Highlights and Missteps at Pickled Heron

Leah Blewett does experience some excellent dishes at Fishtown’s BYOB, Pickled Heron. Unfortunately there are also some stumbles.

Seared scallops are tender clouds drifting on sunchoke puree and a scattering of toothsome fava beans, the entire dish brightened by a judicious squeeze of lemon: early spring on a plate. The house-cured charcuterie includes mortadella with pistachios that is subtly sweetened with a hint of clove and brings life to the otherwise dry house-baked bread.

But for these highlights, there are twice as many missteps. The spring garlic soup, creamy and light, lacks salt despite a handful of duck prosciutto lurking beneath the surface. Veal breast is prepared porchetta-style, but the delicate flavor of the meat is lost, no match for the heavily breaded, fried white-bean cake served alongside; it’s essentially a refried bean croquette.

Pickled Heron in Fishtown Needs to Figure Out Where It’s Going [Philadelphia Weekly]
Pickled Heron [Official Site]

  • hh

    ouch…kind of an amateur review…

  • no

    Hh: Oh? What was wrong with the review?

  • Tex

    Hh probably objects to the number of colons and semi-colons. (I think the review’s very well done.)

  • hh

    Ha! funny…nah, just felt the criticisms were a little harsh and simplistic, thats all…not that i am an expert food writer and don’t pretend to be…but i do enjoy reading them nonetheless

  • William Shakespeare

    Never been to the place, have no opinion on it, and the review has a great intro, but when it comes to talking about the food itself the quote is college level at best:

    “Seared scallops are tender clouds drifting on sunchoke puree and a scattering of toothsome fava beans, the entire dish brightened by a judicious squeeze of lemon:”

    a tender cloud? sunchoked puree? toothsome beans? judicious squeeze? Adjective overload… and please, toothsome? Really? Reaaaally?

  • barryg

    I feel you on “tender clouds” but sunchoke is a food, not an adjective.

  • badjack

    I have to agree with Hh to an extent… it reads like a glorified Yelp review, and just feels sort of douchey and patronizing. Erace wrote a mixed review of the place a couple weeks back, replete with plenty of perceived missteps, but it still read as fair and good-natured criticism.

    And, for chrissakes, this business has been open for what, a couple months, and we already have to listen to random writers with a wider-than-deserved readership speculating on its survival:

    “if it hangs in there long enough…” and “One hopes that [it] will survive long enough to…” blah, blah, blah.

    Come on, now. If “one hopes” that it lasts long enough to do whatever it is “one” wants, “one” should not discourage people to eat there by creating a self-fulfilling prophecy by speculating on its existence and whining about how inconvenient it is for “one” to get there from wherever “one” happens to live.

  • PompousAss

    Seriously, what a pompous ass reviewer. PhuKing hack, try to do better yourself in a restaurant arsewipe, you can’t even write a five paragraph review.
    Nice summary Badjack

  • http://www.twitter.com/leeanneeats LeeAnne

    I feel like a lot of people may not want to visit this restaurant based on this review–not because the reviewer is less than thrilled with the food (everyone has their own preferences) but because of the way she goes on about the location as if the restaurant is located in Mt. Laurel and someone forced her to walk there.

    “This far-flung spot”
    “The location alone is a tough sell, a good walk from the Berks stop on the El through a neighborhood that could be generously described as up-and-coming.”
    “That “destination dining” appeal”
    “not yet worthy of a trip”

    I would like to point out that the restaurant is a few blocks from Berks Station. The walk should take any reasonable person between 5-8 minutes total on well-lit streets.

    Also…
    “Seared scallops are tender clouds drifting on sunchoke puree and a scattering of toothsome fava beans, the entire dish brightened by a judicious squeeze of lemon: early spring on a plate.”

    Okay, Ruth Reichl.