Philly Woman Sues Angie’s List, Calls Service “Fraudulent,” “Deceptive”

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The whole point of the popular website Angie’s List is that it is supposed to provide ratings and reviews of contractors, mechanics, dentists and the like based purely on customer experience, referring to itself in the company membership agreement as a “passive conduit.” But according to one Philadelphia woman, Angie’s List is anything but. Read more »

How Awesome Fest Devolved Into an Ugly Lawsuit — Putting Its Future in Doubt

Awesome Fest logo

Awesome Fest was created in 2010, per its website, to “showcase innovative and cutting edge independent cinema in unique and non-traditional spaces throughout the City of Philadelphia.” The past few summers, the festival has screened films and put on musical performances in spaces (primarily outdoors) in and around Philly. Last year, it hosted a wide variety of events: A Karate Kid screening and Q&A with Ralph Macchio, a concert by Macaulay Culkin’s Pizza Underground band, a Wizard of Oz/Dark Side of the Moon mashup at Clark Park and the Second Annual (Kevin) Bacon Festival. Some of these cost money, but all outdoor screenings were free. The festival even held an event in Chicago last year.

Now, the partnership behind Awesome Fest is in turmoil. Founder Josh Goldbloom sued partner Joanna Pang (who also owns the Trocadero) in February for alleged “misappropriation and mismanagement of Awesome Fest finances and for her secret usurpation of total control of the company and its assets” after she refused to give him Awesome Fest equipment — including a $25,000 projector, a $12,000 screen, $5,000 in audio equipment, and a van — that Goldbloom claims he intended to use to host events under the Awesome Fest banner.  Read more »

Hero Firefighter Sues NY Daily News for Use of Photo in Sex Scandal Article

In late January, many media outlets were busy reporting on the sex scandal surrounding the Philadelphia Fire Department, among them New York’s Daily News, which ran two articles about it on its website. The trouble is, according to a lawsuit filed in Philadelphia’s federal court, they chose to illustrate the stories with an Associated Press photo of heroic Philadelphia firefighter Francis Cheney II, whose name hasn’t been mentioned in connection with the scandal. Read more »

Montco-Based McNeil Pleads Guilty to Selling Contaminated Children’s Tylenol

Photo | Paulina Isaac

Photo | Paulina Isaac

On Tuesday, McNeil-PPC, the Fort Washington-based subsidiary of pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson pleaded guilty in a Philadelphia federal courtroom for its criminal role in contaminated Children’s Tylenol and Children’s Ibuprofen liquid medicines being sold to the public.

McNeill pleaded guilty to one count of “delivery for introduction into interstate commerce adulterated drugs,” a misdemeanor violation of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The company will pay a $20 million criminal fine and face a $5 million forfeiture. Read more »

Hall & Oates File Lawsuit Against Haulin’ Oats Granola

Hall & Oates v. Haulin' Oats

Hall & Oates photo used under a Creative Commons license. Granola photo via Early Bird Foods & Co.’s website.

Get out your best song title puns, Hall & Oates have filed a lawsuit.

“They won’t go for that,” the New York Post reports. “They can’t go for that,” the New York Daily News says. “A maneater, fine,” says AM New York. “A granola eater?” The Guardian dives into the Philadelphia duo’s early catalog with, “Where once they offered the world an Abandoned Luncheonette, Hall & Oates are now trying to close down the breakfast bar, too.”

Yes, Hall & Oates want a granola product to go Big Bam Boom. They’ve sued Brooklyn-based Early Bird Foods & Co., a maker of small-batch granola and other foods, over the company’s Haulin’ Oats granola. Read more »

Ex-Stripper: Delilah’s Paid Dancers Less Than Minimum Wage

Some allegations from the lawsuit filed against Delilah's Den last month.

Some allegations from the lawsuit filed against Delilah’s Den last month.

Melody Schofield began dancing at Delilah’s Den in 2007. While dancing there, she says she had to purchase particular outfits to wear on certain days: Lingerie on Wednesdays, black and gold for the Entertainer of the Year contest, red and green at Christmas. She also says she had to pay a house fee of $30 to $85 for the opportunity to dance on stage, and that she had to tip the DJ, the house mom and the makeup artists. If she didn’t work at certain special events — such as the Wing Bowl After Party — she claims, she would be fined up to $250.

