A Few Thoughts on the Death of Joey Vento

Why I found the cheesesteak king so infuriating

Quite a few years ago, I went down to Mexico to do some work at a dolphin facility. The vast majority of the employees were Mexican, and it was probably pretty obvious to them that I was getting paid quite a bit more during my few weeks there than they were. I worked hard and I tried to earn their respect, though they had every right to begrudge me.

A few nights after arriving, I went out for drinks with a few guys on the staff. We went to a small beer stand that had all of its seats outside. The guys I worked with ordered the first round of beers, and we sat around and chatted. At one point I went up to grab a couple of brews. When I came out, one of the Mexican guys I was working with who spoke fluent English (and didn’t demand that I speak fluent Spanish) asked, “How much did you get charged for those?” I told him $2.50 each. A more than reasonable price, I thought. He was apoplectic. He stormed toward the counter, screaming in Spanish. It turned out that the bartender had charged everyone else $1.50, but had charged me a buck more. He went up one side of the bartender and down the other, then came back to the table and said, “Come on, let’s get out of here. Nobody is going to treat a friend of mine like that.”

I still get goosebumps when I think about that. A guy I had only known for a few days had seen me as more than just some gringo coming in to make some money. He had stuck up for me when I got treated like shit by a bartender for the crime of not being from that country, and for not speaking that language. My friend didn’t see me as an American coming in to make money for a month and then blow out of town. He simply saw me as another human being, a fellow man who was deserving of respect.

And that’s perhaps why I personally found Joey Vento so infuriating. He took the complete opposite approach from my friend. He saw people working their asses off to make less money than he and his friends, but showed no respect for them. He saw them not as fellow humans worthy of his respect, he saw them as “invaders” who were “murdering like 25 of us a day … molesting like eight of our kids a day.” He took the debate from a reasonable one about how to deal with illegal immigration and turned it into a race war, bashing Mexican “anchor babies” and “drug dealers” every step of the way. Furthermore, he ripped the immigrants inability to speak English, calling them “morons.”

All of this without a hint of irony, despite the fact that his own English was highly suspect. And though he admitted that his first-generation grandparents never mastered the English language, he simply couldn’t understand why current first-generation Mexicans failed to do so, and mocked them for it. His supreme lack of irony would have been amusing had it not been so spiteful.

At the time Joey Vento opened Geno’s Steaks, his father was in jail for committing murder, while his brother was imprisoned for drug dealing. Undoubtedly, there were many Americans who at the time would have held the Vento family up as an example as to why America needed to stop admitting so many Italians into this country, and why Joey Vento didn’t deserve a chance to start his own business. (Make no mistake, there was until recently ample anti-Italian sentiment in this country.)

But anyone who did so was wrong. Joey Vento was his own man. He was not his brother; he was not his father. He was an individual, a human being. And because this is America, he got a chance. By working his ass off, he made the most of it. He turned a $2,000 investment into the most famous cheesesteak restaurant on Earth. He was the very embodiment of the American dream.

He walked and talked with a swagger, and he had every right to. In business, he became what every American who has started a business with little more than the change in his pocket and a dream in his head wanted to become. He had built more than a success—he had built an institution, and he had done it all through his own blood, sweat and tears.

But when immigrants came to his neighborhood, some legally and some illegally, most with the same dreams that Joey’s grandparents had—not coming with the hopes of striking it rich, but coming with the hopes that perhaps their grandchildren would have an opportunity to have a better life than they had—he treated them the way his grandparents had been treated by so many small-minded Americans 100 years ago. He had risen from humble beginnings into a position of power, and then used that power to oppress people because they spoke a different language, came from a different culture, and were a slightly different shade than his ancestors.

In his view, they (his most commonly used phrase in every speech I heard him make was “those people”) were not people trying to make things better for future generations that they might not even live to know, like Joey’s family had. “Those people” were “criminals” and “child molestors” and “drug dealers” and “murderers.” His appreciative audiences roared, and he was feted as a patriot by 1210 AM and FoxNews.

It was Thomas Jefferson’s dear Italian friend Philip Mazzei who wrote to Jefferson in the early 1770s that it was his belief that “All men are created equal.” Because Thomas Jefferson co-opted the phrase (Mazzei originally wrote it in Italian, but instead of insisting that he “Speak English,” Jefferson decided to translate it from the Italian) and used it in the greatest document ever written, Joey Vento got a chance in this great nation to make his dreams come true. He made the most of that opportunity, and his family and friends have every right to be proud of his incredible achievements. He not only ran an internationally renowned cheesesteak joint, Joey donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to charitable causes—$60,000 a year to a local hospice alone. In a city probably populated by more characters than any other city on earth, he was as colorful as anyone, and in the terrific documentary This Is My Cheesesteak, he came off as hilarious, charming and unique. If it wasn’t for the xenophobia, I have a feeling I would have really liked the guy.

I offer condolences to his family and hope that he rests in peace. But I regret that he became a hero for a small group of people who are looking for simple answers to complex problems, instead of a hero for a whole city. He was a remarkable man. It’s a shame that instead of being remembered solely for his business acumen, his gregarious nature, and his charitable heart, his legacy will also be that he seemed to believe that some people deserved to be treated differently because of their culture, language and country of origin. It is worth noting that there is a bartender in Mexico who feels the exact same way.

This piece originally appeared on JohnnyGoodtimes.com. You can also find Johnny Goodtimes at PhillySportsHistory.com, or follow him on Twitter.

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  • MBK

    “amusing it’s a pen name?” Anyway, great article. Very well-said.

  • Fast Eddie

    Having spent most of my life in Philly, with extended periods of time in California, I can say with certainty that mob violence which Joey Vento new first hand and railed against is the norm now in Cali and just as the waves of illegals move across the country the “flash mobs” that now alarm the cities will be mild in retrospect.
    When the Raiders met the 49ers on the football field, the best action was watching the warring gangs creating mayhem in the stands and parking lots. This is the direct result of lax immigration policy, and the broke and corrupt Government that won’t deal with the Illegal Cartels.
    These gangs are here and in your neighborhoods, and took over the action that the older entrenched mobs, his brother and father were a part of, that Joey fought from being extorted. That was his inspiration to support the Police; he chose to pay them off than the Mob.
    Nutter and the Demonrats can’t control the City now; your City is getting washed down the sewers without Hurricane Irene.

  • Pete

    Wow….this may be the single, best-written piece I’ve ever read on The Philly Post.

    It is a shame that Mr. Vento poured so much time and effort into his pet cause…maybe we would have known about some of the actual good works he performed if they weren’t overshadowed by his “speak English” demands.

    I’m all for speaking English in America, but this country is one founded by immigrants, including Mr. Vento’s own family. And not that many people can fluently speak a new language one year, let alone one week, after coming to a new country. But that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be able to enjoy a cheesesteak (though if they want to enjoy a cheesesteak, they’d probably want to stay away from Pat’s and Geno’s entirely).

  • Ann

    Great article! If each of us could take one line away from it and live it what a great place the City of Brotherly Love would be!! Thank you for putting the true spirit of humanity in writing?

  • Bicycle commuter

    Joey also felt that only children should ride bikes and when they do it should be in a parking lot or on the sidewalk. He was very openly opposed to sharing the road (and had such a nice Hummer to prove he was wealthy enough to not need to bike to work).

    So many people seem to love this guy but other than the fact that he was charitable to neighborhood church goers, I can’t help but agree with you. He could have been great for the city instead of great for his chosen few.

  • Penny

    For a guy who butchered the English language, he had the guts to tell other people to speak English. Did he really reach the six grade?