10 Best Books on Amazon Kindle Unlimited: Fiction

Back in July Amazon opened up its Kindle Unlimited subscription service to the U.S., throwing their hat in the ring to be the “Netflix of books.” For just $9.99 a month, users can access over 700,000 e-books on their Kindle e-readers, through the Kindle app for iOS, Android, Windows Phone or Blackberry, or on their desktop.

Having access to this library is a boon for bookworms—that is, if they can figure out what to read. With so many titles to choose from and, frankly, quite a few duds, the choices can be a bit overwhelming. We’ve dug through their fiction selection to find the best books on Kindle Unlimited for you to download.

71qsXVeH9oL._SL1500_The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers (1940)
Often named one of the best novels of the 20th century, McCullers’ modern classic debuted when she was just 23. The story follows a deaf man named John Singer and the friends he makes in a small Georgia town in the 1930s. Singer’s life changes when he is separated from his mute companion and meets heroine Mick Kelly, a tomboy who loves music.

Up the Down Staircase by Bel Kaufman (1965)
This novel is the original “young idealistic teacher fights bureaucracy and small budgets in an inner-city school” tale, but it’s told through inter-office memos, students’ notes, suggestion box ideas, and lesson plans. After spending 64 weeks on the New York Times best-seller list when it debuted, it was adapted into a film in 1967, becoming an instant classic.

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Former Philly Mag Intern Is a Pulitzer Winner

There’s one other Philadelphia-related Pulitzer Prize we failed to take note of: Will Hobson, a former Philly Mag intern who now reports for the Tampa Bay Times, won the award for a series of stories he co-authored about homelessness.

The Tampa Bay Times reports: “The award was given to Times staff writers Will Hobson, 29, and Michael LaForgia, 30, whose reporting on the county’s Homeless Recovery program revealed that the agency — created in 1989 to provide transitional housing for the poor — funneled millions of public dollars to slumlords and placed families in unsafe living conditions.”

Hobson’s LinkedIn page notes that at Philly Mag, he “fact-checked and researched several pieces for the magazine. Wrote reviews of a film and a novel, and a short piece for the front section of the book.” Clearly, these were the skills he needed to win the Pulitzer. Hobson went on to be Inquirer’s Chester County correspondent for two years before moving to Florida.