Kurt Vile Announces New Album Title

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

The followup to Kurt Vile’s 2013 album, Wakin’ on a Pretty Dazewill be titled All Over the Place, according to an interview with the Philly indie rocker in Rolling Stone.

Living up to the album’s title, Vile has recorded songs everywhere from Brooklyn and Southern California to Georgia and, of course Philadelphia.

“I’ve developed this routine at home. I wait for the kids to go to bed, then my wife falls asleep. Then it’s dark and quiet enough for me to work on songs. I just keep going later and later, until sunrise,” he tells Rolling Stone. “I wanted to get back into the habit of writing a sad song on my couch, with nobody waiting on me. I really wanted it to sound like it’s on my couch — not in a lo-fi way, just more unguarded and vulnerable.”

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Philly’s Kurt Vile Playing Pitchfork Music Festival in July

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

The lineup for the 10th annual Pitchfork Music Festival was released today, and it includes Philly indie rocker Kurt Vile, who will perform on the second day.

The festival takes place this July at Union Park in Chicago. Besides Vile, the roster also includes Wilco, Sleater Kinney and Chance the Rapper, all of whom are  headlining a different night of the three-day event.

The festival takes place July 17-19. There are a limited number of three-day passes available for $150, and single days passes are $65. Buy them here. Full music lineup below:

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WATCH: Kurt Vile Performs With Warpaint in L.A.

Philly indie rock star Kurt Vile joined Warpaint on stage this weekend during the Red Bull Sound Select’s 30 Days in L.A. music festival. The group brought him out to perform the dreamy “Baby from their 2010 album The Fool. Vile will perform his own show at the 30 Days in L.A. on November 21st.

Check out the performance above, then read our Q&A with Vile from the Conversation Issue in the current Philly Mag.

(h/t Pitchfork)

WATCH THIS: Philly Band The War On Drugs Rocks Conan

Local band The War on Drugs was on last night’s episode of ConanThe indie-rock band, with members Adam Granduciel, David Hartley, Robbie Bennett and Charlie Hall, performed their song “Burning.” Co-founded by Philly’s Kurt Vile before departing for a solo career, The War on Drugs released their third studio album, Lost in the Dream, in March. Flavorwire has since called it one of the best albums of the year.

The band recently appeared in a photo diary for The New York Times T Magazine featuring Granduciel’s own snapshots. It turns out that, in addition to dating actress Krysten Ritter, the frontman is quite the photographer.

INTERVIEW: Kurt Vile On Creating Mojo In the Studio and How Being a Dad Influences His Career Path

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

The current issue of Philly Mag is filled to the brim with conversations from 50 of the city’s most intriguing movers and shakers—from politicians to gossip mongers to celebrity chefs. It goes without saying, then, that it wouldn’t be complete without a chat with Philly’s most-buzzed about musician, Kurt Vile.

Here are some snippets of our chat, where he shares secrets about his creative process and staying true to his indie roots while “doing whatever I can … to be more of a success career-wise and financially.” You can read the rest here.

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Kurt Vile on the Creative Process

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

Photograph by Jauhien Sasnou

PM: When does the process for creating a new album begin?

KURT: I’m always creating — at least writing. One thing ricochets off the other. There comes a time where you’ve accumulated a bunch of songs and it’s time to make a new record. Then you go out on the road and perform it. That music takes on a life of its own, because you play it differently every night.

PM: Sounds like you find most of your inspiration on the road.

KURT: Not necessarily. The stuff I write on the road is more universal. There are other times, like when I visit my parents — they live in the suburbs, but compared to where I live in Northern Liberties, it’s like the country. There, I can tap into playing acoustic or banjo in their backyard. Then there’s when I’m in the studio, coming close to a deadline. I feel like some of my best work comes out of that, when all of a sudden you can fill in any blanks, music-wise or lyric-wise, on the fly, because you have your mojo going. Read more »

7 Shows to See in Philly This Week: James Taylor, Neutral Milk Hotel, Beck and More



PHOTO: Kurt Vile Mural Restored

Mural Buffed

Last week — to the horror of city art fans — we reported that DJ Lee Mayjahs (aka “The Buffman”) took a paint roller brush to  Steve Powers‘s iconic Kurt Vile mural in Fishtown. After our reporting, Mayjahs reached out full of sympathies, and has since worked to restore the damage. According to Instagrammer @dasheikee, who posted this photo of the repaired mural, Mayjahs covered the mural with interior house paint, which “came completely off with a power wash.” 

