Philly Museums Offering Sleepover Nights in 2016 — For Kids and Adults

Sleeping bags in Dino Hall | Photo courtesy of Academy of Natural Sciences

Sleeping bags in Dino Hall | Photo courtesy of Academy of Natural Sciences

When’s the last time you had a sleepover with friends? How about in a museum underneath a formidable dino or Egyptian sphinx? That’s the kind of idea that the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University’s museums have in mind. Starting in January, the Penn Museum‘s kid-friendly sleepover series returns through the summer, as well as a few dates for a youth-oriented scavenger hunt and sleepover event at Drexel’s Academy of Natural Sciences. But don’t worry, adults: there’s also an opportunity for a no-kids allowed, grown-up-style sleepover for you to enjoy solo at the Academy. More details below so you can get a head’s up on your 2016 planning.

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New Book Tells the Story of Sphinx Sculpture at Penn Museum

The Sphinx when it was moved to the Lower Egyptian Gallery in 1926.| Photo courtesy of Penn Museum

The Sphinx when it was moved to Penn Museum’s Lower Egyptian Gallery in 1926.| Photo courtesy of Penn Museum

If you’ve taken a trip to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology, you’ll probably recall being greeted by an enormous granite sphinx in the Egyptian gallery. Bearing the name of Ramesses II, it was excavated in Memphis, Egypt from the temple of the god of creation, Ptah. But the sphinx is as lively as it is elegant — two years ago, it celebrated its 100th anniversary in Philly with a large party hosted by the Museum.

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Penn Museum Offering $10 Admission Through the End of August

Penn Museum

The Penn Museum is offering an affordable escape from the summer heat. From now until August 31st, guests can enjoy museum highlights for only $10.

This summer’s special fee offers access to the museum of archaeology and anthropology’s international collections, like the Egyptian mummy gallery, Africa gallery and Greece gallery. And unlike a lot of special-deal packages at museums around town, this one actually includes its special exhibitions. Discover the extraordinary burial rituals of an ancient civilization at “Beneath the Surface: Life, Death and in Ancient Panama” or witness the unveiling of contemporary Native American identities at “Native American Voices: The People-Here and Now.”

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Outdoor Summer Concert Series Returns to Penn Museum This Month

Photo courtesy of Penn Museum.

Photo courtesy of Penn Museum.

Wednesday nights are eclectic in University City. For the sixth year in a row, Penn Museum welcomes the Summer Nights Series Concerts to Philly. Come and enjoy outdoor concerts every Wednesday night from 5 to 8 pm in the Stoner Courtyard. The event is free to Museum members and for children under 6. General admission is $10, which includes admission to the Museum. The Penn Museum’s International galleries will remain open during concerts, and there is and option to attend a docent-led mini tour in between sets starting at 6:30 p.m.

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M. Night Shyamalan to Host Free Discussion Next Week at the Penn Museum

M. Night Shyamalan and his wife, Dr. Bhavna Shyamalan. | Shutterstock.com

M. Night Shyamalan and his wife, Dr. Bhavna Shyamalan. | Shutterstock.com

Filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan and his wife, Dr. Bhavna Shyamalan, will speak at the Penn Museum next week in what will be the first public program hosted by the M. Night Shyamalan Foundation (MNSF). The organization supports the grassroots efforts of leaders who are “working to remove the barriers and eliminate inequities created by poverty.”

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15 Holiday Events Worth Your Time in Philadelphia

IndependenceSeaport

The Seaport Parade of Lights is Saturday, December 13th. | Photo via Facebook.

You froze while site-seeing, you can’t get the Nutcracker theme out of your head, and you finished shopping last month. What now? Get out and warm up at one of the city’s festive holiday gatherings.

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13 Things To Do In Philly This Week: Volunteer at the Philadelphia Marathon, Get Drinks With The Sphinx, See BalletX Fall Series and More

 

Penn Museum Rediscovers 6,500-Year-Old Skeleton

penn museum uri skeletonThe Penn Museum recently announced it has re-discovered a skeleton in its own archives. The skeleton, which had been in a “coffin-like” box in the basement of the museum for 85 years, is thought to be about 6,500 years old.

The museum knew it had a “mystery” skeleton in the basement for years now, but it had lost the identifying information on it. It simply sat there, unidentified and untouched. It wasn’t until the museum began a project to digitize records from archaeological expeditions to Ur (what is now southern Iraq) in the ’20s and ’30s that it was able to identify the skeleton.

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Penn Museum Rediscovers Ancient Skeleton In Storage Room

This morning, the Penn Museum announced that it found a 6,500-year-old (!) skeleton that had been hidden away in its storage closets. More Philly Mag News:

penn museum uri skeleton

Drs. Janet Monge and William Hafford investigate the 6,500-year-old skeleton. Photo: by Kyle Cassidy.

The museum knew it had a “mystery” skeleton in the basement for years now, but it had lost the identifying information on it. It simply sat there, unidentified and untouched. It wasn’t until the museum began a project to digitize records from archaeological expeditions to Ur (what is now southern Iraq) in the ’20s and ’30s that it was able to identify the skeleton.

One of the skeletons the Penn Museum received after an expedition was marked as missing in 1990. But William Hafford, who led the digitization effort, and Janet Monge, the curator of the physical anthropology section of the museum, were able to connect this record of a skeleton.

A visual inspection made by Penn Museum archeologists revealed the skeleton was that of a man, who lived to about 50 and was “well-muscled.” The museum has about 2,000 complete human skeletons in its collection.

Monge was just named Best of Philly’s Best Museum Curator. You can read more about her work with the mystery skeleton, and what the Museum hopes to learn from it, here.

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