Why You Absolutely, Positively Need 7 Hours of Sleep

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Shutterstock

Prepare to cringe: For this study I’m about to tell you about, 164 men and women had a live common cold virus sprayed directly up their noses! So cringe-worthy, right? And what researchers found was that, of those 164 people, those who regularly skimped on sleep were way more likely to actually catch a cold, NPR reports. So, if you were thinking about staying up late to watch an entire season of Friends tonight, you might want to rethink your plans.
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Why Science Says You Should Really (Really!) Work Less 

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If you work upward of 55 hours on a regular week, you might want to cut back in the name of health (not to mention your sanity). New data analysis done by researchers at University College London found that folks who work 55 hours or more each week have significantly greater risks of stroke and heart disease than those who work the standard 35 to 40 hours a week, The New York Times reports.

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What Do Runners Think About? A Lot of the Time, They Think About How Much Pain They’re in, New Study Shows

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If you were looking for proof that long-distance runners are masochists, here it is: A new study, published in the International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, found that when runners aren’t thinking about their pace and distance during a run (which they do — a lot), they’re thinking about how much pain and discomfort they’re in and, occasionally, they think about their surroundings, the Atlantic reports.

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Are Biking Desks the New Treadmill Desks?

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The news keeps telling us that we’re sitting too much, particularly at work, and that it’s really hurting our health. As word has spread, solutions to our sedentary sickness have popped up, namely the treadmill desk. But according to ScienceDaily, there’s a new device out there that could change the active-desk game: How would you feel about pedaling — like bike pedaling — at your desk?
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Study: Eating Disorders Five Times More Likely in Transgender College Students

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Via Shutterstock

A disturbing new study out of Washington University at St. Louis examined trends in eating disorders between transgender and cisgender college students, and the results are published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The study’s authors found that “transgender students responded that they had been diagnosed with an eating disorder in the past year at an alarming rate of 15.82%. Cisgender students were between .55% (heterosexual men) and 3.66% (unsure men). Cisgender sexual minority and unsure men and women were 2-4 times more likely to have been diagnosed with an eating disorder than heterosexual men and women.” Read more »

Surprise: Gluten-Free Products Aren’t Any Healthier Than Their Gluten-Filled Counterparts

gluten-free cupcakes

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We’ve said it before: A gluten-free diet doesn’t necessarily benefit those who do not have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, and it certainly isn’t a weight-loss diet, despite what many people tend to think. And now, there’s even more scientific evidence to show that opting for a gluten-free product at the grocery store — unless you have celiac disease  or are gluten intolerant — isn’t the healthier choice, no matter how you swing it.

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STUDY: Binge-Watching Your Favorite Show Is Making You Depressed

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You may feel elated when you jump on the sofa to begin binge-watching whatever new show was just released on Netflix, but new findings suggest that happy feeling won’t last long. Well-being site Happify released an infographic based on a variety of studies on TV- and movie-watching that shows, among other things, that people who binge-watch tend to feel depressed and lonely. The study found that binge-watching causes a person to be less physically and mentally productive. So although your brain won’t actually turn to mush, sitting stationary for hours on end while not really accomplishing anything will certainly make it feel rather mush-y.

Other interesting tidbits illustrated in the infographic:

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Exercise Could Be a Legitimate Form of Therapy, New Study Shows

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We all know people who use exercise to clear their minds and, in some cases, to maintain their sanity. And new research shows that doing so could do the brain even more good than you might expect: A small study published in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy found that running can help to reduce the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, Runner’s World reports.

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