Report: Court Could Remove Kane From Office

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane looks on before newly elected members of the Pennsylvania Legislature are sworn in, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. Republicans who control both the Senate and House picked up additional seats in the November election. In the House, Republicans outnumber Democrats 119 to 84 and in the Senate, 30 to 20. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane looks on before newly elected members of the Pennsylvania Legislature are sworn in, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Attorney General Kathleen Kane has vowed to stay in her job even if — as is expected — she is indicted on charges she leaked secret grand jury information. But a new report suggests that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court could choose to remove her from office if charges are filed.

TribLive’s Brad Bumsted reports: “A little-known emergency valve in rules governing attorney conduct would allow the state Supreme Court, upon request, to suspend the license of a lawyer suspected of ‘egregious conduct.’ That could remove Kane from office because the state constitution says the attorney general must be an attorney, said Ernie Preate, former attorney general from Kane’s hometown of Scranton.” Read more »

Kane: Won’t Resign if Charged

Kathleen Kane. AP | Bradley C. Bower

Kathleen Kane. AP | Bradley C. Bower

Attorney General Kathleen Kane said Tuesday she will not resign if criminal charges are brought against her over accusations she leaked secret grand jury testimony.

“For the past 13 months, I have been carrying on,” Kane said. “I will handle it and continue to do my job.” Read more »

Felony Policy Won’t Affect Kane

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane looks on before newly elected members of the Pennsylvania Legislature are sworn in, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. Republicans who control both the Senate and House picked up additional seats in the November election. In the House, Republicans outnumber Democrats 119 to 84 and in the Senate, 30 to 20. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane looks on before newly elected members of the Pennsylvania Legislature are sworn in, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. Republicans who control both the Senate and House picked up additional seats in the November election. In the House, Republicans outnumber Democrats 119 to 84 and in the Senate, 30 to 20. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Attorney General Kathleen Kane has a policy: Any employee of her office who faces felony charges will be suspended without pay.

The policy doesn’t apply to Kane herself, TribLive reports.

“The provision requiring suspension for accused felons ‘does not cover the attorney general, who is an elected official rather than an employee,’ her spokesman Chuck Ardo said Tuesday,” Brad Bumsted writes.  Read more »

Dollar Tree Completes Purchase of Family Dollar

 

(digitalreflections/Shutterstock)

(digitalreflections/Shutterstock)

A new settlement has paved the way for the approval of Dollar Tree‘s $9.2 billion acquisition of Family Dollar Inc.

Attorneys General in 17 states (including Pennsylvania) agreed to approve the sale as long as Dollar Tree sells 330 Family Dollar branches to a competing company. The states’ lawsuit alleged that the acquisition would have led to a substantial loss in competition, according to a statement from Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane. Read more »

Kane Fires Another Staffer

Kathleen Kane

George Moore told Kathleen Kane she should fire her controversial chief of staff. The chief of staff still has a job. Moore doesn’t.

Moore, a 16-year veteran of state government, was fired Wednesday from his job as Kane’s labor-relations coordinator. He told the Inquirer he believed he’d been terminated because he recommended the firing of Jonathan Duecker after two women reported Duecker had sexually harassed them. Read more »

Republican Jumps Into AG’s Race

State Sen. John Rafferty

The first official challenger to Attorney General Kathleen Kane has emerged.

State Senator John Rafferty is expected to announce his candidacy this week. The Republican has represented parts of Berks, Chester and Montgomery counties in Harrisburg since 2003. Read more »

Another Sting Target Pleads Guilty

Michelle Brownlee

Michelle Brownlee has become the latest Philadelphia Democrat to plead guilty to corruption charges arising from the investigation abandoned by Attorney General Kathleen Kane and revived by Philadelphia D.A. Seth Williams. Read more »

The Brief: “They Already Called the Election, But It Ain’t Over Till It’s Over.”

Photos by Jeff Fusco

Photos by Jeff Fusco

1. The mayoral candidates spent the final weekend of the campaign insisting the race isn’t over yet.

The gist: The reverberations of last week’s Jim-Kenney-could-beat-FDR poll were still strong on the final weekend of the campaign, with Kenney, Anthony Williams and Lynne Abraham all insisting during traditional last-minute stops at city churches on Sunday that the mayoral race won’t be over until 8 p.m. Tuesday night. At a stop of Greater St. Matthew Baptist Church in Nicetown, Williams was joined by U.S. Rep Chaka Fattah, who “decried the poll,” according to the Inquirer. Other speakers did as well: Read more »

The Rise and Fall of Kathleen Kane

Kathleen Kane and Frank Fina.  (Kane: Matt Rourke/Associated Press; Fina: Jason Minick/Associated Press)

Pennsylvania attorney general Kathleen Kane, left, and former state prosecutor Frank Fina. (Kane: Matt Rourke/Associated Press; Fina: Jason Minick/Associated Press)

Ruth Lenahan remembers the feeling she had when she sat down with her friend Kathleen Kane in a political operative’s office in downtown Scranton back in 2011. Kane had been a prosecutor for Lackawanna County for a dozen years, but left in ’07 to raise her two young sons. Now she was restless, and thinking of running for some office. The year before, in 2010, she’d promised to take on a corrupt state senator, Bob Mellow, but was pressured not to by her husband’s family, which owns a large trucking company — taking on Mellow meant risking the loss of a huge state liquor-hauling contract. So she backed out. But now there was a new office to run for, one that seemed to fit her: state attorney general, which, after governor, is the most important elected position in Pennsylvania. And Ruth Lenahan’s feeling about her friend was profound: She was awestruck. Read more »

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