This New Study Will Convince You to Stop Binge-Watching TV After Work

There’s nothing quite like getting home after work, hunkering down on the couch and catching up on ALL the Game of Thrones. But you may want to pick yourself up out of the dip you’ve created in your couch: A new study out of Australia links the hours of TV you watch per day with an increased risk of inflammatory-related death, Well + Good reports.

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How to Bounce Back From Failure (It’s the Opposite of What You Think)

When we fail, we’re often bombarded with Pinterest quotes telling us to stop dwelling on the past and Taylor Swift songs telling us to “shake it off.” But new research from the Journal of Behavioral Decision Making says otherwise. In fact, we should be reflecting on our failures, even though that’s usually the last thing we want to do.

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The Case for Eating More Fat, According to Two New Studies

Americans have been fearful of fat for decades (blame the sugar industry), and many still are. (See: low-fat yogurts galore lining the shelves of your local grocery store.) But good news for all the avocado addicts of the world: New research shows that getting a higher percentage of your calories from fat is linked with a lower risk of mortality, while getting a higher percentage of your calories from carbohydrates is linked to a higher risk of mortality.

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Study: This Is Exactly How Often You Should Be Moving If You Sit All Day

For years, we’ve been berated for sitting. It’s ingrained in our temporal lobes that sitting at home, at our jobs, and even on the plane is, long story short, killing us — along with making us gain weight, making us more prone to brain fog, giving us poor posture, and putting us at higher risk for heart disease. But what do most of us do? We read about the studies while sitting at our desks, feeling slightly guilty but probably not enough to, um, actually walk around the office. And no, your after-work barre class isn’t actually working against all the negative effects that come along with a full day spent in your desk chair — but a 30-minute alarm could, says as new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine

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Here’s Exactly How Long to Dunk an Oreo in Milk, According to Science

Attention, attention! The answer to one of the most pressing questions of all time — that is, how long should one dunk an oreo for the best possible bite? — has finally been discovered. That question, which we have surely all pondered at least once, was taken to the lab by a group of mechanical engineers at Utah State University who felt it was their destiny to determine the prime dunking time for an Oreo to be best devoured.

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The Checkup: The Happy Hour Mistake That Could Be Poisoning You

• Attention, all Moscow mule lovers: The Instagram-worthy copper mug holding your favorite delicious happy hour cocktail may be poisoning you. As public health officials recently pointed out, copper really shouldn’t come into contact with acidic food or drinks, like, ahem, the lime juice and ginger beer of a Moscow mule. Because when it does, copper can leach into what you’re consuming, which can lead to copper poisoning — and the abdominal pain, vomiting and jaundice that comes along with it. But don’t worry, you can keep throwing back your happy hour mules worry-free as long as you make sure the copper mugs are lined with another metal. [The Washington Post]

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The Checkup: New Study Links This Guilty-Pleasure Food With Increased Risk of Death 

• Womp, womp: A new eight-year study links chowing down on fried potatoes — we’re talkin’ fries, home fries, tater tots, and so on — twice or more a week with a significantly increased risk of death. Before you swear off fries for life, though, it’s important to note that it’s just a link; it doesn’t prove cause and effect, meaning there’s still more research to be done. Still, though, maybe try baked french fries for your next BBQ? [Men’s Health]

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The Checkup: Why Everyone Is Suddenly Obsessing Over Sourdough Bread 

• A new study pitted sourdough bread, often touted as a lower-glycemic and therefore healthier option, against white bread and found — dun, dun, dun — that the whole “sourdough is a low-glycemic option” might not be as clear-cut as we previously thought. In fact, for some in the study, consuming sourdough bread actually made their blood sugar shoot up more than plain ol’ white bread did. Gasp! [The Atlantic]

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