Former Philly Artist Pens Grindr Opera

Photo via Facebook.

Erik Ransom | Photo via Facebook.

No, it’s not Verdi, but the plot of GRINDR: The Opera reads like something you’d find staged at Opera Philadelphia or The Met (and we think that iPhones would be allowed throughout the performance). From the synopsis:

We meet GRINDR, a mythical siren from remote antiquity who has been awoken from her millennial slumber by technology. Her power, which is derived from human lust, is exhibited as she manipulates her gay devotees in a soaring soprano…GRINDR: The Opera is entirely sung-through and intended to be staged with a cast of five actors: The four men and the Siren, GRINDR, who is intended to be a masked man in drag.

Read more »

A Tale of Two Verdis, a 100 Miles Apart

Dmitri Hvorostovsky and Sondra Radvanovsky in the Met Opera's 'Un Ballo in Maschera.'

Dmitri Hvorostovsky and Sondra Radvanovsky in the Met Opera’s ‘Un Ballo in Maschera.’

The fact that two major opera companies within 100 miles of each other are concurrently staging Verdi’s Don Carlo has caught national attention: Opera Philadelphia’s production opened Friday night starring Eric Owens, who is regular Metropolitan Opera fare (and excellent in his role debut as King Philip II here at the Academy), while the Met’s production wrapped up this weekend, ironically featuring Philly’s own Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin leading the work.

Leah Crocetto and Dimitri Pittas in Opera Philadelphia's 'Don Carlo'

Leah Crocetto and Dimitri Pittas in Opera Philadelphia’s ‘Don Carlo’

But just as serendipitous is the fact that last week, both companies opened two different dramatic Verdi operas—Un Ballo in Maschera at the Met and Carlo at Opera Philly—within a day of each other. Ironically, both productions have eerie similarities in their stagings, and yet, despite the sameness, they are as different as can possibly be.

Both productions take liberty by moving the opera’s plot out of the traditional era in which it is normally set and moving it into a nondescript time period. The Met’s Ballo, a revival of the 2012 production by David Alden, has the feel of a turn-of-the-century film noir, although some moments feel even more modern: The great ballroom scene is literally wall-to-wall mirrors, which causes nearly a blinding effect from the audience’s point of view. Carlo in Philly, staged by Tim Albery, employs a rather dystopian setting, part Spanish crusades, part post-apocalyptic war zone. The stage is highly raked with a giant dome upstage that seems to be some sort of portal to the outside world. It’s eerie.

Read more »

IN THE WINGS: The Cast of Opera Philadelphia’s Don Carlo

Verdi’s classic tale of a love triangle gone wrong is taking shape at the Academy of Music as Opera Philadelphia presents Don Carlo. We wanted to lighten up the otherwise tragic tale, so we sat down with the opera’s three leads, Leah Crocetto (Elisabetta), Michelle DeYoung (Princess Eboli), and Dimitri Pittas (Don Carlo) and had them take our rapid-fire Q&A about their experiences on stage and, boy, did they reveal some interesting secrets!

Leah Crocetto

Leah Crocetto

Leah Crocetto

My name is … Leah Joanne Crocetto, the first born daughter of Richard and Marcia Crocetto of Waterbury, CT and Brookfield, CT, respectively.

I am a … superhero. No. But if I were a superhero, I would want my super powers to be the ability to fly. Invisibility would be to hard: There would be too much information to glean. Flying. Yep! Flying is the ability for me. I would, of course use my super power for good and quick travel. It would come in handy in this job.

On opening night … my family will be here! I am so excited whenever they are in the audience. I will also look into the balcony and feel my dad with me. I dedicate each performance to him.

Read more »

The Interview: Philly-Born Opera Great Eric Owens

The Philly native turned bass-baritone opera great has performed in concert halls the world over. This month he returns to star in Don Carlo at the Academy of Music. Opens April 24th. 

Eric OwensGive us your Philly bio.
Born and raised in Mount Airy. Went to Central, then Temple and the Curtis Institute of Music. And Settlement Music School. So my connection is not at all tangential.

Why opera?
I started out with piano and oboe, but I had been a fan of opera for quite some time, since I was eight or nine—just listening to it on LPs. I saw Tosca at the Met at 16, and opera won the battle.

I know you’ve performed at the Met, Carnegie Hall, throughout Europe. Any favorite houses?
Well, actually, the Academy of Music. It’s the oldest continuously operating opera house in the country. It’s just beautiful.

Read more »

A Sneak Peek at Opera Philadelphia’s 2015-16 Season

Isabel Leonard.

