Without a Trace

In February 2005, Danielle Imbo and Richard Petrone walked out of a South Street bar and disappeared. No bloodstains. No evidence. No clues. As the trail grows colder, the question grows larger: What really happened that night?

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Richard and Danielle six months before they vanished.

To most anyone watching, they were just another couple, out on a Saturday night at Abilene’s on South Street, drinking a few beers and watching a band.

Never much for dressing up, Richard Petrone wore a gray hoodie, jeans and sneakers. But the night no doubt meant something special to him, because she was there.




A few weeks earlier, Danielle Imbo had ended their on-again, off-again relationship. She’d begun dating Richard during a long separation from her husband — a separation she was intending to punctuate with a divorce. She wanted time to focus on the transition from married woman to single mother. Richard said he understood; he’d raised a daughter on his own. But inside, he hurt. Danielle, five-foot-five, trim and pretty, looked like the real thing. She fronted a rock band around New Jersey and boasted a singer’s outgoing personality, and after the trouble she’d had with her estranged husband, she’d responded to Richard’s gentler approach.

They hadn’t spoken since she broke things off, blowing right through Valentine’s Day without even a text message. But tonight, on February 19, 2005, he had been alone, eating in a South Philly bar and working his cell phone, searching for someone to meet up with for a drink. He reached his sister, Christine, and found her enjoying a ladies’ night out with their mother, Marge, and two longtime friends, Felice Ottobre and her daughter.

Danielle.

Richard and Danielle’s relationship always bore this extra wrinkle: Danielle was his sister’s best friend, dating back to high school. Their moms enjoyed a friendship of their own.

“Want to come have a drink?” Richard asked.

Christine said no. But she put the invitation to Danielle. And two hours later, the reunited couple looked happy together. They sat close, smiling and laughing. They kissed. They compared notes on what their ensuing Sundays entailed: Danielle had a hair appointment at 11 a.m.; her ex-husband was scheduled to return their son after that. Richard, a NASCAR fan, planned to watch the Daytona 500. At around 11:45 p.m., they got up to leave.

Richard said he’d drive Danielle home to Mount Laurel before returning to his place in South Philly. And so, on a night when the temperature was about 27 degrees and the crowd at 4th and South was probably a little thinner than usual, Danielle and Richard walked out of Abilene’s toward Richard’s truck.

And vanished.

NOTHING HAS EVER BEEN FOUND — not a bolt, not a screw, not a purse or a hair, no clue at all — to explain what happened that night more than nine years ago. In the early hours and days after Richard Petrone and Danielle Imbo disappeared, their families banded together, frantically phoning each other the next morning when Danielle didn’t turn up for her hair appointment and both her cell phone and Richard’s kicked straight to voicemail.

Danielle’s brother, John Ottobre, had a key to Danielle’s house. He went in and found the place dark, still and undisturbed. But panic didn’t really set in until 3 p.m., when Danielle’s son, little Joe, was due to be dropped back home by his father.

“She wouldn’t have missed that,” John says now. “No way.”

Police often wait as long as 48 hours to consider adults missing. That night, John and Richard Petrone Sr. set out on a nightlong drive, John behind the wheel, rolling slowly along darkened city streets, tracing and retracing every major highway route and side road leading from Philly to Mount Laurel. Richard Sr., in the passenger seat, peered out into the dark, searching for his son’s truck. The pair crossed and recrossed the Walt Whitman, Ben Franklin and Betsy Ross bridges. At dawn, they returned home, exhausted.

Friends also swarmed into the picture. Volunteers fanned out a hundred miles in every direction. They carried pictures of Petrone’s black Dodge Dakota truck, knew its license plate — YFH-2319 — and the image of its NASCAR decal by heart. John paid $1,200 to get a Camden police officer to take him up in a helicopter to search. But in the end, they all found nothing — no truck off the road, no hulking shadow flickering beneath the water. A police officer tried to prepare John: “No one,” he said, “is ever going to find anything.”

“What do you mean?” John replied.

“It’s too clean,” the cop said.

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  • karbase

    He did it the ex he had the only motive and had some kind of connections that’s why there is no evidence and no trace of either of them. Very sad

  • Rob

    when the ex has an alibi of hanging out with law enforcement the night his ex
    wife goes missing you gotta wonder

    • Meed

      Kind of agree, but how would he have known she was with Richard? She broke it off, and it was by chance that they wound up at that bar. Nothing was planned. So even if he was listening to her voicemail, he would have thought she was hanging out with her friend (Richard’s sister) somewhere else.

  • MS

    I wanted to add the thing about the lie detector test … but forgot. While not fool proof. Why wouldn’t the FBI release the results – at least to clear the guy.

  • MS

    Meed – very very true. Also have to agree with some others too the ex looks like the only suspect.

  • Francesca

    My gut tells me some how some way, the x husband is the one who had this done, by people who are experts , they took them and the truck, killed them and did what ever to the truck, the x is the only one with a motive,

  • Paula

    This is actually the first time I’ve heard that the “date” at Abilene’s was a “spur of the moment” decision by Danielle. While it appears that the ex could not be the doer, he still could be behind the deed. He could have been having Danielle followed, with the order to kill them if she met up with Richie. The fact that the truck has never been found says to me that it and they were put through a compacter. Who would have had such hatred for either one of them to do such a thing? After all these years, it still seems to be only one man.

  • Dave

    This article is written very well. Thank you to the author for turning Richard and Danielle back into people who lived good lives for us all to learn about. Such a sad tragedy, for them and for the families. How do people, no monsters, who do this to others live with themselves?