Market Report: What Happens When You Buy Super-Cheap Jeans

Jeans

Why it’s worth spending more on these. | Shutterstock.

  • Shelling out more money for a pair of jeans is actually worth it. Not only does ultra-cheap denim (I’m talking pairs in the $20 to $50 range) tear more easily and gets saggy in the knees, but the synthetic dyes from factories are poured directly into rivers, workers aren’t paid living wages, and buttons and rivets might be toxic. Scary stuff. [Refinery29]
  • Pretty soon, you’ll be able to shop on Facebook. The social networking giant is creating mini e-shopping sites within Facebook pages in an attempt to nab a piece of the massive e-commerce revenue pie (which is projected to be around $350 billion this year). The project is still in the testing phase. [Buzzfeed]
  • Ease back into the workweek grind with some online shopping. Your first stop should be Nordstrom’s mega anniversary sale, which is in full swing right now. Here are some of the best buys. [InStyle]

Next: The secret to walking confidently in high heels.

Philadelphia Museum of Art’s Doctored Rainbow Picture Causes Big Confusion

The doctored rainbow picture from the Museum's Facebook page.

The doctored rainbow picture from the Museum’s Facebook page.

Let’s get this out of the way: It’s fake.

The original Facebook status, top, and the edited status, below.

The original Facebook status, top, and the edited status, below.

The picture of rainbow banners draped from the Philadelphia Museum of Art to celebrate the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision is a doctored image, a Photoshop gone wrong that confused and downright infuriated a good number of the Museum’s Facebook followers who thought the picture was real.

Sure, the Museum admitted that the image was “a digital render and a symbol of our support,” but that was hours after the initial picture was posted with the following caption:

“The Museum is flying rainbow banners in celebration of the Supreme Court’s decision on same sex marriage. ‘Like’ if you support #MarriageEquality for everyone!”

Read more »

BizFeed: Bank Plans Philly Layoffs; Google, Facebook Test Payment Systems

VGstockstudio/Shutterstock

VGstockstudio/Shutterstock

1. Big Bank Plans Philly Layoffs

The News: Wells Fargo is laying off 89 people in Philadelphia in July. The layoffs affect the bank’s legal order processing unit at its Independence Mall office in Old City. They respond to legal requests from third parties like the IRS, federal state agencies and law firms seeking customer bank records.

The layoffs were announced Thursday in a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act notice filed with the state of Pennsylvania. Workers were notified in November. Read more »

Crayola Apologizes for “Offensive Posts” After Facebook Hack

Pennsylvania-based art supply company Crayola is likely reviewing its social media security policies on Monday after a weekend hack left its official Facebook page flooded with status updates not exactly appropriate for the Sesame Street set.

By Sunday night, Crayola had deleted the posts and regained control of its Facebook page.

Some of the posts were decidedly NSFW. Below, a sampling of the more PG-13 offerings:

Read more »

CB West Counselor Won’t Be Charged for Facebook Post

While saying her posts to Facebook were inappropriate and ill advised,” Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman said today Marykate Blankenburg would not be charged for posts about the die-in protest at the Eagles game.

Read more »

Facebook and “Friends” in the Wake of Ferguson

protest-facebook-940x540

Scene from last Wednesday’s protest march (top); detail from a controversial post on the Facebook page of a Central Bucks West guidance counselor.

As a 29-year-old woman, this is how my Facebook feed tends to look: baby picture, wedding picture, baby-at-a-wedding picture, Supernatural spoiler (that last one might be my own contribution).

But over the past couple weeks, I’ve noticed an even less appealing trend: racist rant, thinly veiled racist rant, confusing meme that I suspect is a racist rant.

To clarify, I’m from the Northeast.

This is not, necessarily, to say that my hometown is any more backward than your own hometown. (Unless you’re from Amherst — you guys are pretty squeaky clean.) There’s an ugly, dumb contingent in every group of humans, and most of the time, I love that place. But post-Ferguson, I find myself rethinking my Internet relationship to the (Often, But Not Always) Great Northeast.

Read more »

Facebook Trying to Civilize Young People; Young People Resist

shutterstock_198858827-FACEBOOK-DISLIKE

It’s no surprise to anyone who’s ever had one that kids are mean. Really mean. Unspeakably mean. They’re enormously invested in social status, and the way to attain it, as far as they can see (they’re short), is to tear others down. For many eons, young people were only able to do this to those in their immediate vicinity, but now the miracle of technology allows them to stomp all over the feelings of young people around the world and drive them to suicide. (You can read about some particularly egregious examples here, if that’s how you like to spend your spare time.) This is why bullying, and cyberbullying in particular, have become such hot topics. According to Pew Research, 65 percent of those between the ages of 18 and 29 say they’ve been cyberbullied, and 92 percent have seen it done to somebody else.

Now Facebook is attempting to address the problem, at least on its pages, by teaching its users to empathize with others. A recent story in the New York Times discussed the work of Arturo Bejar, director of engineering for Facebook’s Protect and Care Team, which is exploring ways that Facebook users might let others know when their feelings are hurt by a post. Read more »

Rutgers Fans Wear “Ped State” T-Shirts to Penn State Football Game

ped-state-penn-state-rutgers-photo

Someone in the Rutgers University social media department is probably getting a good talking-to this morning. Over the weekend, on the occasion of the Penn State vs. Rutgers football game, the official Rutgers Football Facebook page ran photos of Rutgers fans wearing “Ped State” t-shirts, mocking the school for the Jerry Sandusky scandal. Read more »

Local Trans Man’s Identity Stolen In Prosthetic Penis Scam

scam

When Philadelphia artist Jaden Remy joined the private Facebook group “All Transmen Know Each Other,” he expected to find support and allies in the 1,000-plus members. He never expected that his identity and pictures would be stolen in an elaborate scam to sell prosthetic penises to other transgender men in the online group.

“This isn’t the first time this has happened,” says Remy; younger, oftentimes naive, members of trans community are often targeted for these types of scams. In this case, two fake Facebook users, “Jessie Sexton” and “Skylar Jace Collins,” used Remy’s pictures in an attempt to sell discounted FreeToM Prosthetics, a penis prosthetic, to unsuspecting trans men in the group.

The scammers posted a status update, posing as Remy, that included photos of the prosthetic penis in question. (You can see that NSFW image here.) The update read, “It’s going to change the world. This is an amazing product every trans man needs to own. Message me for details.”

Read more »

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