Where We’re Eating: Stateside

stateside-header-medI somehow managed to not eat at Stateside until this year—totally missing its (admittedly brief) reign as the restaurant this magazine once called the best in Philly. Unfortunately, those glory days under chef George Sabatino are long gone. He left a year ago this month, and Stateside is now just another dimly lit bar with a big whiskey list and slow service. If you go, the poussin with burnt-honey-glazed cornbread and the octopus with chickpeas and fennel are worthy dishes. But with Noord, Fond, Laurel and Will just down the street? Maybe wait for Sabatino to get his next restaurant, Aldine, up and running in Rittenhouse.

Stateside [Foobooz]

First appeared in the March, 2014 issue of Philadelphia magazine.

Stateside Adds Brunch

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Image by Kate Kern Mundie

Stateside is rolling out brunch this Sunday. The East Passyunk bar is keeping its menu small for their first brunch but another South Philadelphia brunch option is definitely a good thing.

Brunch will be served from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The menu » 

Tonight: Deschutes Happy Hour at Stateside

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Kema Fortunato from Stateside is a big fan of Deschutes Brewery. So big in fact, he wants it to be a permanent part of his draft lineup. And to celebrate its arrival on tap, Stateside is having a Deschutes happy hour this evening featuring half-off Mirror Pond Pale Ale and select Deschutes bottles for just $3.

As always, oysters are a buck during the 5 to 7 p.m. happy hour.

Stateside [Foobooz]

First Monday at Alla Spina Features Elijah Milligan and Stateside

elijah-cropped-statesideTonight is Alla Spina’s monthly industry night and this month, chef Elijah Milligan and the crew from Stateside will be in the house.

Milligan is cooking up a taste of fall with cider braised veal short ribs and farro and apple risotto. Alla Spina’s Pat Szoke will also be bringing his braising game with beef shanks and more.

Stateside will also be mixing up some fall cocktails.

Read more »

About Last Night: And A Happy Rosh Hashanah To All…

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Last night was our 16th Open Stove night at COOK. Or maybe our 18th. The amount of drinking that goes on, it’s hard to keep track sometimes.

But anyway, it was, for certain, ONE of our Open Stove nights–this one bringing together Geno Betz, sous chef at Stateside, Anthony Passeri from Popolino (which is due to open back up again any day now, after their summer break), and their brave assistants for a culinary battle royale that would only end when one of them emerged victorious.

The challenge this time around? Making a New American cook and an Italian cook work with Jewish ingredients in honor of Rosh Hashanah. To that end, we hit ‘em with secret ingredient after secret ingredient–everything from honey and apple-flavored licorice to matzoh crackers (which, for some reason, caused Phyllis Stein-Novack to just lose her shit), Manishewitz (which also caused Phyllis Stein-Novack to lose her shit), pomegranite, gefilte fish, challah and so forth.

The two teams fought hard, talked some smack, drank shots, blew the time limit (more than once) and, in the end, it was Team Popolino that prevailed, having done everything from challah bruscetta with herbed gefilte fish spread to a bitter greens salad with apple licorice lardons.

It was a good night. It was a long night. It was a night full of drinking and surprises and something like ten courses of inspired seat-of-their-chef-pants cuisine. And if you missed it, just click through the link to see what it looked like on the inside of Open Stove 16.

Or 18. Or whatever.

Show me the pictures

Softshell Season Is Upon Us, Here’s Where To Find Them

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Soft shells with shoshito and honey at Stateside

We here at Foobooz World Headquarters have a soft spot for soft shell crabs. Some might get bummed out by the thought of biting through a shell, devouring a whole animal and all that. But us, we love the idea of crabby taste without the hustle or frustration of shucking anything. And softshell season is officially upon us. The delicious creatures have been showing up on more menus around town over recent days.

Here are where we’ve spotted soft shell crabs »

Stateside Continues Rolling Out New Dishes

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Chef Elijah Milligan continues to put his mark on the menu at Stateside. Late, last week Milligan rolled out his mid-Spring main menu. Among the items that caught our eye; seared foie gras with whiskey French toast, grilled grapes and ice wine vinegar; veal sweetbreads and  Stateside Stew, a stew of rotating house-made sausage, fresh fish and shellfish  plus vegetables.

Stateside Menu for Spring 2013 (PDF)

Stateside [Official Site]

The Gastronaut: The Next Exit

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High-profile chefs often leave the places they made famous. But few have caused the kind of  earthquake George Sabatino did when he announced he was leaving Philly’s best restaurant.

“When I opened this place, I was literally just trying to not run out of food.”

That’s George Sabatino, the now-former chef at Stateside on East Passyunk Avenue. He’s musing about his early days there as a young first-time exec—terrified and excited, exhausted, so busy he didn’t have time to blink. When owners Stephen Slaughter and William Bonforte brought him aboard, he’d never been in charge before. He wanted to make a restaurant that his chef friends would like. He wanted to focus on small plates, charcuterie and American whiskies. Most of all, he didn’t want to embarrass himself.

“Stateside was like this huge lucky break,” he says now. “I never knew it could get so big. I’m really surprised by it all, dude. I’m just a cook, you know?”

Read more »

Elijah Milligan’s First Menu At Stateside

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New chef Elijah Milligan just took over the kitchen at Stateside three days ago, but he’s already putting his stamp on the kitchen. Gone are the pickles, the cheeses and the heavy dependance on charcuterie that characterized George Sabatino’s board, but there are some interesting twists of modernity and locality in evidence here.

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