31 Best Philadelphia Tweets of 2014

Last year, I named my top 10 Philadelphia tweets of 2013. In 2014, I planned to keep track of my favorite tweets week by week.

Instead, I remembered I should try to compile the year’s best tweets sometime in October. I crowdsourced a few and went back through my favorites, and compiled a list of 31 of my favorite tweets this year. Some were chosen for their newsworthiness, but most were just jokes I liked.

My Favorite Philly Tweet This Year

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CB West Counselor Won’t Be Charged for Facebook Post

While saying her posts to Facebook were inappropriate and ill advised,” Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman said today Marykate Blankenburg would not be charged for posts about the die-in protest at the Eagles game.

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Firefighters, Paramedics Reminded of Social Media Policy Thanks to That One Dude

Philadelphia firefighters and paramedics received an email yesterday reminding them to review the departments’ social media policy. It was a standard reminder coming in response to nothing in particular.

Just kidding! It was in response to Philly paramedic Marcell Salters’s social media posts, which showed two men pointing guns at a police officer with the caption “Our real enemy… Need 2 stop pointing guns at each other and at the ones that’s legally killing us and innocents.”

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Outrage Over Philly Paramedic’s Anti-Cop Social Media Posts

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The above photo was posted to Instagram by Philadelphia paramedic Marcell Salters, along with the message, “Our real enemy … Need 2 stop pointing guns at each other and at the ones that’s legally killing us and innocents.” In another post, he wrote he “never did or will like police.” Geeze, generally when you don’t like coworkers you just grumble behind their back.

Obviously, these are posts that might get you in trouble any any job, let alone one where you work firsthand with police officers. “The fire commissioner believes this photo crossed the line,” CBS 3 reports. Obviously he does! Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer said he “thought it was disgusting.”

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Facebook and “Friends” in the Wake of Ferguson

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Scene from last Wednesday’s protest march (top); detail from a controversial post on the Facebook page of a Central Bucks West guidance counselor.

As a 29-year-old woman, this is how my Facebook feed tends to look: baby picture, wedding picture, baby-at-a-wedding picture, Supernatural spoiler (that last one might be my own contribution).

But over the past couple weeks, I’ve noticed an even less appealing trend: racist rant, thinly veiled racist rant, confusing meme that I suspect is a racist rant.

To clarify, I’m from the Northeast.

This is not, necessarily, to say that my hometown is any more backward than your own hometown. (Unless you’re from Amherst — you guys are pretty squeaky clean.) There’s an ugly, dumb contingent in every group of humans, and most of the time, I love that place. But post-Ferguson, I find myself rethinking my Internet relationship to the (Often, But Not Always) Great Northeast.

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Missanelli: The Real Story Behind the Victor Cruz Tweet

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We all have things we want to do when the job is over and after this week, I have decided that I’m going to create a chain of rehabilitation centers for Twitter addicts.

In 2014, you can get hooked on Twitter more easily than crack. Crack at least requires money that you have to get from somewhere. Twitter is free and can be used by anyone — from the boardroom executive to the 14-year-old boy postulating from his mother’s basement. Twitter can be informational and enlightening. And it can also be very dangerous — a phenomenon that gives everyone the power to publish any thought, without endorsement or accountability.  It’s where Average Joe can be judge, jury and hangman on any particular subject.  And it’s a power we plunge deeply into our veins like the worst addict in a dark and seedy alley.

When it’s all said and done, I’m going to do my part with these rehab centers. I know a lot about this topic because I have been both a Twitter player and a victim.

In the third quarter of Sunday night’s Eagles-Giants game, right after the Giants’ Victor Cruz dropped a touchdown pass in the corner of the end zone, I tweeted: “Hey Giants fans, Victor Cruz is over. Dance to that.” It was s spur-of-the moment tweet, which all of us in sports talk radio do from time to time. It was intended both to pander to the Eagle fan base for which I do my daily show, and to take a shot at the Giants, who occasionally infiltrate our area with their own brand of braggadocio. And on the surface, it seemed like a heartless thing to write, especially when Cruz subsequently collapsed with a ripped-up leg.

What got lost in the shuffle is that I never saw the player get hurt.

Many people, especially angry Giants fans, have asked how that is possible. Well, here is the story, letter by letter:

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OPINION: Does Fighting Hate Crimes With Hate Speech Really Help?

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Yes, I’m pleased that the three alleged gay-bashing suspects were finally arrested last week (although they are now out on bail). What they are accused of doing to the two gay men literally in my backyard is atrocious. I hope that, come their trial, they are convicted.

With that said, however, I’m super uncomfortable with the way my social-media feed looked this week in reaction to the capturing of the suspects.  Read more »

Brigitte Daniel’s Got a Plan to Get Young Women of Color Into Technology

Photo | Twitter

Brigitte Daniel |  photo via  Twitter

Like the Trayvon Martin story before it, what happened in Ferguson two weeks ago has had a continued news presence in part because of social media. In the moments that followed the shooting death of unarmed 18-year-old Mike Brown, users took to Twitter to report on and discuss what happened. They have started and maintained a nationwide online conversation.

Much has been written about the democratizing power of Twitter and the influential power of so-called Black Twitter; according to a Pew study, 22 percent of African Americans who are online are on Twitter despite representing a dismal 2 percent of its workforce, as indicated by a diversity report released by Twitter last month.

This imbalance does not go unnoticed by those in the field.

“If we are the highest consumers [of these technologies], why aren’t we creating them?” asks Brigitte Daniel, executive vice president of Fort Washington-based Wilco Electronic Systems, Inc., a minority-owned, family-based cable operator serving the greater Philadelphia area for over 30 years.

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10 Ferguson Twitter Accounts You Need to Follow

People protest Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014, for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo. As night fell Sunday in Ferguson, another peaceful protest quickly deteriorated after marchers pushed toward one end of a street. Police attempted to push them back by firing tear gas and shouting over a bullhorn that the protest was no longer peaceful.

People protest Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014, for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo. As night fell Sunday in Ferguson, another peaceful protest quickly deteriorated after marchers pushed toward one end of a street. Police attempted to push them back by firing tear gas and shouting over a bullhorn that the protest was no longer peaceful.

Since the death of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown last Saturday, residents of Ferguson, Missouri, have taken to the streets to protest. Long before major media were on the ground, Twitter provided to-the-minute updates of events, and continues to be the most reliable reporting resource. Below is a list of 10 individuals you should follow on Twitter if you want to know what’s really happening on the streets of Ferguson, because the likes of CNN can’t be trusted to even report what’s happening outside of its own doors:

1. Antonio French (@AntonioFrench), St. Louis Alderman of the 21st Ward.

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Ice Bucket Challenge: Stupidest Idea Ever

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I wish I could have been in the room when someone came up with the utterly stupid idea for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, wherein you dump a bucket of ice water on yourself (recording it for YouTube, of course) and challenge six others to do the same, or you donate $100 to the ALS Association, which combats Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Read more »

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