Erdon Has Officially Opened In the Moorestown Mall

 

Image via Erdon.

The boutique is still waiting on its sign, but here’s what the exterior looks like. | Image via Erdon.

It’s finally here! After two decades in its former Marlton space, Erdon has set up shop in a somewhat unlikely new spot: the Moorestown Mall. (Yes, really.) Here’s what you need to know: The space is cavernous (2,500 square feet), it packs a larger selection of hard-to-find brands like Ivan Grundahl and Acne, and it’s every bit a high-fashion boutique—in a mall.

Keep reading for the scoop.

Are Suburban Schools Immoral?

suburban schools

Shutterstock.com

Quick question on the first day of kindergarten in Philly public schools: Is it actually immoral to take your kid and flee the city for suburban schools?

Silly question, right? After all, city families have been fleeing to the ’burbs (or to private schools) for decades. We don’t really blink at the process, because of course the right answer to the question is to do whatever it takes to get your child the best education possible.

Right?

But maybe there’s an alternative argument.

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Can Wild Boar Save the Suburban Mall?

Illustration by Kagan McLeod

Illustration by Kagan McLeod

THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT—THIS IS MARC VETRI’S OSTERIA. It’s 8 p.m. on a Saturday night, with a 45-minute wait and good-looking people standing three-deep at the bar. Ever-present beverage director Steve Wildy hustles in his ever-present dark gray suit, uncorking the second $75-plus bottle of red for two beefy guys who loom over a Lombarda pizza, which Food & Wine deemed the restaurant’s “signature” pie. Chef and partner Brad Spence, his whites strangely clean, surveys the dining room, which is tight and loud and thick with the aromas of braised rabbit and dry-aged rib eye and that magical wild boar bolognese. It’s exactly what we expect Osteria to be.

Except for one little hitch—the giant blue neon sign shining in through the front windows: SEARS.

Because here’s the thing: We’re not on North Broad.

We’re in a mall.

And not the swanky King of Prussia mall, or even the newly Nordstrom-ed Cherry Hill Mall.

We’re in the Moorestown Mall.
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Census: Philadelphians Are Moving to Montgomery County

Photo | shutterstock.com

Photo | shutterstock.com

Despite the fact that the American Dream has changed, and no longer necessarily signifies the white picket fence and 2.5 children living in the ’burbs, a Census report that was recently released includes Philadelphia and Montgomery County in the top 25 “pairs of counties with the largest number of people moving from the origin to the destination, minus people moving in the other direction,” according to Business Insider. (Net annual population flow from Philadelphia County to Montco between 2007 and 2011: 5,236.)

This means that large numbers of Philly residents left the city between 2007 and 2011 specifically to live in Montgomery County.

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All of the Philly Bars I Went to In My 20s Have Closed

lucy940

Photo | Lucy’s Hat Shop. Author not pictured.

The end of Sugar Mom’s marked it: The bars of my youth are gone. The places I haunted as a 20-something are closed. Alfa, Sugar Mom’s, Bar Noir, Mad River, Lucy’s Hat Shop — kaput. Add Khyber Pass to that list, too, because while Khyber today is a very nice restaurant, it looks nothing like it did 10 years ago: a grimy club bar with writing on the bathroom walls and a second floor that shook when the band played too loud — which was always.

Philadelphia was not the same back then, either, not when I got my ticket to drink legally in 2001. No one was trying to re-brand the Gayborhood for marketing purposes. The dining scene was Le Bec Fin — period. No one was trying to convert everything into a condo. Of course this was before the domination of Facebook and Twitter, but we’d never have created a hashtag to make ourselves feel better for choosing Philadelphia. We were not city snobs. We didn’t need to tell people why we hung out in the city, or scream for validation. We just did.

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The Millennial Revolution: We’re Committed to the City

Erica Palan, 28. Photo by Chris Sembrot

Erica Palan, 28

It’s 9 p.m. on a Saturday night, and my boyfriend and I are driving toward the Philadelphia skyline. We’ve had a lovely evening visiting friends who just bought a house in Ambler. We giggled at old photos, had burgers and beers on the deck, and played board games in a room with track lighting and Yankee Candles. Then we headed back home to Fishtown to begin our evening

“Let’s never move to the suburbs,” my boyfriend says as we sip lagers at our neighborhood dive bar. “I just think we’d be so … boring.”

He’s not alone. For many millennials, suburbia’s white picket fences are looking more and more like cages. In August, Leigh Gallagher, author of the new book The End of the Suburbs, told this magazine, “Millennials don’t really have any interest in this kind of cul-de-sac life. They’re not saying they hate suburbs entirely, but they want to be someplace where they can walk everywhere.”
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ThinkFest Video: Leigh Gallagher


Philadelphia native, journalist, and self proclaimed suburbologist, Leigh Gallagher, gives an informative talk about the major changes happening to the suburbs.

The American dream is at a pivotal point of change, as families abandon long commutes from their white picket fence suburban communities to move closer to the city. Thoughts from the public on suburban living from the public such as “dying slowly, one day at a time”, do seem a little dramatic—but it’s not all bad. “It’s not really the end of the suburbs, it’s really the beginning of something new, and there are more options.”

Big names in construction are beginning to notice this changing trend, and are now trying to deliver the best of both city and suburban living.

Philly Gets Richer, its Suburbs Get Poorer, and the Middle Class… Vanishes?

Photo | shutterstock.com

Photo | shutterstock.com

Something that hasn’t yet sunk into the regional psyche has surfaced in the local media: Philly is getting richer and its suburbs poorer.

That’s a slight oversimplifcation of the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s annual American Community Survey, but it accurately captures the general thrust of the trend.

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