Isabel Leonard.

Opera Philadelphia announces their 2015-16 season today, and we’ve got a first-hand preview of the divas and divos they are bringing to town to belt their brains out. Opera enthusiasts will recognize many a famous name as they peruse the upcoming talent that will take to the stage to perform classic tunes from Verdi and Donizetti, plus a few new arias they’ve never heard of before in works making their East Coast or world premieres. You’ll even note some very well-known Philly-bred artists will be making their company debuts. Read more »

WATCH THIS: Opera Diva Joyce DiDonato Singing at Stonewall Will Leave You In Tears

Joyce DiDonato Stonewall

Well, I sure didn’t think I’d be bursting into tears first thing this morning as I was scrolling through my newsfeed on Facebook, but leave it to extraordinary opera singer Joyce DiDonato to change all that.

DiDonato, an extremely open advocate for gay rights, recently filmed a performance of “When I Am Laid in the Earth” from the opera Dido and Aeneas at the historic Stonewall Inn in New York City’s Greenwich Village. She’s surrounded by many a gay icon, too: Temple alum and DOMA-defeater Edie Windsor and playwright Terrence McNally (whose Mothers and Sons is opening this week at Philadelphia Theatre Company) are both in the bar crowd as DiDonato sings a passionate rendition of the aria.

The recording was made in memory of Mark Caron, the gay man who was shot and killed several blocks away from Stonewall. New York City police said the shooting was clearly a hate crime.

“The idea of a murder happening blocks away from the Stonewall Inn is incomprehensible to me,” DiDonato said in an interview with NPR, who also produced the recording. “It shouldn’t happen anywhere. It tells me that we’re not done talking, and we are not done working for people to comprehend what equality is about and why it is important.”

This isn’t the first time DiDonato has spoken out for LGBT rights: The singer dedicated a rendition of “Somewhere Over The Rainbow” at the London Proms concert to gay men and women in Russia who were being persecuted. At the Santa Fe Opera, she dedicated her performance to a gay New Mexican teen who killed himself after being bullied:

Santa Fe Opera

Opera Diva Deborah Voigt Coming to Free Library

Deborah Voigt Header

Deborah Voigt was fired because she was too fat.

I hate to start a piece about the extraordinarily talented Ms. Voigt by pointing out her weight—this is an artist who has literally had standing ovations that have lasted a half-hour after her iconic performances of Aida and interpretations of Wagner. However, that’s the story everyone knows about the soprano after her very public 2003 termination from the Royal Opera House‘s production of Ariadne auf Naxos. Voigt, who, at the time, weighed in at nearly 330 pounds, literally could not fit into a black dress that designers created for the opera. And this was all a secret, until she told the truth in an interview several months later. Read more »

Wilmington’s Susan Stroman Makes Sloppy Met Debut in The Merry Widow

Renee Fleming in "The Merry Widow."

Renee Fleming in “The Merry Widow.”

Halfway through a bawdy can-can dance number at Maxim’s, which is supposed to be the height of Susan Stroman‘s new production of The Merry Widow at the Metropolitan Opera, the stage curtains unexpectedly fell this past Tuesday night: There was a major technical malfunction that caused the show to come to a complete halt for nearly 30 minutes. Kelli O’Hara, the Broadway chanteuse making her operatic debut in this Widow, was in a split, held high in the air by her fellow performers. She jokingly shouted, “It’s a party!,” which caused the audience to laugh uncomfortably. Read more »

The Death of Klinghoffer : The Opera So “Controversial,” You Can’t See It in Philly

A scene from The Death of Klinghoffer.

A scene from The Death of Klinghoffer.

When I arrived at the Metropolitan Opera in New York to see The Death of Klinghoffer, the John Adams’s work that has caused an international uproar, I was expecting tensions to be high at the theater. However, I was not prepared to have my Kiehl’s shopping bag confiscated and checked (along with every single bag opera goers brought into the venue).

The security measures were extremely tight, almost ridiculously so: I purchased a bottle of water at the concession stand and was not permitted to bring it in the auditorium. This isn’t a house rule, mind you; it was a rule for this particular production.

To be frank, I was intimidated, overwhelmed, and a little on-edge before the opera even started. But then, the house lights dimmed; the orchestra and chorus began the Prologue, titled “Chorus of Exiled Palestinians,” and I left the insane world the Met administration created to get into the opera house to see a piece of art; I took in what I would argue is one of the most profound modern opera works that has been produced by the company. Read more »

« Older Posts