Bread Wizard Alex Bois Is Back With Lost Bread Co.

Lost Bread Co.’s Smoked Malt Potato Buns/Alex Bois

Alex Bois, the James Beard Award-nominated baker behind the artisan bread program that brought well-deserved national attention to Ellen Yin and Eli Kulp’s High Street on Market, has a new venture.

Since his exit from High Street last fall, Bois has left, er, breadcrumbs on Instagram as to what he’s been up to — like the thick, hearty “fatbread” pizzas that popped up at Helm this winter, a brainstorming list of names for a potential new bakery, and finally, a video of golden-brown soft pretzels baking for Morgan’s Pier.

His new project, in partnership with Avram Hornik’s FCM Hospitality, is Lost Bread Co., a wholesale (and eventually retail) bakery.

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Parks On Tap is Back for 2017

ParksonTap

On a cold and gray day like today, it’s good to look forward to spring and summer. It’s even better to look forward to spring and summer knowing that the return of the sun, the warmth and the flowers will also mean the return of Parks On Tap.

Last year, the Fairmount Park Conservancy, Philadelphia Parks and Rec and FCM Hospitality all got together and thought, “Hey, you know what would be cool? If we put together some kind of mobile beer garden that went around from park to park, allowing people to hang out in hammocks and drink in the sunshine.” And then they did exactly that.

And this year, starting on May 17 (which, really, isn’t all that far away), they’re going to do it again with another full season of Parks On Tap.

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The Ultimate Fairmount Park Bucket List

Photo via Fairmount Park Conservancy

Photo via Fairmount Park Conservancy

The thought of venturing into the quiet, green, EL-less land that is Fairmount Park can seem a bit intimidating when what you’re used to traipsing around in is an environment made up of grey concrete, confidently dodging speeding SEPTA buses and those clipboard-holding people who are always, without fail, planted along Walnut Street. (You know, the ones who force you into saying awful things like “No, I don’t have a minute for dying otters. SORRY.”)

After all, what’s one to do with all that obstacle-free nature?

But it’s time to get over your fears: This summer, the Fairmount Park Conservancy put together an awesome, pretty detailed map of Fairmount Park, identifying Indego stations, key trails, bike lanes and SEPTA bus stops speckled throughout its 2,050 acres. And along with that map, they’ve compiled a list of 50 Fairmount Park activities worth experiencing — a bucket list, if you will — from fitness-related activities, like playing tennis at Chamounix’s hard courts, getting your downward dog on at Lemon Hill and running Boxers’ Trail, to more Instagram-worthy (and leisurely) activities like picnicking in the Azalea Garden and enjoying the views from the bluffs in Laurel Hill Cemetery.

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Scratch Biscuits Closes

The Dixie from Scratch Biscuits

The Dixie from Scratch Biscuits

Scratch Biscuits, the quick-serve biscuit sandwiches spot at 1306 Chestnut Street by chef Mitch Prensky, closed after a year in business. Prensky posted a photo of the closure notice, hanging in the window of Scratch Biscuits, on Facebook today. Prensky thanked all his customers who gave the store a try.

He also says Scratch Biscuits will continue to appear at Night Markets and at other pop-ups throughout the summer. Follow @ScratchBiscuits on Twitter for more announcements.

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Beer Garden Yoga: Parks on Tap Hosting Pay-What-You-Wish Yoga All Summer

Parks on Tap | Photo via Facebook

Parks on Tap | Photo via Facebook

Calling all yogis! We have the perfect Saturday plans for you for the rest of the summer (you’re welcome). We just learned that the folks over Rittenhouse’s Maha Yoga are hosting pay-what-you-wish yoga classes every Saturday at Parks on Tap, the floating beer garden that’s popping up at Philly parks all summer long.

YASSSSSSSSSSSSS. Read more »

Two More Beer Gardens For You To Visit This Weekend

ShofusoGarden

Seriously, I know that people like drinking outside and that, for years, we had to fight just to see one or two beer gardens open for the summer. But now it seems like these things are opening/popping up/changing location every weekend, and pretty soon we’re going to get to the point where there’s one on every block.

Not saying this is a bad thing, just… Man, how things have changed.

Anyway, there are two new beer gardens for you to explore this weekend. And the first one also comes with sushi.

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Why Real Philadelphians Instinctively Hate Shiny New Things

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Who could roll their eyes at this? The author could.

Not long ago a treasured possession of mine — an audio tape my dad made when I was about four — got ruined. Somehow the tape in the cassette disappeared and now when I try to play it there’s a vast nothingness where sound should be. On the tape, I am pretending to be a lecturer at the Academy of Natural Sciences, schooling my dad in all kinds of animal facts — some true, some invented, and some attributed to Mommy, who was giving me some seriously inaccurate information (the natural diet of the elephant is not, in fact, buttered popcorn). When I’d get off track, my dad would prod me: “And where do giraffes live, Elizabeth?” “Africa!” That kind of thing.

A lot of people have such keepsakes — childhood recordings and home movies. The fact of the tape itself wasn’t unique. But I kept this tape in a special box, so that I’d never lose it, for two reasons. First of all, one side is comprised, entirely, of my dad methodically repeating curse words — “Shit. Shit. Shit. Fuck. Fuck. Fuck.” — slowly, in a grave tone. He sounds like a serial killer, but it’s also weirdly hilarious. He used to leave the tape playing for his parrot, Miles, hoping the bird would pick stuff up. He never did.

The other reason I treasured this tape was because it contained absolute, touching proof of my Philadelphia origins — proof that was better than a birth certificate because it could be heard in one key exchange:

“Where does the hippo live, Elizabeth?” my father asks.

“In the wooder,” I say. Read more »