Two Pennsylvania Wrestlers Sue WWE in Federal Court

You’ve probably heard by now about the lawsuit filed against the WWE by two former wrestlers, Evan Singleton and Vito Lograsso, both from Pennsylvania. The complaint they filed (below) is a fascinating, brutal piece of reading that alleges that many of the league’s wrestlers have suffered brain damage and even committed suicide because of the damage they’ve suffered during matches.

Wrestling may be “scripted” — that is, not quite real — but the pain wrestlers suffer, it seems, is authentic. Why? The lawsuit says this is what happens, essentially, when you get large men beating on each other, falling off of steel cages and whacking each other with metal chairs — even when it’s all in fun:

steroid

Though he’s not a part of the lawsuit, the plaintiffs’ attorneys rely heavily on the wrestler Mick Foley’s experiences in making their case. Why? Because he might be the closest thing to an intellectual the wrestling circuit has produced. He’s authored several books about his time in the ring — and gets credit for actually writing them instead of, like most jocks, having them ghost-written. He’s written for Slate and is generally known as funny and thoughtful.

Here are the lawsuit’s top references to Mick Foley (who is, incidentally, competing in this year’s Wing Bowl), as a summary of what the plaintiffs’ case is all about.
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Twice-Fired Philly Cop Sues Ramsey, City

John Hargraves was fired from his job as a Philadelphia police officer back in October 2012 after he was arrested and charged with aggravated assault following an altercation with his wife. But the 17-year veteran of the force was found not guilty on all charges in 2014, and now he has filed a federal lawsuit (below) against Commissioner Charles Ramsey and the city, saying that his civil rights were violated. Read more »

Woman Born With One Arm Sues Great Adventure Over Roller Coaster Refusal

el-toro-great-adventure

Jacqueline Winner loves roller coasters, and she’s ridden dozens. But last June, when the Sicklerville, New Jersey, mother of four visited Six Flags Great Adventure as a chaperone on her daughter’s school trip, a Great Adventure employee told her to get off of the El Toro roller coaster. Why? Because Winner, 51, only has one arm. And now she’s suing. Read more »

Here’s the Lawsuit the NRA Just Filed Against Philadelphia

nra-suit

As promised, the National Rifle Association has filed suit against the City of Philadelphia for “for refusing to comply with a state law that prohibits local governments from enacting gun control ordinances,” according to a statement from the organization today.

The organization is filing suit against Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Lancaster under the provisions of House Bill 80, which was signed into law in Harrisburg last year and allows membership organizations to sue municipalities where gun regulations  are more restrictive than state law. “The cities of Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and Lancaster have openly defied state law for decades.  They continue to willfully violate the law and insist on politically grandstanding at taxpayers’ expense,” Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA’s Institute for Legislative said in the statement.

The suit has just posted in the Philadelphia court system. We present it below as a public service. Stay tuned for more.

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Five Below Sued for Securities Fraud

Photo by Ildar Sagdejev via Wikimedia Commons

Photo by Ildar Sagdejev via Wikimedia Commons

If you have kids, you no doubt are familiar with Five Below, the Philadelphia-headquartered chain of strip mall stores selling mostly toys and small household goods for $5 or less. Five Below was started in Wayne, Pennsylvania, in 2002 by Encore Books and Zany Brainy founder David Schlessinger and today boasts some 350 locations in 20 states. The company went public in 2012. And now Five Below and Schlessinger, among others, are named in a federal suit filed in Philadelphia alleging securities fraud. Read more »

Pennsylvania Sued Over Health Care Changes

Earlier this week, Community Legal Services filed suit against the state of Pennsylvania over changes to health care beginning next year.

Under the changes coming next year, Pennsylvania’s Medicaid program is being renamed from HealthChoices to Healthy Pennsylvania. Instead of expanding traditional Medicaid coverage as recommended in Obama’s health care law, Pennsylvania instead decided to expand on its own — accepting only some money from Medicaid.

All Pennsylvanians in Healthy PA are being moved into three tiers of coverage. In the suit — Mendez v. Mackereth — against the state’s Department of Public Welfare, CLS argues two of the three new health care options under Healthy PA “contain very significant, potentially health-altering cuts.”

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Parents Avoid Contempt Citation in Daughter’s Tuition Lawsuit

A judge yesterday refused to hold a 21-year-old’s parents in contempt, ruling the parents do not need to pay Caitlyn Ricci’s tuition while they appeal. In addition, the Appellate Division of New Jersey’s Superior Court will now take on the case.

Ricci sued her parents, who are separated, in February 2013. A judge ordered them to pay $16,000 of her daughter’s tuition at Temple in October. Ricci was seeking an injunction that would force her parents to pay it while they appealed or face fines or jail time.

Ricci has come under wide criticism since suing her parents, and the strain showed: “Her grandfather, Matthew Ricci, tried to shield his granddaughter, who has yet to respond to her critics,” Action News notes.

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D.A. Drops Forfeiture Cases That Drew National Attention

Christos Sourovelis and the house he'll get to keep.

Christos Sourovelis and the house his family will get to keep.

The district attorney’s office has ended its attempts to seize the homes of two Philadelphia families who had sued over the city’s aggressive civil forfeiture practices.

The Institute for Justice, which had sued on behalf of Christos Sourovelis and Doila Welch to shut down the program, announced Thursday that the D.A. had dropped its forfeiture cases against the two.

“We are pleased that Christos and Doila’s families will be able to enjoy their homes for the holidays,” said Darpana Sheth, an attorney with the institute, in a press release.

Philadelphia’s civil forfeiture practices came under scrutiny in late 2012, when City Paper’s Isaiah Thompson wrote that the program brought $6 million a year in assets to the city’s law enforcement community. He explained that the law is intended to seize the assets of drug dealers to prevent the property from being used in crime.

The problem? The government doesn’t actually have to prove the property was used in a crime. And in many cases, it was only tangentially related to an alleged crime.
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