Allentown Trans Woman Sues Former Employer Over Discriminatory Behavior

Kate Lynn Blatt

Kate Lynn Blatt

A transgender woman in Allentown has filed a federal lawsuit against her former employer, Tilden Township sporting goods store Cabela’s, saying that the company discriminated against her when she was transitioning, even going so far as to fire her because of her gender identity.

Kate Lynn Blatt’s lawsuit claims that management wouldn’t let her wear a gender-appropriate uniform, they forced her to wear a name tag with her birth name on it, and refused to let her use the women’s restroom.

“I mean it personally tore me down,” she says. “It never let up, they never stopped, and it prevented me from expressing who I was. … [My right to use the women's restroom was] refused and thrown in my face, even after I had provided all the documentation and proved my case.”

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School District Sued in Asthma Death

Philadelphia School District Building

The estate of the sixth-grade girl who died after suffering an asthma attack last fall at a Philadelphia school has brought a wrongful death lawsuit against the school district, the city, and the school, saying their policy decisions and in-the-moment negligence were responsible for her death.

Laporshia Massey died in September 2013, in the midst of a budget showdown between the state and the school district — no school nurse was on hand when her attack began during the day at Bryant Elementary School. Her family quickly suggested the death was due to a lack of a nurse at the school (an investigation said the father may have also played a role), and within weeks Gov. Tom Corbett signed over money due to the district. Corbett is not named in the suit. (See the full lawsuit below.)

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Dissed Doctor Sues Stephanie Stahl and CBS 3 for Libel

You know Stephanie Stahl. She’s the medical reporter and sometimes investigative reporter for CBS 3 in Philadelphia, the woman who mongers fear over the perils of buying prescription drugs without a doctor, the potential for an Ebola outbreak in Philadelphia, and doctors who allegedly implant cardiac stents into patients who don’t need them. Well, the last of those stories has her being hauled into Federal Court. Read more »

McCaffery’s Suit Survives First Inky Objections

Seamus McCaffery can proceed with his lawsuit against the Philadelphia Inquirer, a judge ruled this week.

McCaffery, a Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice, is suing — along with his wife — over a 2013 Inky regarding legal “referral” fees she collected. That story led to rules changes at the court, and an FBI investigation, but McCaffery said he did nothing wrong.

The paper’s lawyers this week argued that editors and journalists have the job “to highlight what public officials are doing and let the public make its own determination on the conduct.” McCaffery’s lawyer once again pointed out that then-publisher Bob Hall questioned the worthiness of the story after it was published.

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Lawyer: First Amendment Doesn’t Protect Inquirer

seamus mccaffery

The Inquirer may have the right to report on the actions of public officials, an attorney says in filings against the newspaper, but it doesn’t have the right to mislead readers into believing an official has done something wrong.

Dion Rassias, the attorney for Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffery and McCaffery’s wife, Lise Rapaport, made the argument this week in his latest filings against the newspaper over its 2013 story about referral fees Rapaport earned from law firms that later came before her husband on the bench.

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