Splendiferous Interiors: Historic Homes in the Great Northwest

Photo by Laura Kicey.

Photo by Laura Kicey.

We all already know that Chestnut Hill, Mt. Airy and Germantown are literally chockablock full of beautiful homes. But we are usually left to imagine the exact details of the fireplaces and mantles and hardwood flooring. Until they are opened to the public for a historic homes tour, which they were just a few weeks ago by Historic Germantown.

Photographer Laura Kicey toured five homes, which offer an embarrassment of interior riches. First in the gallery below is a Queen Anne-style home listed on the National Register of Historic Places and originally inhabited by a Civil War veteran who won the Congressional Medal of Honor. The kitchen is an absolute showstopper. Home two in Chestnut Hill is a Colonial Revival built in 1885. Past owners include a litany of famous Philadelphia names, which – glorious though they may be – all pale in comparison to the heavenly solarium.
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In the Round: Hazelhurst & Huckel’s West Price Street Curves

germantown historic home

West Price Street home designed by Hazelhurst and Huckel in 1890. Photo: Laura Kicey.

According to the American Architects and Buildings database, the architects of this home, Edward P. Hazlehurst, a Frank Furness colleague, and Samuel Huckel Jr., opened an architecture firm in 1881. Together they went on to design a number of notable buildings in this area: Rosemont College’s Sinnott residence; the Church of the Messiah at Broad and Montgomery; the Manufacturers Club at Broad and Walnut; and several buildings commissioned by the city.

The two men parted ways in 1900, when Huckel, alone, got an offer he couldn’t refuse: to remodel Grand Central Station. The database biography says, “Although Huckel would soon return to Philadelphia, the partners did not reconstitute their office; and Huckel went on to establish a new partnership with church architect Frank R. Watson (Watson & Huckel) while Hazlehurst worked independently.”

Hmm. Bad blood there? Jealousy?

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