Must-See Gallery: Moorestown Home With An Interior You Won’t Believe

328 W Main Street, Moorestown, NJ, 08057

328 W Main Street, Moorestown, NJ, 08057

In 2004, John Kunkler spontaneously signed the first papers to an 1843 former tenant house, which he had previously rebuffed while house-hunting with partner Carol Williamson. What happened next turned into one of the more creative redesigns Property has seen in a while.

According to a 2008 2008 Inquirer article, the couple hired architect Thomas Wagner and design firm Goldthorpe & Edwards (whose portfolio makes us go Ohh, I see when juxtaposing it with this home) and set off on a whirlwind remodeling that included the property being expanded from 1,200 square feet to a sizable 4,000 square feet.

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Moorestown Mansion With Alhambra-Meets-Rittenhouse Landscaping

1 Cobblestone Ct.

Built by the person who was to live in it, this New Jersey gem seems to have all the right touches. From the grounds, which resemble a cross between the gardens of Alhambra and a street-lit Rittenhouse (see gallery below!), to the home’s splendiferous interior, this four-acre property doesn’t seem to be miss a beat.

The foyer has marble flooring, an open-ended staircase, and curved walls. Standard rooms include the dining room, living room with ten-foot ceilings and two-sided fireplace, and a kitchen with Brabaker cabinetry, custom lighting and backsplash. A built-in banquette and custom table make up the breakfast nook.

Bedrooms, among which is the expansive master suite, can be found on the upper level.

Now here are the extras:
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Contemporary Dwelling Designed by Herman Hassinger Has Two-Story Atrium

420 Pleasant Valley Avenue, Moorestown, NJ.

420 Pleasant Valley Avenue, Moorestown, NJ.

The late Herman Hassinger may have settled in Block Island, Rhode Island in his later years, but the architect who served as President for the AIA Philadelphia chapter in 1971 had hometown roots in Philly, as per this snippet of a November 2012 article from Philly.com:

Mr. Hassinger was born in Germany, his wife in Philadelphia. The two met in fourth grade in Mount Airy and married at age 21.

Mr. Hassinger graduated from Central High School and the University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor’s degree in architecture.

Hassinger, who established Herman Hassinger Architects in Moorestown, New Jersey prior to relocating to Rhode Island, went onto earn a number of awards with his firm. Tragically, while on their way to a Board of Trustees meeting of which they were long-time members, the architect and his wife, Doris, passed away in a plane crash on October 25, 2012. More on Hassinger’s legacy here.

This Moorestown home, built in 1980, was designed by the beloved architect, and has an atrium–inspected and certified last month– with quarry tile flooring. The atrium also stands at over two stories and serves as a sunlit division between the living and sleeping quarters.

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Basque-Style Home Blazes Across the Market

301 Haines Drive, Moorestown, NJ.

201 Haines Drive, Moorestown, NJ.

The Basque Country and its culture are one of a kind, but to find a home inspired by its architectural stylings is even more rare. Truly an unexpected find, this Moorestown gem whose design was inspired by the French portion is situated along the boating and fishing-friendly Strawbridge Lake, which has a park with playgrounds and picnic spaces right across the bank.

Thus, it’s without surprise that the home–listed just last month–is now pending sale. The custom-built property was built in the Basque cottage house style circa 1970 by an artist. Inside the home, Botticino marble floors cover the foyer and there are “Peek-a-Boo” fireplaces throughout. Additionally, the tall window in one of the sitting areas has a Church-like lunette with colorful designs, a feature echoed back in the wine cellar’s distinctly arched doors that look to be made of stained glass.

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Meticulous Colonial Reproduction in Moorestown

lfdd39544-m0rA reproduction of the historic Tayloe House in Moorestown, NJColonial homes are great because they bring you a little sliver of what it was like to live in them 250 years ago. For the same reason, they’re also terrible. In 1750, there were no two-car garages, or built-in basement entertainment centers, or custom mahogany bars with Sub-Zero wine refrigerators, or granite countertops, or in-law suites complete with minibars. But what if you could have it both ways? All the flashy new stuff, right there along with the colonial history?

