The Checkup: New Study Links This Guilty-Pleasure Food With Increased Risk of Death 

• Womp, womp: A new eight-year study links chowing down on fried potatoes — we’re talkin’ fries, home fries, tater tots, and so on — twice or more a week with a significantly increased risk of death. Before you swear off fries for life, though, it’s important to note that it’s just a link; it doesn’t prove cause and effect, meaning there’s still more research to be done. Still, though, maybe try baked french fries for your next BBQ? [Men’s Health]

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The Checkup: Why Everyone Is Suddenly Obsessing Over Sourdough Bread 

• A new study pitted sourdough bread, often touted as a lower-glycemic and therefore healthier option, against white bread and found — dun, dun, dun — that the whole “sourdough is a low-glycemic option” might not be as clear-cut as we previously thought. In fact, for some in the study, consuming sourdough bread actually made their blood sugar shoot up more than plain ol’ white bread did. Gasp! [The Atlantic]

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How When You Eat Breakfast and Dinner Affects Your Waistline

I am, without fail, always the first person to fall asleep at a sleepover. Things that should never be drawn on someone’s face have been drawn on my face more times than I care to share. Recently, at an adult slumber party — a PG one, guys. Get your heads out of the gutters — as all my girlfriends made s’mores, I snored next to them, asleep on the cement in my friend’s backyard. I was only mildly inebriated, swear.

Because I have always been a grandmother in terms of my sleep habits, I’ve long romanticized the idea of staying up late to settle down for dinner and a glass of wine around 10 p.m., like I live in Barcelona or something. But now I have validation that my inability to stay up (and/or eat) past 9 p.m. might actually be a blessing: A small new study out of the University of Pennsylvania looked at how the timing of meals affects health, and the news isn’t great for late-night eaters.

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Pass the Bread Basket: New Study Highlights Downside of Ditching Gluten 

Giving up gluten has been getting a bad rap lately: First, there was the news that folks who adhered to gluten-free diets had way higher levels of toxic metals in their blood and urine, and now, a new study, published in the BMJ, finds that, if you don’t have celiac disease or a diagnosed gluten sensitivity, ditching gluten could actually backfire when it comes to your health.

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New Research Will Make You Question All Your Drink Choices 

If you’re planning on drinking anything aside from water today, you’re going to take note of three studies that came to our attention this morning. One, dishing on an unexpected side effect of loving white wine, will certainly impact your happy hour decisions, while the others will probably make you think twice about reaching for a Coke (or Diet Coke) this weekend. Read up!

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Workout Incentive: Study Shows This Trendy Workout Wards Off Signs of Aging

Next time you need a little extra incentive to squeeze a workout in, remember this: A new study performed by researchers at the Mayo Clinic, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, found that high-intensity interval training — HIIT for short, which alternates short bursts of intense effort with periods of lower-intensity movement or recovery — can combat and even reverse signs of aging at the cellular level. How’s that for some icing on your workout cake?

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PSA: Here’s When You’re More Likely to Turn Into an Internet Troll

Internet trolls: We all know them. Some of us are them. Working on the internet, I have encountered more than my fair share, and I do often wonder to myself, Why, dear troll, are you screaming “I know of a place you can shove your hoagie!” to a complete stranger? (Yes, that is a real comment on a real Philly Mag post.) Wouldn’t your energy be better spent … somewhere else? Well, researchers at Stanford and Cornell looked into just that question of why people exhibit troll-like behavior, and it turns out, under the right circumstances, lots of people — yes, maybe including you — are capable of turning into all-caps-typing monsters. Much of it simply depends on mood.

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