I’m Sorry, But Jennifer Lawrence’s New Dior Ad Is a Photoshop Fail

a_3x-verticalYou can stop reading now if you think this is going to be a rant about how models/actresses who work in the fashion industry shouldn’t have their images Photoshopped. It’s not. Because (breaking news!) this is the fashion industry, and it is what they do, and I will never cease to be amazed when people act surprised and outraged when a photo in a magazine is Photoshopped in a way that they consider “unnecessary.” So that’s all I’m going to say on that topic.

What I would like to say, however, about the new Dior campaign featuring actress Jennifer Lawrence, which came out late last week (and which everyone is inexplicably raving about), is that someone may have gone a tad too far in the shrinking department and veered into Photoshop Fail territory, at least as far as human-like proportions are concerned. Because look at the photo: Is it just me, or does the person staring back at you more closely resemble a pre-pubescent 12-year-old boy than the strong, broad-shouldered, post-pubscent Jennifer Lawrence we know in movies like Silver Linings Playbook and The Hunger Games? (And also, Winter’s Bone. Ever see that one? Sooooo good. It was streaming on Netflix for forever, but appears to be gone now, so you snooze, you lose.)

Besides the fact that I didn’t immediately recognize her when I first looked at the photo, areas of particular note include her far-too-narrow shoulders (which look weirdly uneven to me, by the way), and her head, which wasn’t shrunken down nearly enough to match her now-slimmer shoulders, giving her a definite bobble-head quality. I’ll let you form your own opinion about those cheekbones, but here’s the basic lesson here: When shrinking, shrink everywhere.

And in case you’re wondering, JLaw doesn’t much care when people futz with her body in post-production. Of her last Dior campaign, she told Access Hollywood, “That doesn’t look like me at all! I love Photoshop more than anything in the world…Of course it’s Photoshop. People don’t look like that.” I imagine a similar sentiment would apply here.

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