2014 Philadelphia Geek Awards

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Excitement reigned on the sidewalk outside The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University on Saturday night as the 4th Annual Philadelphia Geek Awards got underway. Guests, nominees, and presenters walked the red carpet and posed for photographers before heading into the museum to enjoy the the 90-minute cocktail reception held among the many fascinating exhibits in the museum including full sized dinosaurs, fossils, live butterflies and animal dioramas. Some 400 guests were dressed in “Geek Chic” and ready to party.

The Academy staff was also circulating with live snakes, owls, lizards, and bugs, and many people — including yours truly — took #Selfies to share with the world on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook (#PhillyGeekAwards). Then the moment arrived when Geekadelphia co-founder Eric Smith and editor Mikey Ilagan opened up the ceremony with witty banter and gracious appreciation of the sold-out crowd.

Throughout the 90-minute ceremony, awards were given and the audience was entertained by the humor of the presenters and winners. Those geeks are smart and funny. The after-party was held at North Bowl, and was well attended. Many of the ladies told me they were excited to take off the heels and slip into some comfortable bowling shoes.

More photos and full list of winners from the 2014 Philly Geek Awards after the jump »

The DIY King of South Philadelphia

Photo by Zach Robbin.

Photo by Zach Robbin.

The 2000 block of Washington Avenue is not where you would expect to find one of the biggest startup hotbeds in all of Philadelphia. Tile and building supply stores are crammed into nearly every available inch, filling the air with a must that threatens to choke you any given second.

But a well-hidden doorway leads you inside the 21,000-square-foot “gym for innovators” best known as NextFab, a DIY nirvana for metalworkers, 3-D printers, and everyone in between.

Peterson Goodwyn is inside, perpetually hard at work crafting the building blocks for the next generation of DIY-ers to enter the world of audio recording.

Treading along a path that NextFab has installed for guided tours, Goodwyn points out a massive lathe in the corner, and a water jet that operates at mach 4, all of which he has access to as a full-time member.

But the people Goodwyn is most intent on reaching are those who may not even know how to handle a soldering iron. Goodwyn wants to capture the largest untapped market in the DIY industry—the beginner.

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