Study: Why Your Bedtime Matters Just As Much As the Number of Hours You Sleep

Sure, setting a bedtime alarm might sound like an eye-roll-worthy suggestion. But a new study performed by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital shows that doing so could have some eye-roll-tempering impacts on your life. Think: better work performance and the ability to actually stick to your morning workout schedule — for once!

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Why People Who Do Everything Right Still Get Cancer, According to New Study

Yesterday, my friend and I were texting back and forth about how Grey’s Anatomy is our personal version of comfort food. I turn to the show whenever I am feeling down/bored/restless — literally whenever I am feeling anything aside from occupied.

I mention this because on that show, the heroes (those would be the surgeons, of course) manage to survive plane crashes and lion-in-the-city encounters and gunmen loose in the hospital, but one thing they are constantly stumped by — much like us, here in the real world — is cancer. And the question of, Why did this person get cancer? And now, a new study out of Johns Hopkins, published in the journal Science, places the spotlight on why even those who drink all the green juice in the world and get well over 10,000 steps a day in and wouldn’t touch a cigarette with a 10-foot pole can still be struck with news of the C-word.

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Temple Study: Men Ate 6,000 Calories a Day and Didn’t Get Out of Bed for a Week

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Nope, you didn’t read that headline wrong. For a new study out of Temple University, six male volunteers willingly (and, I’m assuming, happily) consumed 6,000 calories of pizza and burgers every day for one week without getting out of bed the entire time. The goal was to learn about the cause of diabetes by seeing what happens when otherwise healthy individuals consume 2.5 times more calories than they should without moving their bodies to burn it off.

Any guesses as to what happened?   Read more »

Which Matters More to Donor-Egg Recipients: Looks or IQ?

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Shutterstock

So you’re going shopping for a donor egg. What traits of the donor would be most important to you?

A new study in the Journal of Women’s Health reveals some fascinating changes in trends among those using donor eggs to become pregnant. The researchers, from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, studied which donor characteristics more than 400 would-become-moms at the Reproductive Medical Associates of New York fertility clinic said mattered most to them.

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Study: People Who Live Near Bike Lanes Exercise More

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Shutterstock

Looks like whole “If you build it, they will come” thing might actually be true when it comes to bike lanes and bike paths. A new study out of the UK and published in the American Journal of Public Health found that people who live near bike lanes get more exercise each week than people for whom such infrastructure isn’t as easily accessible.

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WHOA: Temple Researchers Edit HIV Out of Human Cells in Lab Study

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Shutterstock

Crazy cool news out of Temple University today, y’all: As per a just-published study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from Temple’s neuroscience department have figured out a way to edit human cells and “snip out” HIV DNA, essentially eliminating the virus from cells for good.

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Why America Is Obese: We’re Not Exercising Enough, Study Says

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Shutterstock

A new study by Stanford University School of Medicine suggests that America’s obesity epidemic might be more influenced by a lack of exercise than excess calorie consumption, the LA Times reports. The research shows that while obesity has risen in the past 22 years, the amount of time we spend exercising has taken a major dive.

In 2010, 52 percent of women and 43 percent of men reported doing no exercise in their free time, up from 19 percent and 11 percent in 1998. But here’s the kicker: The number of calories we consume has remained the same.

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Turmoil Over Testosterone Study Leaves Doctors, Patients Dangling

The news was enough to make a testosterone induced manly man shrivel.

It was late last year that JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, published the results of research that claimed that men who use testosterone supplementation have a 29 percent greater chance of dying from a heart attack or stroke within three years of use.

Until the study, testosterone was the hottest medical product on the market. You couldn’t listen to talk radio or watch a sporting event without being asked if you had “low-T” during the commercial break. That would explain why you were sitting on your couch instead of playing basketball, having sex and generally enjoying your life. The announcer then promised that a gel, a pill, or an injection would transform you from a disinterested lump of flesh into a man again.

Now those ads have been replaced new ones from law firms looking to sign up clients for class action lawsuits. Read more »

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