Photo by Adjua Fisher.

The Kurt Vile mural, as seen this morning. Photo by Adjua Fisher.

Philadelphians Who Deserve Murals Instead of Kurt Vile

kurt-vile-mural-2

On Saturday, a Philadelphian decided to buff the Kurt Vile mural, causing shrieks of horror from hip Philadelphians and a Philadelphia public art meme.

People have said the reaction is overblown, but (1) it’s good when people discuss and debate public art and (2) of course it is. Literally everything on the Internet, even the most serious issues, can get overblown — there’s no sense complaining about it. But, sure, this isn’t the nose of the Old Man in the Mountain collapsing — the defacer has already apologized and even the artist says you should calm down. ESPO, aka Steve Powers, was similarly undisturbed about psychylustro covering up. “Nobody writing [graffiti] cares and any attempt to make it appear otherwise is click bait,” he told Hidden City (the Buzzfeed of Philadelphia Buildings, I guess) in May.

That is a point to take: Graffiti by its very nature is a transient art form, and murals come and go, too. David Guinn — who has more good murals in the city than anyone — once had four seasons in South Philadelphia. Now there are only three. The enormous Frank Sinatra mural is gone. Both were covered up by new residential construction, which is a better use of space than a mural. This one just disappeared in a more fantastic fashion. (And, obviously, the uproar was so great that it will be fixed up.)

But the mural got me thinking. I have passed the Kurt Vile mural several times where someone comments about how — while it’s cool — the mural is also an ad for his latest album. That’s weird, no? Did we paint a Boyz II Men album in the mid-’90s? (Not that they needed the increased sales.) A mural that’s also an ad is not exactly the end of the world: We have a mural for Jane Seymour’s jewelry line, after all, and a Vile album ad is certainly a better choice than that. But it got me thinking about other Philadelphians who deserve a mural, perhaps ones who aren’t selling anything. Time for some jokes mixed in with real suggestions!

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Connor Barwin’s Make the World Better Foundation’s Ralph Brooks Park Fundraiser

Connor-Barwin-Ralph-Brooks-Park-01-Ade-Fuqua-Richard-Negrin-City-of-Philadelphia-Jeffrey-Tubbs-Connor-Barwin-940x540

It was only a few weeks ago I was writing about Bud Selig’s visit to Philadelphia and his comments about the Phillies being the most philanthropic team in the MLB. The Philadelphia Eagles aren’t too shabby, either. There’s Brent Celek’s “Take Flight” Foundation for kids’ education, DeMeco Ryan’s Foundation supporting children’s healthy eating, and Todd Herremans Foundation, which raises money for various children’s charities in need.

Now Connor Barwin has started a foundation called the Make the World Better Foundation (MTWB is an acronym for his parents’ names: Margret Thomas and William Barwin). Friday night Barwin hosted a concert at Union Transfer to raise money for Ralph Brooks Park at 20th and Tasker Streets, a park in need of renovation that Barwin would pass on his bike rides to “work” from his Rittenhouse Square residence. Plans were already underway to revitalize the park; they just needed that extra push — including money to meet the goals set out by the organizations that were in place, including Urban Roots, the ACE Mentor Program, and the Philadelphia Water Department.

The major fundraiser to get them over the hurdle was held Friday night at Union Transfer where Connor Barwin hosted a VIP cocktail party were fans could meet their favorite players. Afterward there was a concert where Kurt Vile and the Violators, The Districts and The Tontons played to a sold-out crowd. The artists donated their services to the organization as did the music hall, along with all proceeds from the bar that evening. When the total is tallied, Connor Barwin is going to match it. In no time, the Ralph Brooks Park will be a safe place for kids to play again.

Connor Barwin’s Make The World Better Foundation’s Ralph Brooks Park Fundraiser »

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