The Full Spectrum

An oral history

Larry Magid: It didn’t matter if it was music or anything else in the building — it was the times, it was political. You wanted to have something sweep you up. We had an unpopular war, an unpopular president. We had rallying points, and people wanted change. It was the birth of popular culture. An event is only so much — the rest is social.

Bill Barber: That Soviet Union game [the Flyers played the USSR team on January 11, 1976] was a classic. North America was on the shoulders of the Flyers for that game. It wasn’t a series. It was one game.

Bob Clarke: They were the enemy. The big, bad Russians, and we were going to show them. We weren’t into politics, but I just hated them. It was narrow-minded and prejudiced on my part, but they didn’t like us, either.

Ed Snider
: This was the Cold War. There was hatred. The Russians left the ice, and I immediately ran down to the locker room. Their interpreter said, “They’re not coming back. You’re too rough.” I asked the NHL president if they’d been paid. They hadn’t been paid for any of the [North American] games. I said to the interpreter, “Tell them they’re not going to get paid.” They wanted Yankee dollars in those days, let me tell you.

Bob Clarke
: In fairness, the players didn’t pull themselves off the ice. It was their coaches or whoever who did that. But when that happens, you think the other guys are scared, just a bunch of chickenshits. [The Flyers won, 4-1].

Olga Korbut, Russian Olympic gold medalist [responding to our recent interview request regarding her 1974 gymnastics exhibition at the Spectrum]: I do not give interview for free.

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