QVC Owner to Pay $2.4 Billion for Online Shopping Site

Mike George, CEO of QVC, will new responsibilities after the deal is completed.

Mike George, CEO of QVC, will new responsibilities after the deal is completed.

QVC is getting a new e-commerce partner.

QVC’s parent company Liberty Interactive Corp. has announced that it will pay $2.4 billion for Zulily, an e-commerce site specializing in limited-time sales of toys, clothes and apparel aimed at millennial moms. The company will join West Chester, Pa.-based QVC Group to bolster its digital e-commerce platform. Read more »

Market Report: Celeb Fashion Finds You Can Actually Afford

Celebs-style

Yep, these celebs wear fast-fashion, too. | Featureflash / Shutterstock.com, Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com, Allan Bregg / Shutterstock.com.

  • Apparently celebs love styling on a budget as much as we do. Behold, Gigi Hadid, Miranda Kerr, Kendall Jenner and other stars sporting affordable brands like Topshop, Asos, and Forever 21, proving that you can make any outfit look like a million bucks with a little bit of sharp styling and a whole lot of confidence. [Huffington Post]
  • Because we all do it even though we know we shouldn’t, here are some pimple-popping best practices from dermatologists to minimize scarring. (The cold, hard truth: Wait for the white.) [The Cut]
  • West Chester-based QVC just bought Zulily for $2.4 billion, which means millennial moms can find more adorable maternity and baby clothes at discounted prices. And also QVC is taking over the world. [Forbes]

Next: The latest Asian beauty trend? Heart-shaped bangs. (Yes, really.)

How QVC Turned an Obsolete Genre Into an $8.8B Business

Meet Mike George, the CEO of QVC.

Meet Mike George, the CEO of QVC.

QVC has gone from a business in danger of being obsolete to an industry-leading powerhouse.

With the rise of big e-commerce players like Amazon and eBay, the home-shopping business model could have become stale. So the West Chester, Pa., retailer named Mike George CEO in 2006 after he served as chief marketing officer and general manager at Dell.

Now, QVC is an $8.8 billion empire with 17,000 employees broadcasting in six countries (soon to be seven when it opens QVC France). It shipped 173 million products in 2014. Read more »

From “Junk” to Shark Tank’s Biggest Success Story

Aaron Krause, president and CEO of Scrub Daddy.

Aaron Krause, president and CEO of Scrub Daddy.

A funny thing happened in 2008: A very profitable Philly-area startup company nearly sold its patent for peanuts. Now it has $50 million in revenue and has become Shark Tank’s biggest success story.

Long before Aaron Krause invented Scrub Daddy — the smiley-shaped sponge with the rough exterior that doesn’t leave scratch marks — he was in the car-washing business. An excitable inventor by nature, Krause created a buffing pad adapter with quick-connect technology. Once it started to disrupt the market, mighty multinational conglomerate 3M took notice. Early deals to acquire Krause’s company (called Dedication to Detail) included 12 of Krause’s other patents — including a weird hand-scrubbing sponge called Scrub Daddy.

“They said we don’t want this sponge thing,” Krause recalled. “They said ‘you keep all those patents — we just want the buffing pad business.’ We didn’t know what Scrub Daddy was. They didn’t know what Scrub Daddy was. We put it in a box and called it scrap. The product was completely dead and sat in that box for five years.” Read more »

We Have Found the Best Gel Nail Polish Ever

Gel

Truth bomb: My mother-in-law keeps QVC in business. Single-handedly. She gets deliveries from the West Chester-based retail empire on a near daily-basis. She’s on a first-name basis with the UPS guy.

I don’t ever shop at QVC. I’ve been to the main campus (yes, it’s a campus), which is beyond huge and could probably secede from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and start its own independent state. Former QVC queen Lisa Robertson would be president.  Read more »

VIDEO: QVC In Hot Water After “Racial Mocking”

QVC

Left, the model. Right, the hosts. (And shiny bag.) | Screenshots from YouTube.

QVC, the empire of perpetual televised consumerism inexplicably plopped in the middle of sleepy West Chester, is battling backlash after a host made a live, on-air comment about bad hairstyles at the same exact time a camera panned to an African-American model sporting natural hair.

Poor timing, or a thinly veiled dig at natural African-American hair? Some bloggers were quick to decide:

Bougie Black Girl“Two White QVC hosts mock a Black Woman’s natural hair and humiliate her on TV.”

Bossip: “Race Matters: White QVC Host Apologizes For ‘Making Fun’ Of Beautiful Black Model’s Natural Hair Live On The Air.” 

Misee Harris: “Is QVC Racist? White Host Mocks Black Model’s Natural Hair.”

A blogger on Bougie Black Girl, the first site to post a reaction to the clip, wrote this (questionable capitalization hers):

“Apparently the White women hosts on QVC felt like it was OK to insult a Black woman who has natural hair. If you don’t know what QVC is, they are the folks who sell products on live TV. Check out the models reaction. It says it all.  I am heartbroken for her. In 2015, I am not surprised that it is still happening. What surprised me was how their hosts felt entitled to judge and humiliate a Black woman on TV.”

Here we go.

Read more here.

WATCH: Gay QVC Host Gets Surprise Marriage Proposal Live on TV

Exuberant British QVC host Will Gowing was thrown for a loop recently when his boyfriend surprised him with a marriage proposal while he was busy hocking goods on air. Gowing and his cohost Alison Young were just about to wrap up a live segment when Young asked him to read “one last message” that appeared on the teleprompter. It was a sweet proposal from his boyfriend of nine years, Steve. Did he say yes?! Watch the clip above to find out.