Philly Ranked Third Unfriendliest City, But at Least We Have a Great Arts Scene

Photo | Jeff Fusco

Photo | Jeff Fusco

Philly’s always had a reputation for being kind of grumpy, but perhaps never more so than lately when we’ve got our panties in a wad about the disruptive pope visit. Then there was that whole hitchBOT thing that made national headlines, making us look like the biggest meanies ever. Just last week, Seth Meyers called us out in one of his opening monologues for basically beating up people for no reason.

These moments haven’t escaped Travel + Leisure readers, who ranked Philly No. 3 on its list of “America’s Unfriendliest Cities,” just ahead of Detroit and New York City. Here’s what editors had to say about our particular brand of angry:

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Poll: Trump Leads GOP Contenders in Pa.

Via Shutterstock

Via Shutterstock

Donald Trump‘s apparent popularity with GOP voters continues to climb.

Trump is the leading Republican candidate in three swing states — Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida — in a just-released poll by Quinnipiac University.

In Pennsylvania, “Trump leads among Republicans with 24 percent, followed by 13 percent for Carson and 10 percent for Rubio,” Quinnipiac reports. “No other candidate tops 7 percent, with 9 percent undecided.” Read more »

The Brief: Who’s Even More Popular Than Mayor Nutter?

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey. AP | Matt Rourke

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey. AP | Matt Rourke

Michael Nutter is so, so popular. We know because he commissioned (and his political committee paid for) a new poll proving it. His approval rating stands at 57 percent. That’s pretty good!

But you know who’s way, way more popular than Nutter? Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey. Nutter’s pollsters asked what Philadelphia’s thought of Ramsey, and a staggering 75 percent approved of the job he was doing, while just 11 percent disapproved. Citified figures there’s not a public official in Philadelphia who could come close to touching Ramsey’s numbers. Read more »

Philly Likes Mike—Again

Matt Rourke | AP

Matt Rourke | AP

Perhaps it’s that he looks awfully good compared to those who are trying to replace him. Perhaps it’s that Simon Van Zuylen-Wood‘s terrific profile finally convinced the city that it would miss him. Or maybe it’s Nutter’s hard sell of his legacy is working.

Whatever the reason, Michael Nutter just got a glowing report card in a new poll which showed that 57 percent of Philadelphia approve of how the mayor is doing his job (36 percent disapproved). Just as critical, 45 percent of those polled thought the city was on the right track (compared to 40 percent who thought it was going the wrong way). A robust 57 percent answered optimistically that the city would be better off in five years than it is today. Read more »

Poll: Majority of N.J. Residents Don’t Want President Chris Christie

A new poll from Quinnipiac University says that New Jersey residents are less than enthusiastic about a Chris Christie presidency.

Though he’s won two terms as governor with relative ease, 53 percent of Jersey residents think he’d be a bad president. Forty percent think he’d make a good chief executive. Quinnipiac has been asking this question since 2010, when 61 percent of New Jersey residents thought he would not make a good president. (The high for Christie was 44 percent “bad president” and 41 percent “good president” — in March 2013.)

“Even Jersey guys, actually Jersey girls, don’t think the nation will go for a Jersey guy like Gov. Christopher Christie,” Maurice Carroll, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, said in a press release. “Shades of Woodrow Wilson. The last Jersey guy who got elected president did not carry the state in his 1916 reelection. And this poll shows we haven’t changed in the last century.”

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Potato Week: The Sweet Potato, Friend Or Foe?

Okay, so here’s the thing. We could make it through Potato Week without ever mentioning the humble sweet potato. We could gleefully thumb our noses at the thugs from the Sweet Potato Defense League and all their starchy ilk and completely ignore the most recent few years of culinary development in which the sweet potato has played a minor (though vitally important) role. We could ignore the pies, the fries, the waffles and pates, the mashes and smashes and stuffings and all the other things that are being done with sweet potatoes today and, in an iron-clad commitment to genetic purity, only lavish our Potato Week attentions on the solanum tuberosum end of the tuberous plant spectrum because, after all, the sweet potato (or ipomoea batatas), is only a distant relative of the potato, linked taxonomically at order solanales but then diverging rather markedly into the family of morning glories and other poisonous leafy things.

Vote for or against the sweet potato »