Turney and Safran 13th Street Update

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Valerie Safran and Marcie Turney at a still under construction Lolita | Photo by Jack Cotter

There’s always a lot of going on along the Thirteenth Street empire of Valerie Safran and Marcie Turney, although recently, it has been extra newsworthy.

Craig LaBan visited the post BYOT Lolita and rewarded the Safran and Turney’s original restaurant two-bells, though he predictably does gripe about the noise.

What’s happening at 13th and Locust » 

13 Diners You’ll Find in Philly

Illustration by Jessi Falcone

The Winos | Illustration by Jessi Falcone

We here at Foobooz certainly enjoy Philadelphia’s food scene but that doesn’t mean we don’t occasionally roll our eyes at some of the other dining room’s tables. Here is our list of the thirteen kinds of diners you’ll find in Philadelphia. Who do you recognize, what behavior are you guilty of?   

Compiled by Isabelle Gallicchio, Ela Torres and Alex Tewfik

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Guide To the Jersey Shore Guides

Photo by Jason Varney

Diving Horse | Photo by Jason Varney

It’s Friday, the ocean is calling your name, it’s going to be absolutely beautiful both today and tomorrow. Leave work now. The Internet has spoken, and here’s all you’ll need to know about where and what to eat this weekend. Read more »

Three Critics Walk Into a Chat Room

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Craig LaBan’s online chat this afternoon will feature LaBan talking with City Paper’s Adam Erace and Philadelphia magazine’s Trey Popp. Stop by Philly.com at 2 p.m. to ask the trio about restaurant criticism, anonymity or what their favorite restaurant is (because we’re sure they never get that question).

UPDATE: Here’s the direct link to the archived chat.

Craig LaBan Restaurant Chat [Philly.com]

Did We Create This Culinary Monster?

Illustration by Kagan McLeod

Illustration by Kagan McLeod

There’s been a lot of talk lately about what kind of restaurant town we really want to be. In the Philadelphia magazine that’s on the stands right now, I’ve got an essay asking what it means to our restaurant scene when being merely great is no longer a guarantee of success. We’ve been writing an awful lot about VolverJose Garces‘s new high-stakes (and high price) gamble at the Kimmel Center which now stands as the most expensive dinner in town by a long stretch. And as we all know by now, between knee-capping reviews from both Craig Laban and our own Trey Popp, and a whole lot of people on the streets wondering if the storied Walnut Street address might be better off if it was just turned into a Jamba Juice and ignored until all the ghosts of Le Bec-Fin have departed, Avance is having itself a very rough month.

And now, with all this in mind, I just ran across this essay over at Esquire’s “Eat Like A Man” blog which essentially lays the blame for every modern sin in restaurant-dom squarely at our feet.

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Craig LaBan’s Ultimate Guide to Chinatown

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Photo by Jeff Fusco

Everytime you walk through Fujianese soup dumplings  you can find a new culinary discovery. Such was the case as Craig LaBan discovered Chinese Restaurant, a nondescript storefront where LaBan finds Fujianese soup dumplings and delicate wontons. That is just one of the discoveries the Inquirer’s food critic reveals in this guide that takes you from Chinese waffles to the best duck in Chinatown.

Chinatown: The Ultimate (but never, ever complete) Eating Guide
How to speak like a ‘neighbor’ in Chinatown
The best duck in town (Gallery)
Chinatown’s flying fish

Craig LaBan’s Year in Bells

Photo by Jim Graham

Photo by Jim Graham

Craig LaBan’s Year in Bells came out last weekend. The annual feature includes some revisits to restaurants reviewed earlier and the announcement of a Chef of the Year award.

The Saint James in Ardmore, which was skewered a year ago in its initial review has now been upgraded to a single bell (hit-or-miss). Citron & Rose, which lost its partnership with Michael Solomonov and his Zahav team maintained its two-bells, based on the strength of new chef, Karen Nicolas.

Tiffin Bistro and Red Owl Tavern rounded out the revisites. Each managed to hang on to their one bell ratings but frankly, each sounded lucky to have done so.

Chef Eli Kulp, who came to Fork and High Street on Market from New York’s Torrisi Italian Specialties was named Chef of the Year. LaBan said of Kulp’s cooking, “his knack for unexpected combos and rustic techniques (offbeat pastas, fermenting, charcuterie) produced grand presentations like his whole-duck feast – a multi-part poultry masterpiece that was among the best birds (and meatballs) I’ve ever eaten.”

Craig LaBan’s Year in Bells [Philadelphia Inquirer]

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