All of these allegations were made by Schofield, who went by Coco at the club, in a class-action lawsuit filed against the Spring Garden Street strip club last month. It was first reported by the Inquirer this morning. Schofield is the lead plaintiff in a potential class-action lawsuit her lawyer says could have hundreds of potential claimants. The suit is seeking a class of all dancers who have worked at Delilah’s in the last three years and receive some of their income in tips.

A spokesman for Delilah’s told the Inquirer the “stage lease fee” is a strip club industry standard but declined to comment on the suit. Schofield left the club in November 2014. Read more »

Here’s Eric Lindros’ $250K Libel Suit Against Ex-Ref

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Philadelphia Flyers Eric Lindros advances the puck toward the Boston Bruins net during the first period of NHL play in Boston Tuesday, November 26, 1996.

In a column in the Huffington Post last July, former NHL referee Paul Stewart wrote of his run-ins with Eric Lindros. Now, Lindros is suing him for $250,000 — Canadian.

The defamation suit, filed in an Ontario court, alleges several stories in Stewart’s column about Lindros are false. The statement of claim says the stories, which did not paint Lindros in a positive light, would cause “reasonable and ordinary readers of the article [to] regard Lindros with contempt or ridicule.”

“He gives a lot of time to charity,” said Geoff Shaw, one of Lindros’ lawyers in the suit. “He donated $5 million to a hospital in Ontario, He raises money for Easter Seals. I know he does events in your neck of the woods as well. He says, ‘My reputation is important to me when I’m giving this time.'” Read more »

Bart Blatstein: I Never Made Threats About Pier Shops

Tower signage at the Pier Shops earlier this month (Photo: Dan McQuade)

Tower signage at the Pier Shops earlier this month (Photo | Dan McQuade)

Yesterday was supposed to be the big unveiling of Bart Blatstein’s plans for The Pier Shops at Caesars, the half-empty mall over the ocean in Atlantic City. But it was abruptly called off late last week after Caesars filed a lawsuit accusing Blatstein “of having taken over the Pier’s lease from [a] third company illegally and without Caesars’ consent.”

Blatstein responded in court Monday to accusations in that lawsuit from Caesars Atlantic City president Kevin Ortzman, which included: Read more »

Two Pennsylvania Wrestlers Sue WWE in Federal Court

You’ve probably heard by now about the lawsuit filed against the WWE by two former wrestlers, Evan Singleton and Vito Lograsso, both from Pennsylvania. The complaint they filed (below) is a fascinating, brutal piece of reading that alleges that many of the league’s wrestlers have suffered brain damage and even committed suicide because of the damage they’ve suffered during matches.

Wrestling may be “scripted” — that is, not quite real — but the pain wrestlers suffer, it seems, is authentic. Why? The lawsuit says this is what happens, essentially, when you get large men beating on each other, falling off of steel cages and whacking each other with metal chairs — even when it’s all in fun:

steroid

Though he’s not a part of the lawsuit, the plaintiffs’ attorneys rely heavily on the wrestler Mick Foley’s experiences in making their case. Why? Because he might be the closest thing to an intellectual the wrestling circuit has produced. He’s authored several books about his time in the ring — and gets credit for actually writing them instead of, like most jocks, having them ghost-written. He’s written for Slate and is generally known as funny and thoughtful.

Here are the lawsuit’s top references to Mick Foley (who is, incidentally, competing in this year’s Wing Bowl), as a summary of what the plaintiffs’ case is all about.
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Twice-Fired Philly Cop Sues Ramsey, City

John Hargraves was fired from his job as a Philadelphia police officer back in October 2012 after he was arrested and charged with aggravated assault following an altercation with his wife. But the 17-year veteran of the force was found not guilty on all charges in 2014, and now he has filed a federal lawsuit (below) against Commissioner Charles Ramsey and the city, saying that his civil rights were violated. Read more »

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