Phillies Slammed for Reportedly Ratting Out Draft Pick to NCAA

Baseball America reports the team turned player who didn’t sign with them in to NCAA for a possible violation.

Oregon State Beavers pitcher Ben Wetzler. Photo |  Jaime Valdez, USA TODAY Sports

Oregon State Beavers pitcher Ben Wetzler. Photo | Jaime Valdez, USA TODAY Sports

The Phillies are a lot of things: A recent — okay, recent-ish — World Series champion. The baseball team with the most losses in history. And now, apparently, a bunch of narcs.

Let’s explain: When baseball players are drafted out of high school or after their junior year of college, they don’t have to sign with the team that drafted them. They can start or return to college — but if they want to preserve their eligibility, they can’t use an agent to negotiate with the team that drafted them. It’s all part of the NCAA’s framework of rules upholding the Victorian-era standard of amateurism in England.


But CBS Sports' Mike Axisa explains how it actually works:

One of the NCAA's many silly rules prohibits its athletes from using an agent to negotiate with professional teams, but many do and it is an open secret in baseball. The agents are typically referred to as "advisors." With thousands and sometimes millions of dollars being discussed, having proper counsel is imperative.

Yes! It is a good idea for young men to get the best representation so they're not screwed by their employers. Well, ha ha, Phillies' fifth round draft pick Ben Wetzler didn't sign with the Phillies and so Baseball America's Aaron Fitt says the team turned him into the NCAA for using an agent.

Basically, Fitt writes that because Wetzler didn't sign, the Phillies are attempting to vindictively harm his future earning power by narcing on him to the NCAA. He adds that, even though the Phils turned him in, that doesn't mean Wetzler actually broke any rules.

Naturally, reaction is running pretty heavily anti-Phillies — even moreso! — among baseball writers on Twitter.

Oh, yes, if you're wondering, this is a Phillies habit.

The Phillies aren't just content to ruin your summer with their crappy play anymore. It seems they want to pick on college kids, too.

Follow @dhm on Twitter.

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