LISTEN: Kerkstra Talks Philly Fracking Boom on Radio Times

This morning on WHYY’s Radio Times, Philadelphia magazine deputy editor Patrick Kerkstra joined Mark Alan Hughes — professor of practice at PennDesign and faculty director of The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania — for a discussion of his October magazine feature on Philadelphia’s fracking-powered energy future.

Listen to the conversation with Hughes and host Marty Moss-Coane above, then check out Kerkstra’s piece, “Pipe Dreams: Philadelphia is on the verge of a fracking-powered industrial boom that could fundamentally reshape the city’s economy, landscape and image.”

Terry Gross Is Bad for the Country

Photo: William F. Steinmetz/Philadelphia Inquirer

Photo: William F. Steinmetz/Philadelphia Inquirer

Conventional wisdom holds that Terry Gross, host of WHYY-produced NPR staple Fresh Air, is the best interviewer in the business. Conventional wisdom is full of shit. Let’s start with her mannerisms. Sarah Miller captured them perfectly in her New Yorker parody “Gwyneth Paltrow Talks to Terry Gross About Conscious Uncoupling”:

GROSS: Okay, I wonder — could you maybe take — you know, like a typical scene from a breakup and describe it as though it were an opera? And then, maybe, could you describe the same scene through the lens of conscious uncoupling? Could you … do you think you could maybe do that, for us?

The hesitant, beseeching ingénue, so timidly obsequious — cut the crap, Terry. You’ve been doing this for 40 years. If you asked guests to strip naked and stick daisies up their arses, they would. Read more »

One of Us: Marty Moss-Coane of WHYY’s Radio Times

MO-marty-moss-coane-illo-andy-friedman-400x631

Illustration by Andy Friedman

My name is … Marty Moss-Coane, with a hyphen. I was a Marjorie, named for my grandmother. And I was a Marge or Margie until I was 10, when I said I was not going to be called that for the rest of my life. People went along with Marty. I was a bit of a tomboy, so that helped.

I grew up … in rural Massachusetts and rural Delaware in the ’50s and ’60s. I’m that old. And I grew up on boarding-school campuses, because my father was a teacher and then headmaster of a boarding school. You’ve seen Dead Poets Society, right? That was the campus I grew up on.

I came to Philadelphia … in 1969, when I dropped out of George Washington University. I had some friends in West Philadelphia who had an extra room.

If I weren’t doing this … I would be an elementary-school teacher in a Philadelphia public school with a good principal.

I live … in Bucks County, in a little Victorian with a wraparound porch.

One song I always turn up as loud as I can … is Gogol Bordello’s “Start Wearing Purple.” I love the gypsy punk sound. There’s just something about it. I saw them live, and I now have tinnitus. I blame it on them.

The thing most people don’t understand about my job … is how much homework is involved. Two hours live every day, five days a week — 10 hours a week. There’s a lot of preparation for what happens on the air. Since I never did my homework in high school, it’s my lot in life to do it now, as an adult.

My parents taught me … different things. My mom was an incredible listener. She had what we called “excessive attention disorder.” She paid hyper-attention to everything. And my dad had a great love for life.

If you come to my house for dinner … we will probably start the meal with soup. I’m a really good soup maker.

My first concert ever … was in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1970. It was Carole King and James Taylor. I was in Atlanta because as part of my dropping-out-of-college years, some friends and I had started a cooperatively run macrobiotic vegetarian restaurant. These days, I’m mostly vegetarian, although I sneak a piece of steak a few times a year. And fish. And hot dogs, because it’s not really meat. God knows what a hot dog really is.

One habit I cannot break is … biting my fingernails. It’s embarrassing. But I think I secretly enjoy it.

I think that Facebook … is losing its luster. Seemed like it was going to be more fun than it is.

When I arrived in Philadelphia, the city was … so drab. It is so much more colorful, younger, hipper and more fun now. I don’t even know what we did on the weekends back then.

If you really want to piss me off … run a red light when I’m trying to cross the street. It happens every day.

My favorite interviews on Radio Times have been … Christopher Hitchens, Salman Rushdie, James McBride, Maurice Sendak, and an Indian writer named Sherman Alexie. Interesting that they’re all men.

This summer, I hope to … play more tennis. My game is pretty good. I play a few times a week. But not nearly enough for my taste.

My secret talent … is that I’m a really good liar. I don’t do it every day, but I can use it very strategically.

I will do this until … I can’t remember important, everyday things.

Originally published as “One of Us: Marty Moss-Coane” in the June 2014 issue of Philadelphia magazine.

Ian Knauer Chef Dinner At Wyebrook Farm

Ian Knauer

If you’ve watched any Saturday morning TV recently (not counting cartoons), you might have caught Ian Knauer’s show The Farm on WHYY. Knauer, who spent almost a decade as a cook in the test kitchen of a little magazine called Gourmet, has returned to his roots, cooking, filming, writing and teaching from his family’s farm in Chester County.

And now, he’s teaming up with neighbor Wyebrook Farm to host another of their wildly popular chef’s dinners on Saturday, April 12th. Fifty guests will enjoy a complimentary toast of Victory beer followed by a menu of Spring produce favorites and Wyebrook’s pasture-raised meats.

Read more »

5 Questions: Chris Satullo on WHYY’s New Urban Reporting Project

l_satullo-300px-preferredThe Corporation for Public Broadcasting last week announced a $1.5 million grant to WHYY and public radio stations in Harrisburg and Pittsburgh to form “Keystone Crossroads,” a joint urban reporting program to be based at WHYY. Chris Satullo, WHYY’s vice president for news and civic dialogue, talked with Philly Mag about the project, about the problems facing Pennsylvania cities, and whether pushback can be expected from rural parts of the state.

Read more »

WHYY to Host New Public Radio “Journalism Center”

AP reports: “The Corporation for Public Broadcasting will fund a new journalism center in Philadelphia to allow public stations to work together on important projects. The nonprofit corporation has awarded a $1.5 million grant for the local journalism center, to be called Keystone Crossroads and housed at WHYY. The center will be a collaboration of public media stations across the state, including public broadcast stations in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Harrisburg. The center will focus on challenges facing the cities, including budget deficits and crumbling infrastructures.

Mike Nutter Hates WHYY Pledge Drives As Much As You

Every year I get suckered into thinking that my contribution to the local public radio outfit will somehow make the local public radio outfit stop asking me for money, as if my dial was linked into my personal account. (Wait, that’s an amazing idea. If NPR actually figured out a way to do this, donations would skyrocket.) In any event, Michael Nutter is just as annoyed as the rest of you with WHYY’s current fall membership drive.

Read more »

PHOTO: Meet Terry Gross’s Cat

Terry Gross did a cat show today. So her staff decided to throw some pictures of their cats up on Tumblr. The big gray feline lady up top–Mighty Mite–is Terry’s. (Can I call you Terry?)

The best of the rest? A Fresh Air key:

(Left) Associate Producer John Sheehan’s cat Molloy

(Right) Assistant Producer Molly Seavy-Nesper’s cat Sullivan

(Left) Executive Producer Danny Miller’s cat Spotty

(Right) Administrative Assistant Dorothy Ferebee’s cat Mr. Sweetie

(Left) Director Roberta Shorrock’s  cats Sully (in a bag) and Gracie (right)

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