That’s exactly what’s offered in this “authentic Williamsburg reproduction” of the Tayloe House on East Main Street in Moorestown, NJ.

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French Normandy Estate Along Rancocas Creek With Its Own Private Chapel

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Things in this home that are original to its 1840 construction: plasterwork, crown moldings. Things that were probably added after its 1999 restoration: James Dean’s head, appliances by Sub Zero, Viking, Bosch and Gaggenau. This seven-bedroom estate was built and restored in French Normandy style along the Rancocas Creek in Moorestown. Waterfront views look a little more Normandy than Jersey, too.

The room count alone in this estate is stupefying. There are two parlors, a great room, a formal dining room, a sunroom, a formal rotunda and a game room in addition to the bedrooms and half-baths. There are three (three!) walk-in “storage rooms.” And that’s just in the main house. The property also features a detached three-car garage, a guest house, a pool house and its very own chapel. The 8-acre plot also includes three other detached garages.

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Three Bells for Osteria Moorestown

osteria-moorestown-wine-940

Craig LaBan has tons of praise for Marc Vetri’s Osteria outpost at the Moorestown Mall in New Jersey. Not the least of which is the cheaper wine prices. But other dishes stand out as well.

My ultimate Osteria splurge, though, is the $36 lobster spaghetti, a dish so intensely infused with lobster-ness – the sauce enriched with tomalley and roe, plus a stock fortified with shells – that casual seafood pasta eaters might not love it at first. But with the tender meat from a 11/2-pounder twined up in the al dente strands, a flicker of spice, brandy, and basil lighting the sauce, it was soon impossible to resist. (Plus, it’s no longer available in Philly.)

Three Bells – Excellent

Osteria Moorestown: A Vetri marvel at Jersey mall [Philadelphia Inquirer]
Osteria – Moorestown [Foobooz]

Happy Hour Starts at Osteria Moorestown Tonight

osteria-nj-400Osteria Moorestown is rolling out happy hour tonight. The happy hour or more precisely, happy hours run from 3 to 6 p.m. and include drink specials plus free bites to eat. Grissini with pecorino and prosciutto, polenta panino with taleggio and porcini mushrooms and pizza al taglio will all be available free of charge.

Drink specials include red and white wines for $5, Menabrea beer for $3.5 and $7 specialty cocktails.

And with happy hour at Osteria Moorestown being a seven day a week deal, it’s worth noting that the Regal Moorestown 12 is now open for business. Osteria happy hour followed by a movie? That’s a solid date night.

Osteria Moorestown [Foobooz]

8 Reasons This House Has Been on the Market Since 2011

This Moorestown, NJ, home has some good qualities, but it’s had trouble selling. We think we know why.

The Yellow Brick Road5853573_1We understand the temptation to invoke Southern Europe with those pale bricks (we think that’s what’s going on). But reminding people of that fateful trip to Oz may be less appealing.

Built-in FormicaformicaPoor formica. It was once so desirable. Now a house hunter spots some at an open house and runs screaming. There are several rooms in this house that appear to have built-in formica cabinetry, including a little bedroom, the master bath, and one of the bedrooms. It’s just a beleaguered material.

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Unusual Gray Gables Is Ready for Its Murder-Mystery Closeup

gray-gables-opener
This home, which the listing calls Gray Gables, is an interesting mix of two aesthetics: Murder, She Wrote, with traditional Americana/country kitchen design; and Hercule Poirot, with wood details that gleam with Pledge-like luster.

Either way, it is the perfect house for a murder mystery, or perhaps a real-life game of Clue. There are eight bedrooms (more than 5,000 square feet) so you figure seven guests come to stay the night — but the host is found dead, and the guests have to determine who’s to blame.

Possible locations for mysterious occurances: the pool; the cabana; the solarium; the conservatory; the butler’s pantry (with leather-studded countertops); the three-car garage; the wrap-around porch; or the grounds, which have a pear tree, a flowering cherry tree, grapes, holly trees, and much more — but the fruit trees are good for poisoning subplots.

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