The Checkup: This Goal-Setting Tweak Could Be Your Ticket to Lasting Weight Loss

• I think it’s safe to say that now, at the beginning of March, a good chunk of us have traded our New Year’s resolutions of weight loss or money-saving or whatever in for, well, happy hours complete with nachos. If your hand is raised, take note of the goal-setting strategy called design thinking: It forces you to dig deeper to identify the root reason for why you’re setting a goal, whether that’s weight-loss related or not, so that you actually — really! — stick with it. [Shape]

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One Simple Rule Science Says Will Help You Reach Your Weight-Loss Goals

This key is avoiding temptation | DustyPixel/iStock.com

This key is avoiding temptation | DustyPixel/iStock.com

I rant about needing to save more money a lot. Like, so often that the minute my friends hear the sound “muh“ start to come out of my mouth, I can see their eyes roll into the backs of their skulls as they devise an escape plan. I don’t blame them: Anything is better than talking about someone else’s budget. Especially when said person is talking about their diminishing bank account while clutching a $7 bottle of kombucha in one hand and picking at pieces of outrageously expensive granola with the other.

And this is pretty much what I am doing at all times. Shameless, I know.

See, my (and my bank account’s) problem is that I can’t not buy the $7 kombucha if I pass it in Whole Foods. “Treat yo’self,” I tell myself … every single week. Do you know what $7 times four is? I mean, of course you do, but I’ll tell you anyway: That’s nearly $30 a month spent on KOMBUCHA. And that’s if I only buy one per week which never actually happens.

So, how do I reach my goal of actually putting more money into savings? Well, as Science of Us reports, a new study to be published in Social Psychological and Personality Study suggests that I should just avoid Whole Foods — and anywhere else that slings overpriced kombucha and the other artisanal health food products that eat away at my funds — altogether. (Insert all the bawling emojis here.)

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These Four Letters Could Help You Keep Your New Year’s Resolution

letters

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If you’re anything like me, in the past 24 hours you’ve made declarative statements like, “I’m never eating white flour again!” or “Today will be the day I stop watching so many Law & Order: SVU marathons!” Then you’ve promptly broken said vows with a bowl of cheese-stuffed ravioli in one hand and a remote control in the other—rinse, repeat.

The phrase “talk is cheap” comes to mind here, but next time I set my lofty goals, I might just be able to keep my word, thanks to this nifty trick: The folks over on Science of Us have clued us in to a four-step technique that research has shown helps people to actually achieve what they set out to do. Like, for instance, it helped people who wanted to eat more fruits and vegetables actually eat more fruits and vegetables—instead of, you know, just saying, “I’m going to eat more vegetables!” and eating pasta instead. Impressive.

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Poll: Will You Make a New Year’s Resolution?

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Believe it or not, we’re less than a month out from the new year. Am I the only one who feels like 2013 went by like THAT?! Seriously, time seems to fly faster and faster the older I get.

It’s always about this time of year, with visions of holiday trees and lights and gifts playing in my head, that I start to think about what I hope to accomplish in the coming year. I’ve always hated the word “resolution” so I prefer to think of it as an exercise in goal setting. Problem is, most of them don’t usually, er, stick.

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