Former Police Detective Ron Dove Indicted in Murder Case

Ronald Dove and Erica Sanchez

Ronald Dove and Erica Sanchez

Ronald Dove, a former detective with the Philadelphia Police Department, has been indicted on charges that he allegedly helped his girlfriend evade investigators who suspected her in a homicide.

Dove, a 16-year veteran of the force, was fired in November 2013. The indictment was announced today by District Attorney Seth Williams.

“Police personnel have the responsibility to uphold the law, protect the rights of all people and to do so with the highest level of integrity, and Ron Dove failed to maintain that oath,” Commissioner Charles Ramsey said in a statement. “He has caused embarrassment to this city, this department and his family because of his shameful actions. Dove’s conduct is simply intolerable and inexcusable.”
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Gosnell Co-Defendant Gets New Trial

Eileen O’Neill, who was a co-defendant to Kermit Gosnell when he stood trial for killing three infants born alive at his West Philadelphia abortion clinic, has been granted a new trial.

Though O’Neill was tried with Gosnell, she was convicted on theft and conspiracy charges related to her work with and billing of patients at the clinic. She was not implicated in the deaths that sent Gosnell to prison for three life sentences.

“Prosecutors said O’Neill pretended to be a licensed physician at Dr. Gosnell’s West Philadelphia clinic, the Women’s Medical Society, when in fact she was unlicensed. She did, however, have a medical degree,” NBC 10 said at the time of her conviction. “The Commonwealth also argued O’Neill lied to insurance companies and patients and billed for services she was not allowed to perform. Her attorney argued there was no evidence O’Neill charged for her services.”
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Docs: Grand Jury Recommended Charges Against Kane

Documents released today by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court confirm that a grand jury has recommended charges be brought against Attorney General Kathleen Kane for the leak of information from an earlier grand jury.

The documents were unsealed as part of a broader court battle involving Kane, who is challenging the authority of the special prosecutor who led the grand jury, as well as the judge who appointed the prosecutor.

“Kane’s defense team argued a Montgomery County judge had no authority to appoint a special prosecutor to run a grand jury under state law and the state constitution’s separation of powers clause prohibits the court from investigating a member of the executive branch, Kane,” The Morning Call reports. “The Supreme Court on Tuesday denied the motion to quash the grand jury and unsealed the records as requested by Kane’s defense lawyers.”
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Jury Now Considering Tollefson Charges

A jury now has Don Tollefson’s fate in its hands. Final arguments in the former sportscaster’s trial were heard Tuesday, and the jury began deliberations that resume today.

“After five hours of deliberation, a jury could not decide the fate of Don Tollefson,” NBC 10 reports. Closing arguments finished Tuesday in the trial of the disgraced former Philadelphia sportscaster. By 9:30 p.m., a judge ordered the jury to go home after they were unable to come up with a verdict. They will return Wednesday morning.”
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Six Burning Questions About Grand Jury Leaks

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane looks on before newly elected members of the Pennsylvania Legislature are sworn in, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. Republicans who control both the Senate and House picked up additional seats in the November election. In the House, Republicans outnumber Democrats 119 to 84 and in the Senate, 30 to 20. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane looks on before newly elected members of the Pennsylvania Legislature are sworn in, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. Republicans who control both the Senate and House picked up additional seats in the November election. In the House, Republicans outnumber Democrats 119 to 84 and in the Senate, 30 to 20. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

The scepter still hangs over Kathleen Kane’s head.

It’s been a couple of weeks now since the Inquirer reported that a grand jury recommended the Pennsylvania attorney general be indicted for leaking the secrets of a previous grand jury. And it’s been nearly as long since the Inquirer revealed that two of its reporters had been subpoenaed for the apparent leak of information from Kane’s grand jury.

We’re still waiting to find out if the Montgomery County District Attorney will accept or reject the grand jury’s recommendation. But there’s an obvious absurdity in this scandal, now that we’ve reached the point that a leak about a leak is being investigated.

How did we get to this point, anyway? The answer may be easier to find if we understand Pennsylvania’s grand jury process. We talked with several experts who were unconnected to the Kane case, and would not comment specifically on it — choosing instead to describe the grand jury process in general terms. (We also relied on the Pennsylvania code concerning grand juries.)

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