hutchins is a Shift Capital principal, though its main number yields a voice mail for Shift founder Brian Murray, who’s out of town until July 29th. I left a message for a disembodied voice who may or may not be the robot for Imar Hutchins, and sent an email as well. Someone will get back to us to fill us in, I’m sure. Meanwhile, here is a spectacular gallery of the building taken by Laura Kicey.

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Morning Headlines: Flagship Wawa Closes; Locals Mourn

AP-first-wawa-940x540
Okay, that’s not true. Though the Greater Philadelphia area is taking this harder than James Garner’s death (RIP, Rockford), I doubt there’ll be a candlelight vigil — but note my use of the word “doubt,” because the region’s love for Wawa is (some would say irrationally) fierce.

deco daily times coverIt’s the front page of the Delaware County Daily Times, headline blaring: “1…and Done” and “End of the line for historic Wawa store.” To which I reply: WHERE WAS THE PRESERVATION ALLIANCE ON THIS? Working on the Boyd and the Blue Horizon? Priorities, people!

Barbara Ormsby, reporting for the Delco Daily Times, strikes a wistful note: “The Wawa on MacDade Boulevard and Swarthmore Avenue — the company’s very first convenience store that opened 50 years ago — will soon be gone, but won’t be forgotten.”

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Video: “Philly Home Portrait”

Photo by Cory J. Popp

Photo by Cory J. Popp

Austin Hodges and Billy Cress have a unique way of showcasing Philadelphia’s sly beauty: photographing its residential facades. Using the hashtag #phillyhomeportrait on the popular image-sharing app Instagram, they have between them more than 44,00 followers. Each photo they post gets hundreds, sometimes thousands, of likes. They’ve also self-published two books about the homes.

A short film called Philly Home Portrait — which comes online today — takes a deeper look at their process. “I love this story because it’s all about being aware of the everyday beauty around us,” says filmmaker Cory Popp. “It’s easy to pass these places without thinking twice, but these home portraits are a conscious effort to capture that beauty.”

Popp has taken the same kind of photos, and now has a dedicated site where prints are available for sale.

Video and stills below.

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Morning Headlines: A Northwest Philly High Line?

manayunk canal

Photo by Liz Spikol.

The Manayunk Bridge Trail Project got a Notice to Proceed from the city, meaning construction can begin. The idea is to connect the Cynwyd Heritage Trail to the Schuylkill River Trail via the Manayunk Bridge, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. Like many other local railroad structures, the bridge has been out of use for many years. Now it will be part of a bike/walk trail that will extend to Main Street, and even make it possible to walk from Manayunk to Lower Merion. Hopefully, this means more Philadelphians will discover the Cynwyd Heritage Trail.

There are even more heartening connections that will result:

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Home Where Charles Lindbergh Once Lived Is for Sale in Princeton

lindbergh house

TREND photo via Estately.

White Cloud Farm has a fascinating history, which is why we’re straying a bit from our usual coverage area and heading on over to Lawrence Township. In 1930, Charles Lindbergh, his wife Anne Morrow Lindbergh and son Charles Lindbergh Jr. rented the farmhouse here — one of three parcels now for sale — while their own home was being built in East Amwell. Anne  wrote warmly in her diaries of the time the family spent there. Of course, Charles Jr. would be kidnapped from the East Amwell home in 1933, when the family spent an uncharacteristic overnight at their as-yet-unfinished home.

On a brighter note, the farm itself later became, according to the listing, a world-class, record-setting Swiss dairy farm. Having grown up in the city, I am impressed without understanding why. It is now owned by an architect/planner/designer/gentleman farmer, and his wife, a designer of couture cake stands.

So what’s on offer?

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Video: The Latest Look Inside the Divine Lorraine

Photo by Jeff Fusco

Photo by Jeff Fusco

Oh, ye of little faith. That’s probably what developer Eric Blumenfeld wants to tell every naysayer who laughed when he bought the Divine Lorraine for the second time with dreams of turning it into a school or apartment complex. Now Blumenfeld has the funding to start renovations in about two months, according to his interview with KYW NewsRadio’s Hadas Kuznits, which draws out more of the story. Kuznits has also posted a number of YouTube videos in which she and Blumenfeld tour the site as it stands today. Last chance, most likely, to see it in its decrepit form.

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Morning Headlines: Why Don’t Some Suburban Homes Sell?

home-for-sale

The Inquirer’s Al Heavens reports today on the less sunny side of the Philadelphia-area housing market’s street: towns like Trevose, Oreland and Warrington. There, Heavens spoke with three would-be sellers who haven’t had any luck in a market that’s supposedly on the upswing.

The Trevose owners have had their home on the market for more than three years, even at the very low asking price of $92,000.

The three-bedroom Oreland Tudor has an asking price of $450,000.

“It’s a nice house with no deferred maintenance issues and several upgrades,” [the owner] said, adding that “after a small flurry of showings immediately post-listing, there’s been radio silence.”

In Warrington, Wirsch’s 1949, three-bedroom, 21/2-bath house on 2.93 acres in the Central Bucks District has been listed since April for $355,000. There have been just two offers, both in the low $300,000s.

The realtors Heavens speaks with points to a few factors that could help or hinder sales for these folks:

- Size of the firm. Bigger firms have more listings, therefore drawing more eyes to websites, and more experience in social media and marketing.
- Flexibility. If one kind of approach isn’t working, agents need to switch it up, possibly changing the way a home is categorized in the MLS, target-marketing, altering the price structure with a higher ask plus seller assist.
- Appropriate pricing. This is an obvious one, but one seller seems to have been bedeviled by a too-high ask. Prices should be comparable to other homes in the area.
- Reliance on Zillow/Trulia. The two sites don’t have the most up-to-date information, but sellers use them anyway.
- Accepting the right offer. In the Warrington case, realtors felt the seller should have accepted one of the offers, which were probably on target.

Area real estate market is recovering, but not for everyone [Inquirer]

More news, this way…

Four of Eight Homes Are Up on Race Street [Naked Philly]
Trump Plaza Confirms Plan to Close in September [Philly Mag]
Strange Odor Sends 100 Montco Residents Fleeing Homes [NBC Philadelphia]
Changing Skyline: Is ‘over-success’ in development hurting Phila.? [Inquirer]

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