Big Calls (And Non-Calls) Help Eagles Late

NFL: Arizona Cardinals at Philadelphia EaglesNick Foles had thrown his first interception of the season, and at a most inopportune time.

With just a few minutes left in the game and the Eagles nursing a three-point lead, Foles dropped back on 2nd-and-7 from the Eagles 34 and faced immediate pressure. He had a defender draped all over him but decided to try and force a throw to DeSean Jackson anyway. Bad choice. Patrick Peterson picked off the errant pass and had the Cardinals set up in Philadelphia territory for the possible go-ahead drive. But as the dust settled, sitting on the ground alongside all the fallen players was a yellow flag. Tyrann Mathieu had been caught holding Jason Avant, negating the play. Foles’ streak remained intact and, more importantly, the Eagles retained possession.

That was one of several critical plays down the stretch that hinged on a referee’s call (or non-call).

Arizona head Bruce Arians concluded his opening statement after the game by saying “refereeing did not determine us losing the football game. We didn’t make enough plays.” His players generally followed suit. But their body language in-game struck a much different tone.

“It went both ways,” said James Casey, who was also involved in one of the defining moments late in the contest. “We had a couple big calls go our way at the end of the game  but that’s the way it goes sometimes. A lot of times you’re on the other end.”

Let’s take a look at the key moments: Read more »

Eagles Wake-Up Call: Midterm Grades (Offense)

desean_400_102713With eight games in the books, here are position-by-position grades for the Eagles’ offense.

Quarterbacks: C

During this exercise, it’s important to remember that we’re handing out grades based on everything we’ve seen in the first half of the season. In other words, what you won’t see here is: The offense has stunk it up the last two weeks. Everybody gets an F!

I would say the Eagles got above average QB play against the Chargers, Giants and Bucs. They were OK against the Redskins and Broncos. And they were flat-out bad against Kansas City, Dallas and the Giants (the second game). The way I see it, that puts them at just about average.

Michael Vick has completed just 54.6 percent of his passes, but averaged 8.6 yards per attempt and was good as a runner before injuring his hamstring. Nick Foles played well in the second half against the Giants and again in Tampa, but delivered a clunker vs. the Cowboys. And Matt Barkley is about what you’d expect. Read more »

All-22: The Struggles Of Nick Foles

all22_mccoy1_102213

Anyone watching Sunday’s game could see that Nick Foles was off, to steal the term Chip Kelly used to describe his quarterback.

He overthrew receivers and undthrew receivers. Threw behind them in some instances and was too far out in front in others. Foles’ accuracy was quite possibly as bad as you’ll see from an NFL quarterback this year (11-for-29 for 80 yards overall).

But beyond the misses were the plays where Foles failed to see the entire field or simply hesitated to pull the trigger. Coming off a strong performance the week before against the Bucs, it’s difficult to come up with an explanation for why the second-year QB was so bad.
Read more »

Zone Read: Eagles-Cowboys, the Day After

avant_900_102013.jpg

Editor’s note: The Zone Read is a new weekly feature that will publish the day after every game some time before noon. It will feature dispatches from the locker room, thoughts on what went down, play breakdowns and more. If you have feedback or suggestions, e-mail Sheil at skapadia@phillymag.com.

***

Jason Peters’ locker at the Linc serves as a boundary of sorts.

The offensive players, beginning with Todd Herremans, are all to his left. On the other side of the green double doors that lead to the training room are the Eagles’ defensive players, starting with Brandon Graham.

For the most part, during the first six weeks of the season, Peters’ side of the locker room had done its part. The Eagles went into Sunday’s game ranked near the top in most offensive categories. But against the Cowboys, the results were ugly. On 14 offensive possessions, they turned it over three times, punted on nine occasions, made one field goal and missed another.

All in all, it was easily the worst performance on that side of the ball all season.

“It was tough, man. Very disappointed,” said Peters, whose body language reflected his words. “I know to come out here, we haven’t even won a game at home, this is disappointing for the fans and disappointing for the team. Just a bad deal all the way around.” Read more »

‘It Was Like A Horror Movie’

066A5484

A sequence late in the first half told the whole story.

Final minute of play. Third-and-1 from the Dallas 42. Nick Foles takes the snap, finds an open DeSean Jackson along the right side, and misfires. Jackson smacks his hands together in frustration before heading to the bench to steam.

Meanwhile, Chip Kelly decides to send Alex Henery out for a 60-yard field goal attempt, which predictably fails.

Poor quarterback play. Bad body language. Questionable decision-making. That about sums up the Eagles’ 17-3 loss to Dallas Sunday. Read more »

Game Review: Eagles Offense Vs. Bucs ‘D’

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Nick Foles (9) spikes the football after scoring on a four-yard touchdown run during the first quarter of an NFL football game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

Here’s a position-by-position look at what we saw from the Eagles’ offense after having re-watched Sunday’s game.

QUARTERBACK

* Nick Foles’ numbers speak for themselves: 22-for-31 (71 percent) for 296 yards (9.5 YPA), three touchdowns and no interceptions. Foles also ran in for a score. This was different than last week’s game. He was going up against a Bucs defense that has some talent, specifically in the secondary. We spent much of the offseason discussing how the offense fits Michael Vick’s skill set. But so far (small sample size, granted), it looks like it fits Foles as well. As a rookie, he completed 60.8 percent of his passes and averaged 6.4 YPA. On 61 passes the past two weeks, those numbers are 67.2 percent and 8.9 YPA. Read more »

« Older Posts  |  Newer Posts »