Police Investigating Report of Sexual Assault at Frankford High

Frankford High School via Google Maps

UPDATE: Police have arrested and charged an 18-year-old male and a 17-year-old male in what they allege was the attempted rape of a 14-year-old female student.

Police reportedly say the 18-year-old allegedly pushed the 14-year-old into a bathroom and attempted to sexually assault her while the 17-year-old stood outside. The incident was broken up when a teacher heard the girl yelling, according to police. 

The 18-year-old has been charged with attempted rape and related charges, and the 17-year-old has been charged with conspiracy to commit rape and other offenses.

Philadelphia police are investigating sexual assault report at Frankford High School.

The PPD said they received a report of a female student being sexually assaulted at the school, located on the 5000 block of Oxford Avenue in Frankford, on Wednesday.  Read more »

City Controller: Staffing Shortage Could Cause Schools to Lose Funding

teacher vacancies

Photo | It’s Our City via Flickr / Creative Commons

Philadelphia City Controller Alan Butkovitz issued a warning on Wednesday that some Philly schools could lose funding because of staffing shortages.

First, some background: many schools in the Philadelphia School District receive funding through the state’s Title I grant, which goes toward institutions with high populations of students belonging to low-income families.  Read more »

Uber and Lyft Give Philly Schools a Boost for the First Time

Promotional photos from the press kits of Uber (left) and Lyft

Promotional photos from the press kits of Uber (left) and Lyft

Data released by the School District of Philadelphia on Thursday show that Uber and Lyft, which were both illegal at one point in Philadelphia, brought in more than $44 million in their first two months of legal operation across the state, according to the Inquirer. And, in the first fruits of a tax agreement, school leaders announced that the district would receive nearly $358,000 from the ride-sharing companies.

Legislation signed by Gov. Wolf in November that allowed the companies to operate statewide included a 1.4 percent levy on each ride provided through the companies’ apps. Previously, when Uber and Lyft operated under a temporary court reprieve, they were taxed at just 1 percent per ride. Read more »

« Older Posts