North Star Bar Closing, No Live Music at Replacement

One less concert venue in Philadelphia.

Photo via Google Maps

Photo via Google Maps

The North Star Bar has hosted countless concerts over its 30-plus-year history at the corner of 27th and Poplar streets in the Fairmount section of Philadelphia. But those days are gone: The North Star is closing and its replacement will not present live music.

The North Star announced the decision on its website, explaining that the club will close for renovation on Saturday, October 17th and that when it reopens, the focus will be on food and drinks.

“A new name (unknown at this time), even better food, ‘more better’ beer for the beer garden (About time!),” reads part of the announcement. “On a changing times and sad note there will be no more music. With the area growing and changing and the ‘shaky’ nature of the music business it just doesn’t make sense.”

Although the North Star remains open through Saturday, all concerts have been cancelled.

New York-based performers Jackson Whalan and Black Space Odyssey were supposed to play the club on Friday night. “So the venue in Philly cancelled my show this Friday the 16th, because of some building renovations that are taking place and failed to notify me or any other artists on the lineup,” wrote Whalan on his Facebook page. “I am still open to playing in Philly this Friday, and am down to organize something on the fly that will be even better.”

Portland, Maine band SeepeopleS had a show scheduled for Saturday. “Our agent is scrambling to find a room as are all the bands booked at North Star for the next three months,” the band wrote us in a message. “Hopefully something will pan out. We are super bummed.” The band added that they were told that the North Star had already closed.

The North Star rarely presented must-see shows but did have its share of before-they-were-famous appearances, including the White Stripes in 2001.

See ya, North Star. It’s been real.

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