Mets Eat Ridiculous Amount of Cheesesteaks in Philadelphia

In what is surely a plot by the Phillies to fatten up other teams so they’ll be easier to beat, there is a leaderboard in the visitors’ clubhouse. It tracks how many cheesesteaks teams and players have eaten. The steaks fillings and toppings and rolls are free — and since it’s Philadelphia, the steaks are probably pretty authentic (i.e., good).

According to the Newark Star-Ledger’s Mike Vorkunov, the Mets ate 103 cheesesteaks during an April game. It shattered the previous team record of somewhere in the 80s.

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7 Guilt-Free Salad Recipes Inspired by Guilty Pleasure Foods

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Shutterstock

Trust me, I get it. You try to eat healthy, but sometimes those cravings just hit you and the only thing you can think about is getting your hands on a slice of pizza (or two, or three). These guilt-free salads, inspired by our favorite guilty pleasure foods, will combat those cravings while keeping you on track. Your tastebuds and your waistline will thank you.

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PHOTOS: Philly Gays Get a Taste of Flavors of the Avenue

This weekend East Passyunk Avenue hosted its annual Flavors of the Avenue festival, an all-day taste fest featuring restaurants up and down the South Philly enclave. HughE Dillon was there to take photos, so I asked him to snap some of the LGBTers for G Philly. You can check them out in the slideshow below.



PHOTOS: Flavors of the Avenue

HughE Dillon and the East Passyunk Avenue Business Improvement District share photos from this year’s Flavors of the Avenue event, where restaurants up and down East Passyunk Avenue brought their goods out into the streets to give folks a try. Among the 28 eateries participating were upscale joints, like Noord, Le Viet and Will, and sweet spots, like Ms Goody Cupcake. Check out shots of the crowd enjoying food — and ample sunshine — below.



Why You Should Dine Out for Life: Jim King

Our annual series, “Dine Out for My Life,” features a different local who has been affected by HIV/AIDS. It’s been leading up to tonight’s Dining Out for Life (DOFL) event throughout the Philly region. .

JimMy name is … Jim King

What is your Philly connection?
I grew up in Wilmington, Del., and lived there until my late-’20s . I lived in Delaware County for about 25 years, and then two years ago I finally moved to 19th and Christian streets. I always wanted to live in Philly so I’m glad I made the move.

What do you do for work?
I worked as a union electrician in Delaware, but retired in 2009.

How has HIV/AIDS affected your life?
In a few ways: In the early-’80s I was using drugs intravenously and having lots of anonymous sex when I first heard of HIV/AIDS. I tried to educate myself on the virus and get the facts and not the myths. Over the years I lost some friends and family to HIV/AIDS. 

The biggest thing I have learned from my experience with HIV/AIDS is …
There are a lot of people who really care about people living with HIV/AIDS.

Any Dining Out for Life restaurant recommendations?
I personally will be at Frankford  Hall the night of DOFL.

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Why You Should Dine Out for Life: Alayna Sands

ActionAIDS Dining Out for Life ambassadors open up about how HIV/AIDS has affected their lives, and why you should dine out for life on April 24th. Today: Alayna Sands. 

Screen Shot 2014-04-20 at 4.51.26 PMMy name is … Alayna Sands

What’s your Philly connection?
I grew up in Tucson, Ariz.; however both my parents are from Philadelphia. I moved to Philly about seven years ago, after attending school in Pittsburgh, and it has been home ever since.

What do you do for work?
I work in Human Resources.

The biggest thing I have learned from my experience with HIV/AIDS is …
It has motivated me to be compassionate. You may have HIV/AIDS and consequently endure some additional struggles. Yet you can still choose to live your life with dignity — and there are supportive communities out there who will help you.

Any Dining Out for Life restaurant recommendations?
The Gold Standard. They have good food and a great staff that will take care of you. There’s also Garces Trading Company. I love everything about that place.

In three words, describe the perfect dining out experience …
Family, friends, food!

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Why You Should Dine Out for Life: Ja Mai

Our annual series, “Dine Out for My Life,” features a different local who has been affected by HIV/AIDS every day between now and Dining Out for Life (DOFL), on April 24th.

JaMy name is … Ja Mai

What’s your Philly connection?
I am originally from Burma. I am from an ethnic group called Kachin. Philly area has a sizable community of Burmese ethnic minorities who came here mainly as refugees. I came here for college about 10 years ago. I have been living here ever since. I love this area. We have some wonderful people and places here.

What do you do for work?
I am a therapist working with children and their families.

How has HIV/AIDS affected your life?
Through my previous job as a medical case manager and volunteering in my community, I have come across many people from different backgrounds who are affected by it. Some of them are my own friends.

The biggest thing I have learned from my experience with HIV/AIDS is …
Instead of putting our efforts on questioning why one might be affected by HIV, we should put our efforts on how we can fight against it. Misinformation or lack of information continues to be a problem in our community. Discrimination for those living with HIV/AIDS continues to exist in our community. We should put our energy on learning accurate information about the virus, and how we can support each other in our fight against it. The HIV virus doesn’t discriminate anybody. Why should we?

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Why You Should Dine Out for Life: Garrod McFadden

Mr. Garrod McFadden is helping kick off our annual series, “Dine Out for My Life,” which features a different local who has been affected by HIV/AIDS every day between now and Dining Out for Life (DOFL), on April 24th.

GarrodMy name is … Garrod McFadden

What’s your Philly connection?
I have lived here for seven years. I grew up in Rochester N.Y., went to undergrad at SUNY Cortland in Cortland N.Y., and decided that Philadelphia was the place I wanted to pursue my Masters in social work, and continue a prominent career in this field

What do you do for work? 
I work at Hahnemann University Hospital as a social worker primarily providing essential discharging planning services for critical intensive cardiac patients, and post-surgical cardiac patients.

How has HIV/AIDS affected your life?
In a positive way. I graduated from SUNY and started working with HIV+ infants and children under the age 10 years old as a child case manager in Rochester N.Y. for over 10 years ago. Seeing the progress and delight on the faces of the parents and children over the positive change in their lives overtime propelled me to move forward in becoming a community advocate. Because of this experience, I am still a community advocate and have worked for HIV/AIDS organizations such as ActionAIDS in the past.

The biggest thing I have learned from my experience with HIV/AIDS is …
How impactful one’s life is with living with this disease. I have learned that it is so important to teach acceptance, because HIV+ people are human beings, too, and the impact of this disease on “everyone’s” lives is no different from any other disease.

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