When You Bite Into a Hamburger and Find a Human Tooth Inside

close-up of red lips eating junk food

Photo via iStock.com

It’s been nearly a year since we told you about a claim of gross stuff found in food in Philadelphia — the last time around, it was an allegation of a mouse head in a can of chick peas bought at a Philly grocery store — so we thought we’d bring you this things-that-make-you-say-ewwwwwwww tale of a human tooth allegedly found in a hamburger. Read more »

Former Inquirer Reporter Sues Starbucks Over Hot Tea

Left: Marilou Regan (Photo by HughE Dillon). Right: Starbucks tea cup. (Photo by Flickr user Patricia Bullack).

Left: Marilou Regan (Photo by HughE Dillon). Right: Starbucks tea cup. (Photo by Flickr user Patricia Bullack).

UPDATE: After this article was first published, Philadelphia magazine heard from Marilou Regan, who said she had not authorized the filing of the lawsuit and that she intends to have it withdrawn on Monday. Reached for comment, the lawyer who filed the lawsuit told us that Regan has a “very strong” case and that he would have no further comment until after discussing the matter with Regan on Monday.

ORIGINAL:

The McDonald’s hot coffee lawsuit is the stuff of legend and still has people scratching their heads more than 20 years after a jury ruled against the fast-food giant. And now a suburban Philadelphia woman — a former Inquirer reporter — has sued Starbucks because its hot tea was, yes, too hot. Read more »

Is Milton Hershey School to Blame for Abbie Bartels’ Suicide?

Abbie Bartels. (Photos via Twitter)

Abbie Bartels. (Photos via Twitter)

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with a statement from Milton Hershey School.

It has been three years since 14-year-old Pennsylvania girl Abbie Bartels died by suicide, and now her parents have filed a lawsuit against the prestigious Milton Hershey School in Hershey, Pennsylvania, accusing the boarding school of causing her death by expelling Bartels and barring her from eighth grade graduation after she expressed a desire to harm herself. Read more »

ACLU Sues City Over DNC Protest Permit Denial

The Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign and the ACLU announce their lawsuit against Philadelphia

From left: Elizabeth Ortiz, German Parobi, Cheri Honkla, Galen Tyler and Mary Catherine Roper. The ACLU and the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign gathered on Thursday morning to announce a lawsuit against the City.

The ACLU filed a lawsuit against the City of Philadelphia today over the denial of a protest march permit on the opening day of the Democratic National Convention. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign, founded in 1998 by Cheri Honkala.

“This city closes down streets for block parties, for Cinco de Mayo, for food festivals — including during rush hour — but they will not give the protesters permission to use the streets during rush hour,” ACLU of Pennsylvania Deputy Legal Director Mary Catherine Roper said.

At a press conference today in South Philadelphia, Roper and Honkala outlined their grievance: The city, they say, has forbidden protest marches in Center City between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. during this summer’s DNC. Honkala’s group wants to march down Broad Street from City Hall to the Wells Fargo Center at 3 p.m. on the opening day of the convention, July 25th.

“We’re the only folks so far that I know of that have been told we cannot march,” Honkala said. Read more »

Family of Amtrak Worker Killed in April Crash Files Suit

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Joseph Neal Carter Jr. (right) with his children. Carter was killed in an April Amtrak crash when a train struck the equipment he and another victim were using to perform work on the tracks.

On April 3, 2016, Amtrak train an struck and killed 40-year Amtrak veteran Joseph Neal Carter, Jr., who was working on the tracks. In a press conference this morning, attorneys Tom Kline from Kline & Specter, P.C. and Robert Mongeluzzi from Saltz, Mongeluzzi, Barrett & Bendesky, P.C. announced that they have filed a civil action in Philadelphia’s Common Pleas court on behalf of Carter’s family.

Train 89, which was traveling from New York to Savannah, Georgia, crashed in Chester when, at around 8 a.m., it ran into the backhoe that Carter was operating. A number of passengers were hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries. In addition to Carter, another worker, Peter John Adamovich, was killed. His family has obtained legal representation elsewhere, according to Kline.  Read more »

Forget the Mercer Cafe Lawsuit: It’s All Out War in the Tacconelli’s Pizza Family

Left: The neon sign at the original Tacconelli's Pizzeria in Philadelphia. (Photo via Flickr Creative Commons) Right: Vincent Tacconelli, who stands accused of fraudulently obtaining the trademark for the brand. (Photo via HughE Dillon)

Left: The neon sign at the original Tacconelli’s Pizzeria in Philadelphia. (Photo via Flickr Creative Commons) Right: Vincent Tacconelli, who stands accused of fraudulently obtaining the trademark for the brand. (Photo via HughE Dillon)

Not long ago, we told you about a bona fide family feud that had erupted between the folks behind the Tony Luke’s cheesesteak empire. Well, it seems that the world of iconic Philly pizzerias is not immune to such infighting. Read more »

Worker Who Fell Through Glass Floor at Rodin Museum Gets $7.25M Settlement

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This story has been updated with a statement from the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Phani Guthula had been inspecting light fixtures at the Rodin Museum on the Ben Franklin Parkway, on November 26, 2012, when the glass attic floor cracked, sending him on a 38-foot fall that nearly killed him, according to a statement from his lawyers this morning.  Read more »

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