“Newbold” or Just “South Philly”? How Race Shapes Our Definition of Neighborhoods

St. Alban's Street | Google maps.

Is this Graduate Hospital? Southwest Center City? South Philly?  | Google maps.

Back in 2013, this magazine named the community southwest of Center City the “hottest neighborhood” in Philly. We called it Graduate Hospital—rather than Southcentral or South Philly, the monikers frequently used by longtime residents. It’s a common phenomenon. Newbies bark names like University City, Midtown Village and Newbold; old heads still use West Philadelphia, Gayborhood, and Point Breeze. And it’s not just neighborhood names that are fluid. So too are neighborhood boundaries, aside from obvious cutoffs (i.e. bridges, rivers, highways).

Now there’s a fascinating new study out of Harvard University that suggests the biggest driver of our wildly different perceptions about neighborhood identity is race.

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SEPTA Key: Will Students Ride For “Free”?

Septa regional rail train

SEPTA Key—the transit agency’s next-gen fare payment system—is still in its pilot stage, two years after the transition away from tokens and cash was supposed to begin. Now, all SEPTA is saying is that it’s rollout is “expected” in 2015. Let’s hope we have electronic fares before the Pope.

But the long delays haven’t deterred speculation about the program. Over at Sic Transit Philadelphia, there’s a thought-provoking post about the looming changeover from tokens to plastic cards (or in self-explanatory jargon, the “New Payment Technology”). And the story brings good news. Michael Noda reports that SEPTA officials are open to granting more reduced fares within the new system, including to groups like university students, who might be able to ride on the cheap using their student IDs. Read more »

Insane Surge in Philadelphia Gentrification

renewbold

Rendering of the new Point Breeze development reNewbold.| Rendering credit: LPMG Companies.

[Update: Corrected to show that San Diego’s gentrification rate slightly outpaces Philadelphia’s.]

If you listen to enough old codgers complain about the rise of gentrification in our city, you’d think the names Templetown and Ori Feibush are two of the four horsemen of the Apocalypse. We know that gentrification is a real phenomenon in Philadelphia and other cities, and that people are perturbed by it. But it’s also been a force for decades. The salient question is: how much has the rate of Philadelphia gentrification actually increased?

Well, a new quantitative analysis by Governing magazine attempts to measure the recent uptick. The study looked at low income census tracts in the nation’s 50 biggest cities since 1990, and found that, nationwide, the pace of gentrification of low income urban neighborhoods has more than doubled.

But here’s the real news. Over the same period, the pace of gentrification in Philadelphia’s low income census tracts increased by a staggering factor of 1,800 percent. That’s correct. According to this study, Philly’s gentrification rate is 18 times what it was in the 1990s. Just one city tops Philly’s rate: San Diego (with a 2,015 percent increase).  Read more »

Zillow Confirms That Starbucks Fuels Your Morning–and Gentrification

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Have you had your coffee this morning? If not, here’s a bit of information from a recent study conducted by Zillow that will certainly open your eyes:

A home that is now near a Starbucks would have sold, on average, for $137,000. A home that is not near a Starbucks would have sold, on average, for $102,000.

 Fast-forward 17 years to 2014. That average American home has now appreciated 65%, to $168,000. But the Starbucks-adjacent property has far outpaced that, appreciating 96% to $269,000.
That’s quite remarkable, but is it really just Starbucks or is it simply something Zillow calls the “coffee shop effect”? The report also compared the home values adjacent to both Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts within the first five years of the store opening.

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Morning Headlines: Gentrification and How Cities Try to Help Displaced Residents

With gentrification in Philadelphia becoming a hot topic last month thanks to seven series pull-out section in the Daily News (as well as a recent Onion article on the subject that didn’t really feel like satire), it seems fitting that we should at least take a look at what other cities are doing to deal with gentrification’s drawbacks.

This morning, Sandy Smith offered up a taste of what three cities (and the entire state of Missouri) are doing to help low to middle-income residents who are at risk for being displaced as a result of rising home values, which, Smith writes, aside from displacing long-time residents who can no longer afford to live in a neighborhood with increasing rents, cities experiencing gentrification often have perpetually blighted neighborhoods that could otherwise be put to good use.

Smith includes Philadelphia’s PHL Tax Loop program among the examples, which you can read on Next City.

How Cities and States Are Fighting Gentrification’s Displacement Factor [Next City]

In other news…

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The Onion Covers West Philadelphia Gentrification

From The Onion:

Despite modest increases in the west Philadelphia neighborhood’s property values over the past several years, residents of Walnut Hill told reporters Monday that the proprietors of Fireside Connections have definitely jumped the gentrification gun with their recently opened custom fireplace shop. …

“I guess these guys just looked around, saw a home brewery supply store and one boutique baby clothing shop, and thought this was the next step. But if you ask me, they really put the cart before the horse on this one. For crying out loud, we don’t even have a fresh pasta store yet.”

For the full article (the last line is the best):

Custom Fireplace Store Totally Jumps Gentrification Gun [The Onion]

Gentrification in Philadelphia

daily news special section

The DN’s special section appears in today’s print edition as well as online.

For those who think daily newspapers lack a purpose in a digitized world that threatens to make traditional media outlets obsolete, today’s coverage of gentrification in a Daily News special section is a firm rejoinder. The seven articles that comprise “The Problems and the Promise: Gentrification in Philadelphia” is a pull-out section of the print edition and a microsite at philly.com. It illuminates the issues around the word that’s probably the most contested and least understood of any used to refer to real estate and development battles in the city.

The project isn’t perfect. There are missteps — like the boldfaced use of the term “Templetown.” But there are important myths that get debunked, and crucial facts that must be called to every Philadelphian’s attention before they expound on gentrification. Because, oh boy, do people expound. I hear far too much strident talk about “gentrification” from people ill-equipped to understand it. This series should help.

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Can Philly Afford its Fight Against Gentrification?

Photo | Laura Kicey

Photo | Laura Kicey

One of the cruel things about gentrification is that it can be like wanting someone who doesn’t want you back. Those who face the impact of gentrification have an unrequited love with a neighborhood that changes right before their eyes, only to do tell them that things are different now.

It’s not you, it’s me.

The building uncertainty, insecurity, change and devastation involved in gentrification is like a real estate break up that leaves former partners, who once grew together, standing on opposite sides as the other moves on to become a bigger, better (and probably greener) pasture.

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