Which Matters More to Donor-Egg Recipients: Looks or IQ?

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Shutterstock

So you’re going shopping for a donor egg. What traits of the donor would be most important to you?

A new study in the Journal of Women’s Health reveals some fascinating changes in trends among those using donor eggs to become pregnant. The researchers, from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, studied which donor characteristics more than 400 would-become-moms at the Reproductive Medical Associates of New York fertility clinic said mattered most to them.

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Study: People Who Live Near Bike Lanes Exercise More

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Shutterstock

Looks like whole “If you build it, they will come” thing might actually be true when it comes to bike lanes and bike paths. A new study out of the UK and published in the American Journal of Public Health found that people who live near bike lanes get more exercise each week than people for whom such infrastructure isn’t as easily accessible.

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Why America Is Obese: We’re Not Exercising Enough, Study Says

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Shutterstock

A new study by Stanford University School of Medicine suggests that America’s obesity epidemic might be more influenced by a lack of exercise than excess calorie consumption, the LA Times reports. The research shows that while obesity has risen in the past 22 years, the amount of time we spend exercising has taken a major dive.

In 2010, 52 percent of women and 43 percent of men reported doing no exercise in their free time, up from 19 percent and 11 percent in 1998. But here’s the kicker: The number of calories we consume has remained the same.

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Turmoil Over Testosterone Study Leaves Doctors, Patients Dangling

The news was enough to make a testosterone induced manly man shrivel.

It was late last year that JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, published the results of research that claimed that men who use testosterone supplementation have a 29 percent greater chance of dying from a heart attack or stroke within three years of use.

Until the study, testosterone was the hottest medical product on the market. You couldn’t listen to talk radio or watch a sporting event without being asked if you had “low-T” during the commercial break. That would explain why you were sitting on your couch instead of playing basketball, having sex and generally enjoying your life. The announcer then promised that a gel, a pill, or an injection would transform you from a disinterested lump of flesh into a man again.

Now those ads have been replaced new ones from law firms looking to sign up clients for class action lawsuits. Read more »

Philadelphia FIGHT Participating in Major Clinical Trial to Find HIV Cure

philadelphia fight wistar hiv study

Local HIV service organization Philadelphia FIGHT has announced that it will participate in “the largest randomized trial anywhere” to find a cure for HIV. The project — led by West Philly biomedical research institute Wistar — is funded by a four-year, $6.2-million-dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health. The goal? To lead a clinical trial that aims to “drain the viral reservoir” of the HIV-1 virus in patients with HIV/AIDS.”

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Too Much Eye Contact: Maybe This Is Why the Government Shut Down!

Photograph by Jeff Fusco

Photograph by Jeff Fusco

So yesterday John Boehner and President Obama sat down for a face-to-face chat, and ABSOLUTELY NOTHING HAPPENED. Throughout the country, journalists lamented: How can this be? Isn’t a good old-fashioned tête-à-tête the best recipe for resolution in a standoff? Shouldn’t two reasonable men of wildly divergent opinions sitting eyeball to eyeball be able to work out a compromise?

Uh, no. The results of new research at Germany’s University of Freiburg show just the opposite, in startling contrast to the advice I’ve been giving my kids from the day they were born. (You know: Firm handshake, look the other person in the eye … ) Note to said kids: If you’re in search of compromise, look ’em in the mouth instead.

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